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Parliament may change how DRM affects you

Written by Dave Horvath @ 06 Jun 2006 9:24 User comments (10)

A recent inquiry made by Members of Parliament (MPs) has brought up several cases against music and video producers who regularly use Digital Rights Management (DRM) to help thwart piracy of copyrighted materials.
The public inquiry's purpose was to view DRM technologies from leading media industry groups. With DRM becoming increasingly popular with digital media such as music, movies and operators of online stores, it became apparent by the MPs that some scrutiny be taken to ensure that British law isn't being superseded by DRM practices.

The MPs released a report encouraging producers that choose to distribute their wares with DRM protection should label the media accordingly so the consumer knows, prior to purchase, exactly what they are getting into. It also ensures that upon purchase, if DRM protection is circumvented, the consumer was made well aware of what infringements they may or may not have broken.

The report went on to urge the makers of DRM systems to be aware of consequences of using aggresive protection practices on their products. This report was in direct relation to practices used by media giant Sony BMG in which they employ a virus-like DRM method which hides the copy protection on a CD to avoid the information to be copied. Corporations like this needed to be made aware that using such practices in the UK run a risk of being prosecuted for criminal acts.

Members of the All Party Parliamentary Internet Group hope that this report will widen the government's view on digital media and how it relates to the consumers. One Executive Director in support of such movements, Suw Charman said, "DRM was less about protecting copyright and more about creating a system in which people rent rather than own the media they spend money on. We think people rightly feel that once they buy something, it stays bought."

Source:
BBC

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10 user comments

16.6.2006 11:38

Quote:
We think people rightly feel that once they buy something, it stays bought
I couldn't agree more. Well done. About time DRM policies got taught a lesson or two.

26.6.2006 11:47

Well its good to see the government FINALLY taking some action against DRM. These corporations really have no right to tell us what to do with our own possessions, and somebody needs to do something about it. And I am so tired of these companies coming out with their "new and better" DRM. Its all the same old shit, and it will be broken; they are wasting their time. Maybe someday they'll start worrying about the quality of their content, instead of how to make the most money off of it. But until then, keep laughing as their protection schemes are circumvented and cracked again and again.

36.6.2006 13:57

Some people never learn. Fortunately we do.

46.6.2006 14:21
gogochar
Inactive

I can only hope this reaches the USA. :"

56.6.2006 14:50

You'd be lucky. The american government allow the MPAA so they won't allow this.

66.6.2006 17:14

sounds good so far, but lets see how "far" it gets.

77.6.2006 4:35

The american government allow the MPAA so they won't allow this. Sad but true....

87.6.2006 10:07

This battle was lost in the US when the DMCA was made law. The big media cabal will continue to agressivly persue a "pay every time you watch/listen" market environment. We can't expect those poor executives and majority stock holders to give up their fondest wet dream.

98.6.2006 6:33
Boughto
Inactive

"if DRM protection is circumvented, the consumer was made well aware of what infringements they may or may not have broken" What about THEM breaking YOUR Blu-ray PLAYER... Literally 'This device will self-destruct in 5 seconds'! Ahhh, Sony does it again... www.tgdaily.com/2005/08/10/blu/index.html You govs better get onto it before they implement this crap... That article is nearly a YEAR old, but I bet they don't even have a clue what's proposed. AACS will also mean the player MUST also be permanently connected to the Internet too... One word of warning: don't scratch your BR Discs, it might read as warez and render your player useless ;)

108.6.2006 6:36

And while we're at it, the only people who will have fully functioning Blu-ray players will be the pirates themselves!!!

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