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High Capacity Recordable Disc 1.0 by Philips

Written by Lasse Penttinen @ 12 May 2003 13:34 User comments (11)

According to the source Philips has released specs for a High Capacity Recordable Disc. The disc is based on Compact Disc techonology and can hold up to 98 minutes and 29 seconds of data for a 12 cm disc. For 8 cm disc the maximum playback capacity is approx. 30 minutes.
The new higher density format is not 100% compatible with the Red Book standard, but according to Philips a majority of current CD players are able to play it.

How far will the Compact Disc technology strech? And what actually is the point as DVD recordable technology seems to penetrate the market very rapidly.

CDRINFO.COM

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11 user comments

112.5.2003 14:41

The Compact Disc technology needs to strech to create a 120+ min. media. I am still too poor to buy a DVD writer and the 80min that is currently out there is not enough!


Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy. - Benjamin Franklin
Time is never wasted when you are wasted all the time. - Catherine Zandonella
Reality is an illusion that occurs due to the lack of alcohol. - W.C. Fields

212.5.2003 22:42

Do we really need another format? I think they should help with the transition to DVD-formats instead of pushing out new ones with shorter lifespans.

313.5.2003 2:55
Sefy
Inactive

I Agree with maryjayne, i'd like 120 min CDR which will be compatible with atleast most CD Players/DVD Players. I'm too poor and couldn't care less about DVD Recorders, especialy since i'm hoping FMD-ROM will take their place sooner, all the DVD recording standards are idiotic and unwarnted!


Best Regards,
Sefy Levy,
Certified Computer Technician.

413.5.2003 14:57
Prisoner
Inactive

I think Blu-Ray will kill DVD current state than the FMD-Rom. A fluoresence tech sounds good, but the media would be short lived like VHS. Just hit it with a high power DVD lazer and it would be photobleached completely in about a year. Data loss would be huge.


I am not a number
I am a Free Man

513.5.2003 23:14

It's a nice thought, but the hi-density discs seem to have come just a little too late in the game. And if these discs require a new burner, who wants to be stuck with obsolete equipment once dvd burners really come down in price? Maybe, this is just a way for disc-manufacturers to up their disc prices. (I doubt very much if will cost any more to produce a 98 min disc opposed to a standard 80 min disc). And here, at the birth of even newer higher-densty formats (BluRay, etc.) we're facing the same, tired, old problem of multiple formats. Why does it seem that there there is always one too many disc formats????

614.5.2003 6:48
Sefy
Inactive

Alot of CDRW's can already burn 99min, for example Lite-On and AOpen and AsusTek and others, but it was never an official standard, all that happened now that it has become official.


Best Regards,
Sefy Levy,
Certified Computer Technician.

715.5.2003 2:45

(You're right Sefy, I had forgotten about that). Still, all-in-all, I think it's a case of 'too-little-too-late. People will still pay a premium for anything 'new', even if 'new' means 'still outdated'. I saw Radio Shack the other day, for example, selling 3" (8cm) mini-dvd rw's for 3 times the cost of a standard blank. (And those 99-minute cdrs tend to play havoc with most standalones). (Sefy, I've "read you" somewhere). Far and wide I believe. In 2 or 3 years of audio/video struggling & web-surfing, I think I *may* even have some of your tutorials printed out! (Good to 'see' you!) -- Klingy --

815.5.2003 23:02
Sefy
Inactive

I Don't know how "late" it is, since as i've said, it's just now "official" while alot of people I know have already been using it. So maybe now those 99 won't caush havoc anymore for that specific reason ;-) As for in 2 or 3 years, well, we'll all propably laugh we were using CDR's in the first place :-D PS: Maybe you "read me" on DVDRhelp ? ;-)


Best Regards,
Sefy Levy,
Certified Computer Technician.

916.5.2003 2:11

[[That's very possible]]. I'm not really sure, Sef, but I have printouts (sheaves of them in fact, buried somewhere around here) from yourself; from the guides in here @ A/D; from DVD-Digest; VCDHelper; a few from Doom-9s (the walking-talking-breathing-living microprocessor); and even Nicky Page. (Remember Nicky?) Nick got me started in all this 'mess', and as you can see, since discovering this website, I've pretty much lost what few marbles I had left. <gg> There's no question, you're an established video guru in your own right. Re. those 90 and 99 minute cds... to be honest, even if they are now an official standard, I have never once seen any of them for sale in my area (Nova Scotia, Canada). So maybe now those 99 won't cause havoc anymore for that reason. [official standardization] . Except for 90% of the installed base of dvd and cd players, I suppose you're right. ;-) (That was just a joke, Sef). Since I've never seen one, I've never been able to test one. I suspect that older (even quite expensive) cd players like my Denon DVD-815, would throw a hissy-fit if I tried to use a 99-minute cdr. ...in 2 or 3 years, we'll all probably laugh we were using cdrs in the first place. I was reading in an old Audio magazine, that when blank cds first came to Canada, they cost a *whopping* $45.00 each! Myself, I was even dumb enough (since I hadn't discovered these websites) to buy a standalone Pioneer cd-music recorder (something like $600), and fed it with $20.00 "For-Music-Use-Only" blank cds. (The ones with the silly royalty markups), which you buy for $2.00 now. (Can't wait for Blu-laser). But I'll bet we'll have 2 or 3 conflicting and totally incompatible hi-density standards before the dust settles. God, I hate Format Wars. (I'm rambling......) Best Regards, Sefy. -- Mike --

1018.5.2003 6:51
Sefy
Inactive

I appriciate the kind remarks, although I hardly consider myself a video guru, if you take notice at my guides, they are all from a newbie point of view, since I still consider myself that way ;-) I'm sure in a few years when DVDR's will be more afordable for the "mass" public, people will buy less and less CDR's, but I still give CDR's a good 5 years as a minimum, and they would still be very much around after. Why ? cause no matter how you look at it, there is too much equipment based on CD then there is for a DVD, so they will always be a lot more useful. And as you've pointed out, there are way too many standards for DVDR right now, while CDR simply gets a little more capacity, and hey it will be playable on everything that comes after it ;-)


Best Regards,
Sefy Levy,
Certified Computer Technician.

1119.5.2003 2:46

(That's right)....everything that comes after it. Right now, I'm guessing older cd music players won't like them. And I agree -- cdrs, right now, are way more reliable than dvds. (I love cdrs to death). I routinely make 3-inch (8cm) mini-cd mp3 data discs for my new ultra-sexy insanely wonderful Aiwa XPZ3C portable MP3 player. ($300 bucks! - ouch!) Creating a full dvd data disc with 4.36 gig's worth of important data is a fool's errand. (I would never backup my hard drive to a dvd). Burn failures on dvd are commonplace (I have found). If you sneeze sideways, you're apt to lose scads of data-blocks. The density is high, the track-width is miniscule, and gosh help you if you get a fingerprint, scratch or smudge on your blank dvd. (CDRs are far more reliable in this area, and cheep-cheep-cheep). Sefy, you tend to classify yourself as a 'newbie', but nothing could be further from the truth. You shouldn't be so modest. (I can't seem to find my bank of printouts), but I have a pretty good memory, and I *know* I have learned a lot from you). Should you ever decide to pen a tutorial for this website, I will be looking most closely!! Hey! I've got an idea, Sef!!! : If this latest hare-brained scheme of Walt Disney Enterprises ever takes off come August of this year, http://www.afterdawn.com/news/archive/4086.cfm , how about whippin' up a tasty tutorial for us entitled, "Backing Up the Self-Destructing Discs From Disney" ??? Couldn't be that hard, right? If, with all the self-clouding chemical-technology incorporated into these delicate little losers, they only turn out to be single-layer, we could use DVD-Decrypter to do a straight disc-image!!!! (Is Disney nuts??) Very interesting times ahead....... At the onset of public dvd release, (10 years ago?) this idea would probably have worked (it would have destroyed the earlier DivX scheme, but today, backing-up dvds is becoming ever-more commonplace. (Not mainstream perhaps, but certainly getting there. If these Disney discs are directly back-up-able, they (Disney) are going to take a pounding. (I'm rambling again....) Great 'chatting' wiff Ya, Mr. Guru!!!! -- Klingy --

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 19 May 2003 @ 2:52

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