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Internet2-based i2Hub closed

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 14 Nov 2005 18:31 User comments (3)

i2Hub, an Internet2-based file swapping network has closed its doors today citing potential legal concerns. The network allowed anyone with access to the ultra-high-speed research network to swap files much faster than is possible on the Internet. I2Hub was used by many college students to trade copyrighted music and movies at very high speeds, a practice that brought lawsuits upon many of them.
In September, i2Hub was a target of threats from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). The organisation was using the Supreme Court's infamous "Grokster ruling" as grounds for the threats. i2Hub's founder didn't comment on the closure at all and the service's website on Monday had just the message "R.I.P. 11.14.2005".

Source:
News.com


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3 user comments

115.11.2005 13:42

Wow! They caught that pretty quick! (lmao) Although, it didn't take that long to stop one of the first waves of P2P.

215.11.2005 13:53

Quote:
Wow! They caught that pretty quick!
True, but at the end of the day, they could have easily amassed an entire file collection equivalent to a file sharing veteran in just a matter of days....If I remember correctly, internet2 connections can max out about 6gb/s transfer rate.... say they downloaded for 10 seconds an that rate...It would take me at least a week to get that amount of data, and that's going day & night !!

316.11.2005 8:45
duckNrun
Inactive

One of the major points of the I2 IS the rapid rate of transfer for digital media. It this this rate that is needed for realistic movie downloads/purchases via the studio, the network, or the retailer. If I2Hub was shut down via the grockster decision then that would seem to imply that they were marketing themselves as beneficial or purposeful for copyright infringement... either that or they just caved with fear from the (dia)RIAA (lol)

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