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SanDisk doubles CompactFlash memory to 16GB

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 07 Mar 2008 9:58 User comments (9)

SanDisk doubles CompactFlash memory to 16GB SanDisk has announced that it has doubled the capacity of its CompactFlash 5000 flash memory cards for industrial markets. The cards provide a high level of durability as well as high read and write speeds, and the extra capacity makes it a more suitable accessory for mission-critical applications including medical instruments, military applications and gaming systems.
The new 16GB CompactFlash card was unveiled at the CeBIT trade fair in Hannover, Germany this week. An 8GB version of the product was unveiled last spring. It is designed by SanDisk to achieve a sustained read and write performance of up to 30 megabytes (MB) per second. It supports a transfer mode of up to UDMA 4, an industry standard that enables high data transfer rates and includes performance boosters and on-the-fly error detection.

"There's a substantial market for this type of industrial-strength card in mission-critical applications, especially those in harsh environments," said Scott Deutsch, vice president of OEM sales and marketing for SanDisk. "In addition to providing high-performance and high-capacity, the CompactFlash 5000 is a mass storage solution that can be trusted to meet the demands of industrial users and applications."

Using SanDisk's patented flash management technology - such as back block management, error detection and error correction code (EDC/ECC), the card provides reliability even in extreme temperatures that can range from -13 degrees to 185 degrees Fahrenheit (-25 to +85 Celsius). It is available in fixed or removable configurations.

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9 user comments

17.3.2008 14:55

Hmmmmm.....but....

Price? What would a 16-gig memory card go for in the stores? What's the projected cost? 16 gigs on a tiny card is pretty impressive stuff and would pack quite a punch for consumer apps, but is there any pricing info?

And why are these only targeted for business applicatons? ("for industrial markets"). What about us "domestic market" people? Shouldn't we get to buy them too?

28.3.2008 3:47

Hey Kilgy,

Press release gave no release details at all whether it was a date, price or where they'd be initially available to buy. I think they will be pretty expensive though, they are made to work in some fairly crappy... or so we're told, I'm pretty sure has done an independent side by side comparison to CompactFlash and all the others. ;-)

38.3.2008 7:17

Originally posted by Dela:
Hey Kilgy,

Press release gave no release details at all whether it was a date, price or where they'd be initially available to buy. I think they will be pretty expensive though, they are made to work in some fairly crappy... or so we're told, I'm pretty sure has done an independent side by side comparison to CompactFlash and all the others. ;-)
That's unfortunate. They sure don't appear to be crappy in terms of performance specs, ie :

- suitable accessory for mission-critical applications
- sustained read and write operations
- high data transfer rate (30 MB/second)
- on-the-fly error detection
- back block management.....error correction code
- reliability in temperature extremes (-25 ~ +85 celsius)

At 16 gigabytes, you could even use a tiny card like this (in, say, a camera) to record substancial amounts of 1080p HD video!

48.3.2008 8:28

Good heavens!

These '5000 Series' cards from Sandisk must be a new high-tech breed or something, otherwise ....

If you don't mind a 20MB/sec datarate throughput, you can get a 32GB QMemory/Toshiba card for $168.99 US.

http://www.flash-memory-store.com/32gb-q...sh-cf-card.html


This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 08 Mar 2008 @ 9:10

58.3.2008 15:00

Quote:
That's unfortunate. They sure don't appear to be crappy in terms of performance specs
Woops, I actually meant to say in crappy conditions, not that they were crappy.

68.3.2008 17:11

Quote:
mission-critical applications including medical instruments, military applications and gaming systems.
I wonder when they decided a video game system was considered "mission-critical"? :P

78.3.2008 21:59

Quote:
Quote:
mission-critical applications including medical instruments, military applications and gaming systems.
I wonder when they decided a video game system was considered "mission-critical"? :P
(LOL) Well!

With all the heated debates positively raging here in the Games Forums, and the zillions of daily posts being made about the finer points of XBox and PS3, I have come to the realization that many-many-many people simply cannot live a single day without their gaming consoles! :)

810.3.2008 12:44

ye... believe it or not that was listed along with everything else on press release so...

910.3.2008 14:37

Originally posted by Dela:
ye... believe it or not that was listed along with everything else on press release so...
On the bus (I guess that would be 'lorry' or 'Metro' in Ireland <gg>) last week, I heard one young fellow curse under-his-breath, because he had been so wrapped-up in his portable game machine, that he had missed his stop! (LOL)

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