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DVD sales will be flat for the year thanks to next gen DVD sales

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 24 Jun 2007 8:24 User comments (26)

DVD sales will be flat for the year thanks to next gen DVD sales According to analysts participating at the Home Entertainment Summit: DVD and Beyond this week, standard DVD sales are down this year but sales for the year will remain flat thanks to next gen DVDs, namely Blu ray and HD DVD.
The analysts noted that "the disc gold rush days are long past", especially now that there is an 80% market penetration for DVD hardware.

“[The year could end] up flat, or slightly up, depending on the degree to which high-def takes off,”
noted Kelly Avery, president of worldwide home entertainment at Paramount Pictures. “Box office for the summer is up 5% [compared to 2006], making it bigger than the last two summers.”

To date, worldwide spending on DVD purchases is down 2.6% from the same period last year, and in the US spending was down 5.2%.

Besides the falling sales, the participants added that they belive HD sales will help the industry stay flat or even return to growth.

“It’s in the very, very early days of our forecasts, but we believe that high-definition discs will help return consumer video spending to growth,”
said Helen Davis Jayalath, senior analyst video at Screen Digest.

According to Screen Digest, gamers will have some impact on HD sales in the future, mainly due to the decent sales of the PlayStation 3 and its built in Blu ray drive. According to the group, by 2010, there will be 45 million next-gen consoles sold worldwide with many of those being the PS3. In the same period, there will be 30 million next gen stand alone players sold, with most of those being HD DVD players.

“Studios will feel they can’t afford to ignore the other constituency, and manufacturers will become agnostic”
said Jayalath. “[Although BD will capture a larger install base,] PS3 users will buy far fewer discs than those buying set-top boxes. If you are a gamer, you have substantially less time to watch movies.

Blu-ray discs are expected to outsell HD DVD discs by a 1.7-to-1 ratio by 2010"
added Screen Digest.

Source:
VB

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26 user comments

124.6.2007 9:07

Quote:
Blu-ray discs are expected to outsell HD DVD discs by a 1.7-to-1 ratio by 2010" added Screen Digest.
pretty bold

224.6.2007 9:20

Quote:
Blu-ray discs are expected to outsell HD DVD discs by a 1.7-to-1 ratio by 2010" added Screen Digest.
But, as I am sure most people are forgetting, the current life of a Blu-ray and HD DVD player is real short, only ~3-4 years if I remember right due to the infancy of the laser.

So even if Blu-ray, with their rotting disks, outsells HD DVD, which probably has some similar-but-maybe-not-as-drastic problem of its own, the real winner will probably DVDs for at least the next 3-5 years.

EDIT: By then, who knows, both Blu-ray and HD DVD maybe over taken by something better and not even have a chance to become the "Next-Gen DVD".

Peace
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 24 Jun 2007 @ 9:22

325.6.2007 0:54

from VHS to DVD was a real big step and people saw a real improvement. From DVD to HD is no big impact quality is not improved only quantity of storage. Even with the new movies a lot of space is taken by the stupid menus and extras. And who wants, Dolby digital 20.2?! A real improvement would be no disc at all and that is the tendency and I guess that will be real winner. It is already there: just think of the downloadable legally available movies and programs, the available huge hardrives and wireless home networks, the need for connectivity everywhere, for light-weight devices and so. Hey, I just throwed out my vhs collection. Should I start disposing my dvd collection: No way I'm already thinking in setting up my own collection on a hard drive.

425.6.2007 2:04

Quote:
“It’s in the very, very early days of our forecasts, but we believe that high-definition discs will help return consumer video spending to growth,” said Helen Davis Jayalath, senior analyst video at Screen Digest.
I just agree with this cause it is really too early. I love my standard DVD.

525.6.2007 2:40

I totally agree with you all that's no need for me to repeat your comments, and the vast mayority of DVD users/consumers think and feel the same way about Blu-ray and HD-DVD.

The only thing that we should add, is that the reason why DVD purchases are slightly down from the same period last year, is that they were less DVD releases this year worth buying... if this study didn't take this in consideration, then their results and conclusions are inacurate, and missleading DVD buyers in favor of HD-DVD and Blu-ray consumption.

625.6.2007 4:44

Quote:
From DVD to HD is no big impact quality is not improved only quantity of storage. Even with the new movies a lot of space is taken by the stupid menus and extras. And who wants, Dolby digital 20.2?!
I would agree that the improvement from DVD to HD disc medium is not as drastic as that from VHS to DVD. However, there is a substantial improvement. While quality is certainly improved (480i/p to up to 1080p), the perception of this improvement may not be four fold. When it comes to sound quality improvements there is a major distinction between 5.1 DTS/DD found on DVDs and 5.1 analog PCM on HD medium discs.

725.6.2007 9:10

Quote:
According to Screen Digest, gamers will have some impact on HD sales in the future, mainly due to the decent sales of the PlayStation 3 and its built in Blu ray drive. According to the group, by 2010, there will be 45 million next-gen consoles sold worldwide with many of those being the PS3
Um sry but wtf! not wanting to turn this into a next gen consol war hread, but wtf!so 45 million, so what 360 has already 15 million and wii is close behind, so what these consols are suddenyl goign to stop selling and everyone will by the ps3? Don't think so! persoanlyl think this article is BS because of this idea, and same with the HD DVD winning. No one knows who will win!

825.6.2007 10:30

oh its not Hdef discs that are slowing the market...Hdef is too much of a bloody niche to have a real impact on it yet, the main slow is dvds is crappy movies high prices,ect,ect,ect,ect.

925.6.2007 12:42

I agree with you ZIppyDSM,HD is a niche market at this time.
I think people are getting wise now as waiting a couple of months
until movies drop to a quarter of their initial price also has an
adverse effect.
Since DVD disks are so cheap to manufacture,they should be £5. on
release anyway.

1025.6.2007 14:38
Zoolook2
Inactive

Originally posted by vietorisz:
from VHS to DVD was a real big step and people saw a real improvement. From DVD to HD is no big impact quality is not improved only quantity of storage. Even with the new movies a lot of space is taken by the stupid menus and extras. And who wants, Dolby digital 20.2?! A real improvement would be no disc at all and that is the tendency and I guess that will be real winner. It is already there: just think of the downloadable legally available movies and programs, the available huge hardrives and wireless home networks, the need for connectivity everywhere, for light-weight devices and so. Hey, I just throwed out my vhs collection. Should I start disposing my dvd collection: No way I'm already thinking in setting up my own collection on a hard drive.
lol yeah sure if you are watching your hidef movies on an old crt-tv.

5 times the res of DVD and lossless audio, sorry but if you think there is no improvement you need to upgrade your vision and hearing.

1125.6.2007 17:23

Zoolook2
Oh theres a improvement,its just not compelling enough to spend 10 grand on replacing my current stock of movies and hardware.

Even a quarter of that is unacceptable, in another 5 years everything will be cheaper,why blow the money now?.

1225.6.2007 17:45

Originally posted by vietorisz:
from VHS to DVD was a real big step and people saw a real improvement. From DVD to HD is no big impact quality is not improved only quantity of storage. Even with the new movies a lot of space is taken by the stupid menus and extras. And who wants, Dolby digital 20.2?! A real improvement would be no disc at all and that is the tendency and I guess that will be real winner. It is already there: just think of the downloadable legally available movies and programs, the available huge hardrives and wireless home networks, the need for connectivity everywhere, for light-weight devices and so. Hey, I just throwed out my vhs collection. Should I start disposing my dvd collection: No way I'm already thinking in setting up my own collection on a hard drive.
Originally posted by ChiknLitl:
I would agree that the improvement from DVD to HD disc medium is not as drastic as that from VHS to DVD. However, there is a substantial improvement. While quality is certainly improved (480i/p to up to 1080p), the perception of this improvement may not be four fold. When it comes to sound quality improvements there is a major distinction between 5.1 DTS/DD found on DVDs and 5.1 analog PCM on HD medium discs.
Originally posted by Zoolook2:
lol yeah sure if you are watching your hidef movies on an old crt-tv.

5 times the res of DVD and lossless audio, sorry but if you think there is no improvement you need to upgrade your vision and hearing.
First of all if you watch a standart DVD movie on a 40 inch or less LCD or Plasma 1080p screen (which is more than suficient for most viewers) there will be improvement in image quality if you use an HDMI digital to digital signal, but with CRT screens which handle analog signal only, the image quality is downgraded.

If you want to improve more the image from standart DVD movies, then you need a standart DVD upscaled player, viewers have expressed that the difference is remarkable than normal DVD players, it looks excellent, rich detail, color saturation, richness, and definition all improved, further enhancing the video's picture output.

As for sound quality all you need is a good home theater system to take real advantage of DTS and DD 5.1, most of the current home theater/DVD players do a decent work, but an independent system will provide you with outstanding results.

I recently viewed a movie on a 40 inch 1080p Plasma and it looked spectacular, not only i was surprised that it looked much better than similar LCD screens playing the same signal, when the common asuption is that LCD is much better than Plasma, but i couldn't believe when they told me that the movie was played on a normal DVD player.

I left the store thinking that if you can get such spectacular image quality from a standart DVD player/movie, imagine what you can get from an upscaled image... the bottom line is that all you need is to configure your equipment properly, to take advantages of your current standart DVD movies, and by doing so you will not notice substancial difference in image quality from HD DVD or Blu-ray movies, to justify repurchasing your movie collection.

1325.6.2007 17:53

ematrix
its amazing with what they can do with current tech,I thin everyone would have been better off putting the Hdef discs off 2 or 4 more years and just focusing on better upscaling, I guess DVD will be around for another 10 years no matter what so theres a place to start.

1425.6.2007 20:38

Originally posted by vietorisz:
from VHS to DVD was a real big step and people saw a real improvement. From DVD to HD is no big impact quality is not improved only quantity of storage. Even with the new movies a lot of space is taken by the stupid menus and extras. And who wants, Dolby digital 20.2?! A real improvement would be no disc at all and that is the tendency and I guess that will be real winner. It is already there: just think of the downloadable legally available movies and programs, the available huge hardrives and wireless home networks, the need for connectivity everywhere, for light-weight devices and so. Hey, I just throwed out my vhs collection. Should I start disposing my dvd collection: No way I'm already thinking in setting up my own collection on a hard drive.
Originally posted by ChiknLitl:
I would agree that the improvement from DVD to HD disc medium is not as drastic as that from VHS to DVD. However, there is a substantial improvement. While quality is certainly improved (480i/p to up to 1080p), the perception of this improvement may not be four fold. When it comes to sound quality improvements there is a major distinction between 5.1 DTS/DD found on DVDs and 5.1 analog PCM on HD medium discs.
Originally posted by Zoolook2:
lol yeah sure if you are watching your hidef movies on an old crt-tv.

5 times the res of DVD and lossless audio, sorry but if you think there is no improvement you need to upgrade your vision and hearing.
Quote:
First of all if you watch a standart DVD movie on a 40 inch or less LCD or Plasma 1080p screen (which is more than suficient for most viewers) there will be improvement in image quality if you use an HDMI digital to digital signal, but with CRT screens which handle analog signal only, the image quality is downgraded.

If you want to improve more the image from standart DVD movies, then you need a standart DVD upscaled player, viewers have expressed that the difference is remarkable than normal DVD players, it looks excellent, rich detail, color saturation, richness, and definition all improved, further enhancing the video's picture output.

As for sound quality all you need is a good home theater system to take real advantage of DTS and DD 5.1, most of the current home theater/DVD players do a decent work, but an independent system will provide you with outstanding results.

I recently viewed a movie on a 40 inch 1080p Plasma and it looked spectacular, not only i was surprised that it looked much better than similar LCD screens playing the same signal, when the common asuption is that LCD is much better than Plasma, but i couldn't believe when they told me that the movie was played on a normal DVD player.

I left the store thinking that if you can get such spectacular image quality from a standart DVD player/movie, imagine what you can get from an upscaled image... the bottom line is that all you need is to configure your equipment properly, to take advantages of your current standart DVD movies, and by doing so you will not notice substancial difference in image quality from HD DVD or Blu-ray movies, to justify repurchasing your movie collection.
So, why exactly am I quoted in this response? Let's take a look at this step by step. There is a major quality distinction between true HD material and upscaled material. While upscaling can look almost as good as HD, run-of-the-mill upscaling players almost always result in mosquito noise, artifacting, etc. The generally accepted best upscaling player around has been the Oppo line, even those do not compare with the Toshiba HDAx2 upscaling capabilities.

At 40" or less the issue of 1080p vs 720p is a moot point due to the eyes ability to discern this level of detail at a normal viewing distance. This has been covered ad nauseum elsewhere in this forum. 40" is not "more than suficient" for me or others that would like to appreciate true 1080p resolution from greater than 2-3 feet from the screen. Also, true 5.1 analog PCM surround not to mention the lossless formats that newer receivers will be able to take advantage of, are a large step up from standard 5.1 DD or DTS. Does all of this warrant replacing a video library? In my opinion, no, but my new purchases are HD videos

1526.6.2007 1:29

ChiknLitl, the fact is that upscaled image looks as good as HD, and certanly upscaled looks superior than normal DVD image, nobody is saying that standart DVD is true 1080p but you have to recognize that if you configure your equipment to achieve the best quality out of it, you can get darn close to it and that's enough for most viewers.

Any upscaled image (even image from a normal DVD player) will result in mosquito noise, artifacting, etc. if your configurations are improper, if you don't use good connections to preserve a top digital signal, even the equipment could not be the best for the job... as i mentioned before, i saw astounding results on a Plasma screen compared to LCD screens, which supposed to be better... and that was playing a standart DVD movie with no upscaling.

A 40 inch LCD/Plasma screen measures aproximately 40 inches wide x 28 inches high... that's BIG!... big enough for normal viewing at 10 feet, and that's sufficient for most viewers. I don't think anybody would want to view any screen (regardless of its size) at 2-3 feet unless wants to suffer headackes, dizziness or losing sight.

Also, 5.1 PCM or DD plus surround could provide a minor improvement, but not enough to disregard standard 5.1 DD or DTS which already have great sound quality, the fact is that any sound mix depends greatly in your equipment, if you have a great home theater system, even better if independent and not part of a DVD player, you can achieve a fantastic surround enviroment.

Does all of this justify replacing your equipment and video library for HD DVD or Blu-ray players and movies? In my opinion, no, and the fact is that most consumers are not really interested in HD, because everybody hates spending money on stuff that they already own and really don't need to be replaced.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 26 Jun 2007 @ 1:38

1626.6.2007 5:22

Any signal that is displayed on a FPD will be upscaled to that sets native resolution. This happens whether or not the player is an upscaling player. An upscaled DVD is not HD, it may look ALMOST as good but you just can't add information to the signal that is not there. The quality depends a great deal more on your equipment, i.e. your set, signal processor, or player, than it does on the quality of your wires/connection. For the record, I am talking predominantly about HDMI, with which you either get the signal to the set or you don't.

Quote:
A 40 inch LCD/Plasma screen measures aproximately 40 inches wide x 28 inches high... that's BIG!... big enough for normal viewing at 10 feet, and that's sufficient for most viewers. I don't think anybody would want to view any screen (regardless of its size) at 2-3 feet unless wants to suffer headackes, dizziness or losing sight
Most screen size-to-viewing distace charts will recommend a set larger than 40" when viewing HD content at a distance of 10 feet (this has been discussed elsewhere in this forum). Perhaps if you were to watch this same video on a larger set, the flaws in the image may be exposed to a greater extent. The smaller the ser the closer together the pixels are, the less able you are to discern the fine details at a certain viewing distance when compared to a larger set. I can watch a DVD on my 23" LCD screen from 5 feet away and it looks great, crystal clear. I take that same image to my 60" SXRD set and the image is slightly softer with some noticeable added noise.

Quote:
Also, 5.1 PCM or DD plus surround could provide a minor improvement, but not enough to disregard standard 5.1 DD or DTS which already have great sound quality
The analog 5.1, IMO, provides a great deal of improvement over standard 5.1 DD or DTS, which is still a decent format. If your set-up allows I recommend you try the PCM format and decide for yourself.

Again, does this warrant replacing a video library with HD material, I'm not ready to go that far yet but anything new is in HD for me.

1726.6.2007 6:07

ChiknLitl
what hes saying is it looks good enough and the price is prefect...plus theres more movies on it...

1826.6.2007 13:18

I think this article over-estimates the effect of HD media and underestimates the effect of rentals.

I myself have seen my DVD purchases bottom out the last 12 months. The only SD DVD I have bought the past year is the boxed set of Season 2.5 of Battlestar Galactica - and that's becaused I missed recording some episodes on my DVR. Practically all of my SD DVD viewing has been from rentals and all of my disc purchases have been BluRay or HD-DVD.

Quote:
most consumers are not really interested in HD, because everybody hates spending money on stuff that they already own and really don't need to be replaced
This isn't the case with all HD buyers. The titles I buy on BluRay or HD-DVD are new releases or older titles that I don't have on regular DVD. So I'm not really replacing my old library (I have less than 50 SD DVD's in my collection) but I'm starting to expand my collection with new titles in 1080p.

It's also ironic that the only time my regular DVD's look "good enough" for me is when I play them on my Toshiba HD-XA2 HD-DVD player. ChicknLitl is right. Most enthusiasts agree that it's the best upconverting DVD player available right now.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 26 Jun 2007 @ 13:25

1927.6.2007 0:27

Thanks ZIppyDSM, you understand exactly what i'm saying... let's be clear about one thing, HD buyers represent 1% of DVD sales, which means that for every HD DVD and Blu-ray movie sold, 99 standart DVD movies are purchased, that was revealed in recent studies and sales stadistics, and shows us that most people don't care or need HD.

Regarding 5.1 PCM and DD plus compared to standard 5.1 DD and DTS, the fact is that any of these sound formats depend greatly of their studio mix, and all DVD reviews regarding sound quality in HD-DVD and Blu-ray versus standart DVD, have agreed that if there's an improvement in 5.1 PCM and DD plus, it's not substancial to dissmiss the quality in DTS or 5.1 DD.

Regarding the size of the screen, a 40 inch widescreen is more than sufficient to wiew from a decent distance in any room... be patient with me for a moment... imagine a 40" 16x9 LCD/Plasma widescreen is equal to having a 32" 4x3 CRT screen, but with added screen space to its sides... that's a BIG SCREEN that most viewers has purchased for their livingroom or bedroom, to watch their movies or TV broadcast at 10 feet away with no inconveniences.

If you're thinking in buying a 40" widescreen in the near future, it would be like replacing an old 32" CRT for a TV screen with equal height but with extra wid on its sides, and you'll not feel like you're mising something.

It's logical that if you were to watch a standart DVD movie, even TV broadcast on a 50-60 inch screen, the image will be softer and some degree of noise may appear, compared to a 40" or less screen where the pixels are closer together, but the point is that most viewers can't afford to buy such larger screens, and could be satisfied with a 40" screen that will provide a great picture for both standart DVD movies and future TV broadcast, specially since it will be 720p (not 1080p) and on larger than 40" screens, you may get a softer picture and you'll depend on the set's upscaler to increase quality.

Indeed any signal that is displayed on a LCD/Plasma FPD will be upscaled to that sets native resolution, but apparently Plasma screens do a better job than LCD screens, and if you add an upscaling player to the mix, you can get even better quality from standart DVD.

I agree that an upscaled DVD is not HD, but it looks as good as HD, and indeed you depend in your equipment, connections and configuration to get such results, you don't need to be a rocket scientist to know that you can get better quality from a HDMI digital signal than from a RCA analog signal.

Indeed the best upscaling player so far is the Toshiba HD-XA2 HD-DVD player, better than the Oppo players, but it's not because it's a HD-DVD player, rather because it has an excelent upscaler, even better than PS3 and Blu-ray players.

If Toshiba releases a standart DVD player with upscaling capacities, it will be the bestseller among its kind, because the fact is that consumers will prefer to spend $200 or less for a player that will increase picture quality of their standart DVD movie collection, than spending $400-800 for a HD DVD or Blu-ray player.

Also buyers must consider the prices of LCD and Plasma screens... LCD screens from 26" to 40" costs $1000-1500, but LCD screens from 46" to 50" costs $2500-4000, and that's more than an average buyer is willing to spend for entertaiment. Even so LCD supposed to be better than Plasma, i have seen astouning picture on Plasma screens which are cheaper than LCD screens, and clearly that doesn't mean that Plasma is inferior than LCD.

Of course prices of LCD/Plasma screens as well as HD-DVD/Blu-Ray movies and players could go down in the following years, but also prices for upscaling DVD players and standart DVD movies will go down alongside, making them more accesible and cheaper for all consumers.

If upscaling players became availible for $100 or less, and standart DVD movies for $10 or less, it won't matter if HD-DVD/Blu-Ray movies and players are cheaper in the future, consumer will preffer the cheapest option, specially if such option has, and still is, offering high audiovisual quality and achieved viewers/consumers acceptance for a decade.

The bottom line is that the so-called better, biggest and more expensive HD movies and equipment is not necesarily the best option for most consumers, the only reason for HD is to allow the companies sell more expensive 50" or larger screens, to impose a new format that's not really needed, and make consumers repurchase equipment and movie collections.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 27 Jun 2007 @ 0:54

2027.6.2007 6:09

ematrix, I completely understand your points. However I do disagree in two areas. First, can any image ever look "good enough"? This is just my personal opinion, but I think that as long as there are bigger and better images to be had out there, people will seek them. The HDTV segment of the electronics market is the fastest growing segment of the consumer electronics market. People are buying big T.V.'s.

The second point I disagree with is the comparison of the 40" HD set with 32" CRT. Poeple will generally agree that you need to sit farther from a crt set than from an HD set beacause of the lack of detail due to scan lines. To truely appreciate the differences between a standard DVD and any HD signal, view the format on a large screen. HD signals on a large screen help to add to the cinematic experience. If your viewing distance is 10 feet, with a forty inch screen the signals may look similiar, on a larger screen at that same distance or closer an HD signal really shines.

It's all in your personal preference and there is always a compromise in terms of quality-to-price. If that were not the case then I'd have a basement theater room instead of driving a car to work.

2127.6.2007 6:11

ematrix
Hdef formats BR and Hdvd are niches within niches still,theres no point in fooling with them unless you are super hardcore or rich.

Now the Newer Hdef players might offer the best upscaling and might be worth the price but frankly the mini niches need to become standardized before I will spend more than 200$ on them.

ChiknLitl
yes when the price diffrance is a few thousand bucks.

2227.6.2007 6:48

BluRay and HD DVD may be just niche markets at this time but it's where we'd rather be. Right now we're getting the very best video and audio ever offered to the consumer.

Up conversion has it's merits but when we watch upconverted discs there's always that nagging feeling that there's something out there that's better so why should I settle for this?

The few of us who have adopted the new HD formats are happy where we are. We have the equipment to take advantage of the better video and audio and we feel that it's worth it.

If a newer format comes along in a few years that offers increased resolution or increased storage or other improvements then you can bet we'll be the first in line at our local A/V dealers eager to try the new stuff.

2327.6.2007 7:04

Originally posted by eatsushi:
BluRay and HD DVD may be just niche markets at this time but it's where we'd rather be. Right now we're getting the very best video and audio ever offered to the consumer.

Up conversion has it's merits but when we watch upconverted discs there's always that nagging feeling that there's something out there that's better so why should I settle for this?

The few of us who have adopted the new HD formats are happy where we are. We have the equipment to take advantage of the better video and audio and we feel that it's worth it.

If a newer format comes along in a few years that offers increased resolution or increased storage or other improvements then you can bet we'll be the first in line at our local A/V dealers eager to try the new stuff.
someone has to sacrifice and be the early adapter I guess 0-o

Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Lets renegotiate them.

---
Check out my crappy creations
http://zippydsmlee.deviantart.com/

2428.6.2007 0:56

ZIppyDSM i totally agree with you, Blu-ray and HD-DVD are niches within niches, and there's no point in fooling with them, when there are other options to achieve similar maybe even equal results, unless you are super hardcore or rich who doesn't mind being a early adapter, a beta tester of a format that might never become standardized.

While video hardware suppliers continue to re-adjust plans on the Blu-ray Disc/HD DVD front, consumers appear to be more than content with conventional DVD players, according to recent figures provided in May 2007 by the Digital Entertainment Group (DEG).

Based on data from the Consumer Electronics Association, retailers, and manufacturers, DEG estimates that eight million standart DVD players were sold to U.S. customers from January through March of this year, the highest volume since the fourth quarter of 2001. Overall, some 203 million standart DVD players have been sold to consumers since the format launched in 1997.

By contrast, Toshiba announced that it has sold 150,000 standalone HD-DVD players since HD DVD’s launch, plus 155,000 Xbox 360 HD DVD add-ons were sold in the U.S. and even so every HD DVD player or drive is purchased with the intention of playing movies, Microsoft has never claimed or accounted that every Xbox 360 is a potencial HD-DVD player.

According to Consumer Electronics Daily, 100,000 standalone Blu-ray players were sold in the US, although Sony has insisted to account 1.5 million PlayStation 3 game consoles sold in the US as Blu-ray Disc players, when in fact the Blu-ray reading capabilities on the PS3 are forced on their consumers at a high cost, and record sales show that PS3 game console consumers have preferred it for playing videogames rather than movies.

Record sales show that 5.27 million PS3 videogames have been sold in the US since its release in November 2006, Resistance: Fall of Man being the bestselling PS3 with 730,000 copies sold, which means that this videogame alone has sold more copies than all the Blu-ray movies purchased in the same period.

In the other hand, Xbox 360 since its release last year has sold 6.41 million game consoles, and 40.66 million videogames in the US, Gears of War being the bestseller with 2.77 million copies sold.

Nintendo's Wii has sold 3.46 million game consoles and 14.66 million videogames in the US since its release in November 2006, Wii Sports being the bestseller Wii with 3.46 million sold.

DVD movies sales are still going strong as well while Blu-ray and HD-DVD titles trickle out of the gate. The 1.2 million Blu-ray and HD-DVD discs sold in Q1 2007 was less than 1 percent of the 414.4 million DVD titles sold in the same period. Since the launch of HD DVD more than a year ago, 2.14 million Blu-ray and HD-DVD discs have sold compared with 1.675 billion standart DVDs in the 10-year life of the format, according to DEG figures.

Blockbuster announced that it will make Blu-Ray movies availible on their online rental and stores, but quickly assured that it will continue to offer HD-DVD movies, and will continue to do so as long as the costumers continue to ask for them.

The newer HD players might offer the best upscaling over the Oppo player line, and if prices for HD-DVD and Blu-ray players drop, it wont be enough to spend more than $200 on a HD upscaling player, if you consider that prices for upscaling SD DVD players are dropping to $100 or less, more improved models are being availible and their popularity is increasing among consumers.

Consumers are buying more LCD and Plasma TV sets than years ago, but records sales show that buyers preffer a 40" or less LCD/Plasma screen, and aren't interested in using them for playing HD-DVD and Blu-ray movies, rather to play current standart DVD movies, playing videogames and for digital TV broadcast.

ChiknLitl, the comparison of the 40" HD set with 32" CRT is regarding the size and dimensions of the screen, but you keep reffering as to truely appreciate the differences between a standard DVD and any HD signal, you need to view the format on an even larger screen, but numbers show that most consumers really don't need or want such larger screens to enjoy a movie with rich detail, color saturation, richness, and definition.

The bottom line is that numbers show that even so there are bigger and better images to be had out there, more than 99% of consumers aren't interested in getting them, nor willing to spend thousands of dollars for HD equipment and movies.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 01 Jul 2007 @ 21:19

2528.6.2007 5:00

Quote:
ChiknLitl, the comparison of the 40" HD set with 32" CRT is regarding the size and dimensions of the screen, but you keep reffering as to truely appreciate the differences between a standard DVD and any HD signal, you need to view the format on an even larger screen, but numbers show that most consumers really don't need or want such larger screens to enjoy a movie with rich detail, color saturation, richness, and definition.
The reason I bring that up is because you had mentioned that you saw a DVD playing on a 1080p 40" set..

Quote:
I recently viewed a movie on a 40 inch 1080p Plasma and it looked spectacular, not only i was surprised that it looked much better than similar LCD screens playing the same signal
Indeed, the image may have been impressive. My point was that at that screen size the differences between HD and DVD are not as appreciable, that's all.

2628.6.2007 20:32
mdhimes
Inactive

I gotta say (to this anlyst about DVD sales down """). A lot has to do with the movie quality content. Hasn't been all that great. I know that MY purchase rate has been less and less this year compared to last year. But I agree with those who said current DVD's will be around for a while.

Also, there have been more DVD piracy's across the globe this year over last, which "gouges" the total sales market.

More interestingly enough, I have taken some home movies for myself and friends/family and written them to DVD's. Now at my house, I have 3 DVD players (2 Sony's hold 400 DVD's and one holds 5 DVD. All my players are capable of reading DVD ROM, DVD-/+ R and DVD-/+ RW. I can't even count the number of times my friends and neighbors say "But your DVD won't PLAY on my player", Turns out, most of them have fairly older (and cheap) DVD players. They never checked the specs to be sure it would play ALL the formats. MY next door neighbor, NEVER has a problem reading them.

Any, the point here is that a lot of people (at least the many that I know) are NOT interested in the Next-next-next generations yet !T Their take is "new players cost so much more ($$$$) and to get the benefits, need better TV's ($$$$), Blue Ray/HD DVD's ($$$$). I think you can put the rest of this message together on your own......

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