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Sharman lawyer accuses witness of switching sides

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 08 Dec 2004 12:12 User comments (1)

Sharman lawyer accuses witness of switching sides Lawyer for Sharman Networks, Mark Lemming, has accused University of Melbourne professor Leon Sterling of switching sides in the Kazaa trial currently taking place in Sydney Australia. He alleges that at one time Leon Sterling had offered to be an expert witness for Sharman Networks, but later emailed them withdrawing an offer to be an expert witness for Sharman during the civil trial, saying that writing a report requested by Sharman would be "stretching his expertise." During cross-examination, Lemming used the e-mail to question Sterling's expertise in the trial against the company, which makes the Kazaa peer-to-peer software. "Your lack of experience in P2P makes it difficult for you to tell the court of any feasibility for the propositions you mentioned," Lemming said.
Sterling claims that it was not possible for him to put together an expert report on how the Kazaa P2P network works because of the limited time he had to do it. Sterling added that he was not able to do a feasibility study on the proposals that he made and acknowledged that any filtering done in Sharman's Kazaa system would not be 100 percent efficient. However on Tuesday, Sterling made suggestions on how to filter and monitor the network, and he continues to back his suggestions, calling them "all plausible mechanisms" that can be added to the Kazaa system.

Source:
ZDnet

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1 user comment

113.12.2004 19:16
vudoo
Inactive

I see that the government is all bought out by the RIAA. At this rate p2p will be illegal by spring of 2005. So I subscribed to Napster To Go for $14.95 and bought the iRiver H320 from Best Buys in which is compatible for Napster To Go. You can Download an Unlimited number of tracks and listen to them on your Napster To Go device and up to 3 PC's for as long as you subscribe. Not bad I say and p2p like I said is on its last leg. Of course there will always be illegal programs passed through the net forever as they are decentralized. And if we can get ANTS to work before this happens we'll have true anonymous p2p to destribute whatever we damn well please and there will be no stopping us.

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