AfterDawn: Tech news

UK minister warns ISPs to curb piracy

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 24 Oct 2007 9:43 User comments (18)

UK minister warns ISPs to curb piracy Lord Triesman, parliamentary Under Secretary for Innovation, Universities, and Skills in the U.K. said yesterday that if ISPs don't get copyright infringement by their customers under control, legislation will be passed to resolve the issue. He told the BBC "If we can't get voluntary arrangements we will legislate."
"For the most part I think there are going to be successful voluntary schemes between the creative industries and ISPs. Our preferred position is that we shouldn't have to regulate," he said.

A spokesman for the the Internet Service Providers Association says "ISPs cannot monitor or record the type of information passed over their network. ISPs are no more able to inspect and Filter every single Packet passing across their network than the Post Office is able to open every envelope." He added "ISPs deal with many more packets of data each day than postal services and data protection legislation actually prevents ISPs from looking at the content of the packets sent."

He did add, however "ISPA does not support abuses of copyright and intellectual property theft."

While Triesman says he's not interested in "hounding 14-year-olds who shared music," but rather catching individuals engaged in commercial piracy operations, that statement would seem to paint him as either ignorant or lying. While there are legitimate questions about copyright infringement on the internet, the type of piracy he's talking about doesn't happen on residential broadband services. It involves billions of dollars worth of CD/DVD pressing plants, as well as shipping and distribution channels. None of that is being done, or in fact can be done across the internet.

Source: BBC News

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18 user comments

124.10.2007 11:56
manrod
Inactive

I get 40 GB a month download allowance (TalkTalk (U.K)), so what else am I going to do other than download things.

In the U.K we have it pretty good when it comes to downloading things, they don't bother you if it's for your own use, but if you sell it they rape you, Gary Glitter style!

224.10.2007 12:33

Originally posted by manrod:
but if you sell it they rape you, Gary Glitter style!
With his song playing in the background :-P

324.10.2007 14:05
nobrainer
Inactive

If the files are encrypted there is no way to tell what the file is just that it is p2p or http ect, but a government sponsored fascist state of blocking any content they like could be having the foundations laid in the guise of terrorism,,, oopps i mean piracy!

424.10.2007 14:56

You know whats gonna happen one by one,come time? ISP's will force you to declare everything and any encrypted packets( edit for Gradical: NOT DECLARED) will be refused entry on the server side. And guess what, you all know, that the majority of internet users will say " no problem, look at my private stuff if you want I have nothing to hide" This was an argument I had with someone recently, but when I explained its a privacy issue then he took a moment to ponder after I asked him " is it ok to wake up in the morning, to find someone from the local government having a quick look round yer bedroom?" "if not then whats the difference?"
Now of course there will always be ways round ISP's trying to spy on you, but if most of the ignorant folks don't mind then this will quickly, become cast in stone and the powers that be will be all over everyone LEGALLY like a rash, or flies round shite if you would be so kind to pardon the expression. The future looks bleak, technology and innovation, thwarted by the corporate media junkies. 1 last comment, how many ISP's will be left when they are faced with the daunting thought of having to install terrabyte upon terrabyte of HDD's to log everything, and how much is that gonna cost us in the long run, I can see the monthly premiums going sky-high. Maybe the customer will see this, but I doubt it, just more money for the powers to be

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 24 Oct 2007 @ 17:05

524.10.2007 15:30

Yeah thats a good one, no encrypted data, the that would be a hacker heaven hahaha, just imagine that, all you need to do is to hack into the isp and you´re good to go, one server to rule them all hehehehe

624.10.2007 17:03

Yeah man I didn't explain myself to the full eh!! I meant encrypted data that hasn't been declared and ah suppose checked/declared by Microsoft( or the owner of the O's not the licence user) or the ISP, for illegal content. Of course I didn't mean, no encryption, with regards to all internet traffic. But then again some mothers do have them!!

724.10.2007 18:44

there's a lot going on over the net and there should be rules tought, there are people selling software, music movies on the street making money from what they don't own and i do care cuz it's bad for the little soft company or the artist featuring a 1st album

824.10.2007 18:49

"For the most part I think there are going to be successful voluntary schemes between the creative industries and ISPs. Our preferred position is that we shouldn't have to regulate," he said."
I think the more they squeeze to gain control of something that they never did have control on the faster technology will increase and hacker expertise to circumvent them will rise. They just don't get it.

924.10.2007 20:36

Originally posted by badkrma:
"For the most part I think there are going to be successful voluntary schemes between the creative industries and ISPs. Our preferred position is that we shouldn't have to regulate," he said."
I think the more they squeeze to gain control of something that they never did have control on the faster technology will increase and hacker expertise to circumvent them will rise. They just don't get it.
And joe public?
Who will ultimately decide whats gonna happen? The peeps that know or the peeps that don't?

1024.10.2007 22:55

You can ask and warn the isp's however its still up to the user to change their habbits or not :P

1125.10.2007 5:51

Originally posted by nobrainer:
If the files are encrypted there is no way to tell what the file is just that it is p2p or http ect, but a government sponsored fascist state of blocking any content they like could be having the foundations laid in the guise of terrorism,,, oopps i mean piracy!
Encrypted and private p2p seems to be the safest and best alternative these days. GigaTribe is the best app I've found so far that does this (but I'd be happy to know if there's better solutions out there): www.gigatribe.com

1225.10.2007 5:57
nobrainer
Inactive

Originally posted by themboots :
Originally posted by nobrainer:
If the files are encrypted there is no way to tell what the file is just that it is p2p or http ect, but a government sponsored fascist state of blocking any content they like could be having the foundations laid in the guise of terrorism,,, oopps i mean piracy!
Encrypted and private p2p seems to be the safest and best alternative these days. GigaTribe is the best app I've found so far that does this (but I'd be happy to know if there's better solutions out there): www.gigatribe.com

there are a few, allpeers is a great firefox extension add-on http://www.allpeers.com/press.php

http://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/3234

easy to set up your own dark net that will never be flagged by any **aa. or the American controlled world police!

"America is the only law, and you will obey"
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 25 Oct 2007 @ 6:02

1325.10.2007 6:55

I know about AllPeers, but I don't like being forced into downloading a different browser. I know a lot of people like FireFox, but I've never had any problems with IE and don't want to switch, not yet anyways...

1425.10.2007 7:09
nobrainer
Inactive

Originally posted by themboots:
I know about AllPeers, but I don't like being forced into downloading a different browser. I know a lot of people like FireFox, but I've never had any problems with IE and don't want to switch, not yet anyways...
The problem i have with IE is all the scripting and adds active x, tracking cookies ect that with firefox and:

1. addblock: http://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/1865
2. noscript: http://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/722

are easily stopped. even afterdawn is full of tracking doubleclick adds as is most other web sites. a single click on noscript shows you all the hidden tracking content on a page and allows you to block whatever you want.

then you add the tor button for easy controll of anonymity while you brows, which is a necesitary with the usa spying on everyone now.

Tor: http://www.torproject.org/
Tor Button: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/2275

if you want to run tor you need to download the proxy part from the homepage, the firefox plug-in is just an easy on/off button!
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 25 Oct 2007 @ 7:18

1525.10.2007 11:44
hughjars
Inactive

While Triesman says he's not interested in "hounding 14-year-olds who shared music," but rather catching individuals engaged in commercial piracy operations, that statement would seem to paint him as either ignorant or lying.

- My bet is on yet another out-of-touch old fart reading a script who has given the matter not the slightest thought.

Hopefully the UK will continue to leave private users alone.....if they don't the UK internet might as well close down around 90% of it's operations cos without P2P & bittorrents most of us can happily go back to dial-up (and pay buttons for it too).

But I'm pretty sure they're not for seeing an e-stoneage UK and the ISP industry destroyed just because the already enormously wealthy music and film industry can't contain their own ludicrous greed?

1626.10.2007 7:40

Quote:
While Triesman says he's not interested in "hounding 14-year-olds who shared music," but rather catching individuals engaged in commercial piracy operations, that statement would seem to paint him as either ignorant or lying.
Both, he is a politician! He really dosen't give a rat's ass about any of this but companies have put money in his re-election fund.

What are the ISPs supposed to do? P2P is real nasty to monitor. How are you easily going to check if a packet comes from something that is copywrited? The cost of 'doing it right' would be astronimical. It would be far easier to relax the copywrite laws, which are insaine. Brittian went from 50 years to 75 years of protection because the media maffia lined the pockets of the politicians. Patents are only good for 17 years in the USA. They represent large investments in resorces. Copywrites protect an idea that usually comes in a flash. Why do they need 6 times the time to recoupe their losses when there aren't any? This whole thing is BS!

1726.10.2007 7:52

While Triesman says he's not interested in "hounding 14-year-olds who shared music," but rather catching individuals engaged in commercial piracy operations

Defo dont agree with that, so many people have been caught now and how many big people? I guess its under 20 lol!



1826.10.2007 15:56

I dont know if there are many peeps here grasping what I am saying(or maybe they just dont give a toss). When the media mafia use scare tactics, red-herings or smoke screens to convince people that privacy should be policed, then the politicians will wave their political wands and we are all up shit creak with no paddle. Forget what hackers are up to, cause most file sharers will be stopped dead in their tracks and there will be loads of building-contractors constructing jails all over the place. The attitude of to hell with them and whatever scheme they come up with the uber hackers will sort us all out is bullshit. We the people have elected these fu***rs, and only we can change it.

1 2 1234 I PREDICT A RIOT, I PREDICT A RIOT
he he he come on lets start 1
Seriously though, ah value my privacy, how about you?

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 26 Oct 2007 @ 15:59

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