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UK retailers losing sales battle to DRM

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 23 Nov 2007 18:34 User comments (4)

UK retailers losing sales battle to DRM Responding to declining U.K. music sales, the Entertainment Retailers Association - an organization representing music retailers, is blaming digital copy protection for the slow pace at which consumers have embraced downloaded music.
ERA director Kim Bayley told the Financial Times this week that the copy protection mechanisms are "stifling growth and working against the consumer interest." Citing a recent study conducted in the UK which indicated that consumers overwhelmingly prefer music without copy protection mechanisms, Bayley says that DRM "puts consumers off."

According to an article in the Financial Times the music industry counts on fourth quarter sales for 40% of its annual revenue, but so far the slower than usual period leading up to the Christmas buying season have many retailers concerned that sales will be lower than anticipated this year.

Although it's questionable at how much DRM affects online music sales, it's clear that consumers have had an overwhelmingly positive reaction to DRM-free downloads, such as those pioneered by EMI. Maybe now it's time to ask why we have to settle for losslessly encoded files.

Source: Ars Technica

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4 user comments

126.11.2007 6:58
ali2007
Inactive

yup DRM sucks send the message out.

226.11.2007 21:33

What a bunch of dumbasses why waste time going to the shops when you can download it instead,if the retailers had any business sense then they'd offer downloadable content on their websites but i guess common sense is seriously lacking these days

330.11.2007 7:41

scorpNZ they use all their mental powers trying to screw you. If they want to sell music they need to sell loseless unprotected music.

420.12.2007 5:33

This is old news people already know that this is the case and they have all this to have no drm at all.

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