AfterDawn: Tech news

BayTSP shows latest weapon against filesharers

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 16 Jan 2005 6:41 User comments (16)

BayTSP shows latest weapon against filesharers A few days ago, BayTSP announced FirstSource, an automated system that tracks files on the eDonkey P2P network and BitTorrent trackers and identifies the first uploaders of the files. BayTSP believe that if they track back to the very first uploaders and hand the details over to the entertainment industry they can seriously damage sharing of copyrighted content over P2P networks. Both the eD2K network and BitTorrent use a system known as swarming, which means that users download and upload files in small pieces to help spread them around the network quicker.
"Pirated copies of movies and software typically appear online within hours of release," said Mark Ishikawa, CEO of BayTSP. "Identifying and taking action against the first uploaders can greatly slow the distribution of illegally-obtained intellectual property and might make users think twice before doing it." However, if you had asked the average AfterDawn regular who uses P2P applications, they would have told you months (if not years) ago that going after the first sources of files was the only way to slow down sharing. They would also tell you that BitTorrent is not a P2P network as half the worlds media have mistaken it as.

The important thing that people are forgetting is that P2P networks are still completely legal and can be used for legitimate purposes. BitTorrent has lately been seen as an evil program that allows pirates to share absolutely anything they want with each other with phenomenal speeds, but people forget that it was created for a whole different purpose and is used on many websites to distribute material legally. The entertainment industry is pushing these stories and systems that all claim they will kill P2P sharing of copyrighted content, but they forget to tell you that as technology evolves so will P2P. P2P through mobile phones is a growing possibility for example. Also some new P2P applications are trying alternative methods such as file routing, that mean that the downloader would never know the IP of the uploader and vice versa. This amazing new BayTSP system is nothing new and won't have much effect.

Source:
Music Industry News Network

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16 user comments

116.1.2005 7:05

I don't use P2P, so this really doesn't affect me. However, the mere fact that the guy referenced AD proves that they keep an eye on us. Just more of Big Brother watching, and the erosion of personal privacy IMO.

216.1.2005 7:42

Lmao, Dela added that, I doubt they even watch us. It's always like this, big coorperations think of the fancy schmancy ways to deal with their problems, when they could use the simplest methods. Go figure.

Quote:
BayTSP believe that if they track back to the very first uploaders and hand the details over to the entertainment industry they can seriously damage sharing of copyrighted content over P2P networks.
"Seriously damage", You are not seriously damaging ANYTHING, you are just postponing the inevitable. Why don't you try to shut down the internet instead, oh great BayTSP? I hear there are thousands upon thousands of bodies due to a recent disaster, but I doubt your company would care very much, instead trying to stop us.

316.1.2005 9:11

You read this article, and the first thing you do is shut down Azerus. THe second thing you do is read the user opinions. THe third thing you do is laugh, start up Azerus and download Oceans 12. The fourth thing you do is post how rediculous it is that the press is making a bid deal out of it.

416.1.2005 9:23

http://www.baytsp.com/press/firstsource_pressrelease.html the article says that it determines if it is pirated by the file name?? It says that it can issue DMCA take-down service even if it hasn't finished downloading the file to verify? I don't know about the rest of you, but on eDonkey, I have downloaded many things that turn out to be porn. Usually un-copyrighted. I think they could easily just change the name and note it on the page where you download the torrent, and then this problem would be nonexistant. It will make it even harder to use BitTorrent effectively, but thats the way of these things.

516.1.2005 11:46

Quote:
Alien vs. Predator was the top pirated film for the second month in a row with 37,212 copies available for download via the Fast Track and eDonkey networks, according to statistics for online movie and software piracy and P2P use in December from digital tracking firm BayTSP
That is not quoted from the above article but from another one. Now they claim that on kazaa and ed2k there is 37,212 copies of Alien v.s Predator availible. I believe that BayTSP is cheating the Entertainment Industry and showing it more bad than it really is, probably so they'll get more business. I have some questions about those stats.... 1. Over how many days was this test run to get these figures? because in case you dont know BayTSP, a lot of ISP's assign IP Addresses dynamically, which means that if you disconnect and re-connect you get a different IP and then get a different userhash, client ID etc. so i bet you have counted many sources more than once. 2. Where the downloads all verified as the real thing? FastTrack and eD2K are full of fake files! 3. On the eD2K network, how many of these source were in fact full sources? I think that these stats should be more detailed. If I went to eD2K and looked for alien vs. predator files now, i bet i would not find anywhere near 37.000 sources for the file!

616.1.2005 14:04

Thanks to these people, eventually programers will make it so thanks to P2P apps such as Ants, whos traffic would increase if all other sources are cut off, the original uploaders will NEVER be caught. Also, most piracy groups watch these things and always stay one step ahead of the "good guys". Piracy is simply a circle, it doesn't end and never will, it is human nature to take chances and piracy groups will do just that. P.S. I don't support piracy, i just like to point out the facts about it.

716.1.2005 14:34

interesting to note that nowhere do they actually even hint at how it works, unless they can start downloading a file within minutes of it being released, they have absolutely no chance of finding where it came from...and we all know how easy it is to immediately start downloading a new file.....NOT !!!!

816.1.2005 18:05
FartDude
Inactive

@ dela, I second that dude i mean tryin too dl a full movie on a "true" P2P network is almost impossible, there is no way there can be that many sources for AVP on a p2p network, a few good reasons being that a copy of the movie would havta be a good 700-900 mb for good quality and some networks hardly have files of this size, another the movie would havta be split into 2 files for efficent sharing in p2p app i think whom came up with the figures counted every file available in which some could have been multiple parts of the movie, and then its like dela said there are tons of fakes out there too. Although i have found a few avi's of movies on such networks and the movie was complete in one file but there were little sources so it took quite some time too finish.

917.1.2005 7:30

I think its just funny to see them scrawnging for anything at all. And spending all this money on countermeasures that dont work. They've been making all this money for so long and now there panicing at the thought of a paycut. Why dont they accept it, there is no possible way to prevent file sharing of copywrited materials. Just like there methods of trying to prevent audio cd from being recognized in computers. How the He-ll do they think they could do this? if it plays in a cd player at all, all you have to do is use audio inputs to inport it into your computer. OMG do they have a brain at all?

1017.1.2005 10:04
darrenm38
Inactive

what i would like to know who the hell is downloading that crap film, the nature of computers is that there evolving faster better so how there supossed , to stop file sharing is beyond me . for every 1 they close 2 pop up.

1117.1.2005 14:00
scott2453
Inactive

the thing i never understood about the entertainment industry is that they spend all this money on these programs to stop piracy. The way I see it the only thing theyre doing is giving all the programmers who support P2P or whatever another project to do. Why dont they just declare the internet illegal and throw everyone in jail and be done with it?

1217.1.2005 16:09

I hate to say it but im worried that the ISPs' will eventually be paid off to start measures at preventing it!

1317.1.2005 16:33

But, if the ISP's were bought out and did something about it, wouldnt they really be cutting their own throats...losing business ultimately? People would be extremely disatisfied and feel abandoned if their ISP gave in to this BS and took measures. I dont see it happening.



1417.1.2005 18:19

I'm just glad I have Comcast, because Comcast has been one of the providers to not give out information.

1517.1.2005 21:50

actually, comcast is guilty of other things as well; I've seen many instances in forums, people complaining of takedown notices and reports of bandwidth being throttled down on ports typically used by p2p progs. Comcast isn't innocent, but they're also not stupid; the majority of cable users ARE p2p users, that is a fact they surely consider, i.e. their unwillingness to divulge individual's information. It all boils down to the same thing; the corporations must embrace this technology...' imagine, if you will, being able to rent a movie and dowload it immediately (yes i know its already being done) and watch it immediately, from your pc to tv, thats already possible, too. Let them continue to fight, their greed will be their eventual demise; how long can they continue to fail in their attempts before being replaced?

1618.1.2005 12:20

yeah, I suspected they might do that. That doesn't affect me however, as I have never used default ports for anything. They also will soon boost the 3Mbps connection to 4Mbps for free! Comcast is really great, just don't use default ports.

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