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Sharp has prototype for new "Ultra Definition"

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 18 Mar 2007 10:13 User comments (13)

Sharp has prototype for new "Ultra Definition" Sharp, the TV distributor, currently has a prototype of a 64-inch TV with a resolution of about 4000x2000 pixels, which is equivalent to 8.8 megapixels.
To compare, a 1080p TV has a resolution of 2 megapixels so this new prototype blows a current generation HDTV out of the water.

Reviews at Cnet say that the quality of the picture is unbelievable and hope to see Sharp commercialize the TV in time for the next HD disc war that follows Blu-Ray and HD-DVD.

Source:
Cnet

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13 user comments

118.3.2007 10:27

Quote:
hope to see Sharp commercialize the TV in time for the next HD disc war that follows Blu-ray and HD-DVD.
*groans* Not another one!

218.3.2007 11:30

Just as i Finally catch up with todays Tech.They do this.It sounds great though.With that resolution,i just cant imagine.

With TV's 60" and higher,Your gonna need more pixels and higher resolution for that size.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 18 Mar 2007 @ 11:31

318.3.2007 12:08

I agree, but I think they should have made it even bigger really. My only issue with it is that I wonder if resolutions such as 720p will look bad on it similar to the way 480i looks bad on 720p TVs. If it does work that way they will have to have newer sources that can put out atleast 1080p if not higher.

418.3.2007 12:16

Jeez those companies should give it a rest. It ain't gonna be too soon when movie theatres have those as their screens instead of projectors.

518.3.2007 13:49
BobbyBlu
Inactive

I heard about this set last summer but i heard that it was giving people motion sickness.

618.3.2007 16:02

Originally posted by BobbyBlu:
I heard about this set last summer but i heard that it was giving people motion sickness.
Yeah, I read that too. Some people experienced motion sickness while others said the picture was like being there.


http://www.afterdawn.com/news/archive/5941.cfm
http://www.afterdawn.com/glossary/terms/uhdv.cfm

718.3.2007 16:31

But what kind of source could you feed this. Ive seen the Narnia trailer in 1440p and thats it, How long was 480i around 50 years?

818.3.2007 18:02
aabbccdd
Inactive

and wonder what the price is going to be. i would guess 5000.00 dollars plus . so many aren't going to be able to afford it

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 18 Mar 2007 @ 18:02

918.3.2007 19:10

Wait, how on earth are they going to distribute the MASSIVE, maybe in the terabytes, file for movies? This seems like overkill for today, but I'm not saying this isn't cool.

1018.3.2007 20:45

Originally posted by GambitRox:
Wait, how on earth are they going to distribute the MASSIVE, maybe in the terabytes, file for movies? This seems like overkill for today, but I'm not saying this isn't cool.
This will probably be commercial in 7 years or so, so prepare, says I :)

1119.3.2007 2:22

Quote:
Originally posted by GambitRox:
Wait, how on earth are they going to distribute the MASSIVE, maybe in the terabytes, file for movies? This seems like overkill for today, but I'm not saying this isn't cool.
This will probably be commercial in 7 years or so, so prepare, says I :)
In 7 years I will have and be happy with my 10 year old technology!

1219.3.2007 17:45

Wow, that's just great. I was just getting into this new video source called "DVD". Anyone heard of them? Supposedly they're a lot better than VHS, and will soon replace the medium all together. What's next? A surround sound system that plays in more than 2 channel stereo? Hah! I think not in this lifetime.

1312.11.2007 1:28

Originally posted by GambitRox:
Wait, how on earth are they going to distribute the MASSIVE, maybe in the terabytes, file for movies? This seems like overkill for today, but I'm not saying this isn't cool.
Ok, most High Def movies use around 16 or so Gb of data on a HD DVD or BD. The rest is left for uncompressed audio in multiple formats and extra features. If 1440p is 4 times the data as 1080p, than it is my guess that they could, if nothing better was available, put the movie onto two Blue Ray Discs, since those discs can hold 60 Gb's. If need be, the movie could be split into three discs to allow for the same amount of uncompressed audio and extra features. Of course there will be some media that will be able to handle 1440p's massive data on a single disc by the time 1440p tv's become popular, anyway.

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