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iTunes' locked music unlocked

Written by Jari Ketola @ 22 Nov 2003 14:44 User comments (12)

iTunes' locked music unlocked Jon Lech Johansen has released an open source software for saving DRM locked iTunes files to decrypted format. The software does not decrypt the DRM itself, but rather dumps the decrypted stream from memory while it's being played in iTunes. The program is called QuickTime for Windows AAC memory dumper.
This "security hole" is well known and can be used to bypass any type of protection, since data has to be in fully decrypted form before it is passed on to the sound output. These types of holes are known as the analog hole -- no matter what you do, it's always there. If everything else fails, you can always record the analog output signal from the computer.

It remains to be seen whether or not Apple will start releasing new versions of iTunes that requires for the memory dumper to be updated each time.

Jon Lech Johansen, aka DVD Jon is best known for his work with DeCSS, which allowed Linux users to view CSS protected DVDs.

Source:
The Register

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12 user comments

122.11.2003 16:48
alxdotnet
Inactive

Unless of course the DRM is implemented right in the sound card...but the "analog hole" still applies...until we have smart wires...ok im rambling.


Comp 1: Dell Inspiron P4 2.4Ghz / 512 MB RAM with 24x CD-RW and Firewire In, SVideo Out running XP Pro
Comp 2: Dell Dimension P3 550Mhz / 384MB RAM with old 2x CD-RW running XP Home.

223.11.2003 4:47

Johansen rules man :-)

323.11.2003 16:59

alxdotnet: This is not exploiting the anolog loophole, which will be available for as long as music is able to be heard. This program gives you the exact same aac data, bit for bit. It's loseless. It's exactly the same. And it's pretty damn cool.

424.11.2003 6:36

Quote> "Unless of course the DRM is implemented right in the sound card..." This is EXACTLY what the "trusted computer" initiative is aiming to do. I bet they are trying to come up with water marking that "trusted" soundcards would recognize at the audio input to plug that analog "hole" as well.


We mustn't lower ourselves to the level of those we loathe, lest we become loathsome ourselves.

524.11.2003 11:38
alxdotnet
Inactive

Worst Case Scenario: we all end up recording on our old P4 3.2Ghz machines. Sounds good to me!


Comp 1: Dell Inspiron P4 2.4Ghz / 512 MB RAM with 24x CD-RW and Firewire In, SVideo Out running XP Pro
Comp 2: Dell Dimension P3 550Mhz / 384MB RAM with old 2x CD-RW running XP Home.

624.11.2003 13:57
pcshateme
Inactive

its always going to be there, before i got a cd burner (a long long time ago) i would hook my cassette recorder to the audio out on my computer using a double male head phone cable, the same can be done with coping cds- if they can ever "burn proof" audio cds, I'll just play the files into the pc through my line in, save as .wav and burn!


come to the grassyknoll video game roms archive
http://grassyknoll.dk3.com
show your stuff- debate politics
http://aroomwithamoose.dk3.com

725.11.2003 7:31

They (the RIAA) are not going to stop the consumer from doing what they want with the music they listen to. Piracy is just a smoke screen as far as I'm concerned. I will not buy copy protected audio CD's, I will not purchase CD's from RIAA members...period. I support Indie artists. Just think what will happen if the RIAA members get their way and outlaw ADC/DAC devices, or tax them, they will then squash (at least try to) the independant music Artists/makers/studios out there. If you want to record and sell music then you need to use a large music company to do it, at least that is what they want. Smells like control issues to me!


Starcruiser

Intel 440BX MB, Dual Intel 1.2Ghz P3's, 2GB RAM
TDK 440N, 390GB ATI AIW 8500DV Win2k Srvr

825.11.2003 8:28

Anybody know where to get the source for the app mentioned in the story?


We mustn't lower ourselves to the level of those we loathe, lest we become loathsome ourselves.

925.11.2003 8:36

strcruzer> CNET is smashing one of the biggest librarys of indy music in the world as we speak. They bought mp3.com and are going to DELETE over a million song files that have been free legal downloads without any DRM. BTW, CNET is going into the pay download music biz... Go figure.


We mustn't lower ourselves to the level of those we loathe, lest we become loathsome ourselves.

1025.11.2003 12:06
pcshateme
Inactive

there is NO way to EVER stop digital video or audio copying EVER. there will always be people like me to crack encryption. Why should we be forced to pay obscene amounts for cds, that we wont know we like until we buy them at $15 each (and you cant return cds so if it sux your screwed) also, the artists we listen to see bareley any of the money from cds, so its not us ripping them off its the RIAA and there labels!


come to the grassyknoll video game roms archive
http://grassyknoll.dk3.com
show your stuff- debate politics
http://aroomwithamoose.dk3.com

1125.11.2003 12:51
alxdotnet
Inactive

if you can play it, you can copy it. it's that simple.


Comp 1: Dell Inspiron P4 2.4Ghz / 512 MB RAM with 24x CD-RW and Firewire In, SVideo Out running XP Pro
Comp 2: Dell Dimension P3 550Mhz / 384MB RAM with old 2x CD-RW running XP Home.

1225.11.2003 21:25

I'm not sure about this line of info but I'd like to say that I have been copying music from LP's; then from 8 tracks [oh yeah] and then from cassettes. Making my own "favorites" collections since the early 70's. The RIAA will try, but they can't stop it totally. Just a shame little people get hurt in the process. Thanks for listening, suep6


...knowing just enough to be dangerous...

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