AfterDawn: Tech news

Australian MP3 site shut down

Written by Jari Ketola @ 28 Oct 2003 12:22 User comments (2)

Australian MP3 site shut down Australian ISP ComCen has agreed not to re-post any contents to web site under the url www.mp3s4free.net. ComCen and record labels agreed on the arrangement on Tuesday in the Federal Court in Sydney.
The site, which offered links to pirated MP3 files, was removed from the Net yesterday by the site's owner, Stephen Cooper. According to Cooper he didn't have enough financial resources to fight the case to the end. ComCen had refused to take the site offline in spite of legal threats from the music industry.

Both Cooper and ComCen were sued last week by major labels alleging that www.mp3s4free.net violated their copyrights. The site, however, contained nothing but links to files -- none of the illegal files were hosted at ComCen or posted by Cooper. Both Cooper and ComCen insisted that the site was just a directory.

The nature of linking directly to third party files has been a matter of debate for ages. Is it illegal to provide links to pirated material? Would a database of user submitted URLs be illegal, if the only intention of the database was to gather links to copyrighted music? Morally the question is clear, but the legal aspects are far more complicated.

Source:
ZDNet Australia

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2 user comments

129.10.2003 7:15

Quote from news item above>"Morally the question is clear," If you take into consideration how "major lables" and the RIAA have treated their artists and customers over the years is it really all that clear? I guess stealing from a thief does not make it right. As Bob Dylan said, "Steal a little and they through you in jail, steal a lot and they make you a King."


We mustn't lower ourselves to the level of those we loathe, lest we become loathsome ourselves.

229.10.2003 7:16

Oops, that would be THROW, not through.


We mustn't lower ourselves to the level of those we loathe, lest we become loathsome ourselves.

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