AfterDawn: Tech news

Samsung developing 3rd Gen Blu-ray player

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 11 Jul 2007 5:30 User comments (15)

Samsung developing 3rd Gen Blu-ray player Just months after its second-generation Blu-ray Disc player hit the streets, Samsung already has a third generation version in the works.
The company will display the model, the BD-P1400, during the 2007 IFA consumer electronics conference in Berlin on Aug. 31, confirmed a company representative.

The player is expected to support Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby True HD and DTS-HD audio formats. The BD-P1400 also should boast a built-in Ethernet port, which had been the most notable upgrade for the second-generation Samsung BD-P1200 over the company’s first-generation BD-P1000.

If the new Samsung player ships to retail after Oct. 31, it will be mandated by the Blu-ray Disc Assn. that it include certain features that were not required of Blu-ray models that streeted prior to that cut-off date. One new required enhancement will be the capability to playback picture-in-picture, in which one separate stream of video runs currently with the running feature film. To date, no Blu-ray stand-alone features picture-in-picture playback. HD DVD hardware has been required to handle this feature since the launch of the format last year.

Source: Video Business

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15 user comments

111.7.2007 7:09
hughjars
Inactive

Hmmmm, still coy about prices.

Am I surprised about a a 1.1 profile compliant Samusng Blu-ray player
(cos none of the Samsung BD-only players they make at the moment are)?

Not really.

But I suspect sales numbers will not be amazing (as has been the case so far even with the best selling BD stand-alone = Samsung BDP1000.

The PS3 might not be selling as a games console but it's killed the BD stand-alone market - and the recent $100 price cut won't make the rest of the BD producers feel any better about the market (so much so the Panasonic have said that they are not even going to bother releasing a new player).

It'll be interesting how Sony play this cos the S300 isn't profile 1.1 compliant.

211.7.2007 8:18

What could the ethernet port possibly be used for? I can see the MPAA launching complaints against the possibilities. My DVR has an ehternet and USB port, but they are not activated because of copywrite laws. The instruction manual even points that out.

311.7.2007 8:25
westbrom
Inactive

could be used to more protection on havin enthernet

411.7.2007 8:43

The ethernet port is part of the the BD-Live 2.0 profile and allows for downloadable content and online interactivity.

All HD DVD players already have an ethernet port used mostly for firmware updates. A few titles feature online interactivity and web content:

http://www.afterdawn.com/news/archive/10213.cfm

511.7.2007 14:07
hughjars
Inactive

Come on now folks, it's not a hard one to guess; the biggest use of the ethernet connection will be BD+ updates.

They can shovel as much of the old "downloadable content" and "online connectivity" BS as they like but you can bet the really big deal come right back down to increased 'security'.

Enjoy.

611.7.2007 15:53
dblbogey7
Inactive

Originally posted by hughjars:
the biggest use of the ethernet connection will be BD+ updates.

This is a common misconception about the implementation of BD+. The truth is you do not need to be connected to the internet for BD+ to be activated:

http://www.cryptography.com/technology/spdc/bluray.html

Quote:
Since BD+ Content Code is delivered via the disc, an internet connection is not required and the BD+ platform works in offline environments while respecting the privacy of legitimate consumers.

Even those BluRay players without ethernet ports will be affected by BD+.

711.7.2007 15:57
hughjars
Inactive

Originally posted by dblbogey7:
This is a common misconception about the implementation of BD+. The truth is you do not need to be connected to the internet for BD+ to be activated:

Even those BluRay players without ethernet ports will be affected by BD+.
- That's why I said updates.

The big deal with BD+ is meant to be it's ability to evolve from 'both ends' (on the discs and thru the player) to meet whatever they decide is a current or new threat.

811.7.2007 16:13
dblbogey7
Inactive

Quote:
That's why I said updates.
Updates to the BD+ Interpreter or Virtual Machine would most likely come with firmware updates sent through update discs.

Updates to the actual BD+ content code will come with the BluRay movie discs.

Read the link again. You don't need an internet connection to get updated BD+ VM or content code.

912.7.2007 6:51
hughjars
Inactive

I'm not sure what you are trying to get at here but feel free to point out what was incorrect with what I said.....

Quote:
it's ability to evolve from 'both ends' (on the discs and thru the player) to meet whatever they decide is a current or new threat.
Clearly I specifically acknowledged the side disc updates will play but a direct internet link to the player is also an option to update BD+, is it not?
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 12 Jul 2007 @ 6:53

1012.7.2007 7:25

Quote:
a direct internet link to the player is also an option to update BD+, is it not?
Yes it can be but as dblbogey pointed out it's not needed for BD+ updates since the actual BD+ content code will be on the disc itself.

Your first contention that "the biggest use of the ethernet connection will be BD+ updates" is therefore incorrect.

1112.7.2007 7:30
hughjars
Inactive

Originally posted by eatsushi)Your first contention that "the biggest use of the ethernet connection will be BD+ updates" is therefore incorrect.[/quote:
- Well we'll just have to wait and see then won't we?

I've never said they would not use the disc method.

But frankly I don't just believe everything they've said or written about this 'security system'; time will tell just how many of those updates and revisions come via the net link.

1212.7.2007 7:35

Quote:
time will tell just how many of those updates and revisions come via the net link.
Very little I would imagine since a great majority of standalones right now don't have an ethernet port.

1312.7.2007 7:38
hughjars
Inactive

Originally posted by eatsushi:

Very little I would imagine since a great majority of standalones right now don't have an ethernet port.
- Very little period, if the Blu-ray stand-alones continue to bomb. ;)

But let's not kid ourselves here, they have big plans for that cr@p should things go their way.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 12 Jul 2007 @ 7:38

1417.7.2007 1:58

Everything will soon have a connection to the net for easy free updates in a way this is great news for the consumer.

1518.8.2007 12:16

Another reason to wait on jumping on the HD bandwagon. When they finally iron out all of the "features" they are going to implement, then I'll upgrade.

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