AfterDawn: Tech news

Universal unveils audio plans for Blu-ray

Written by Dave Horvath @ 01 May 2008 13:32 User comments (35)

Universal unveils audio plans for Blu-ray Coming up on their deadline to become a Blu-ray only production house, Universal has unveiled its plans for the audio it intends to use on the format. Ever since their defection from the HD-DVD camp, they've been working on a way to maximize the 50Gb worth of space available to them on BD-50 discs.
When working for the HD-DVD group, Universal had slapped together some audio configurations with heavy reliance on Dolby Digital Plus lossy audio, instead of the promised Dolby TrueHD audio. Now with their enthusiasm for the winner of the format war, Blu-ray users will see the first of many discs come out encoded in DTS-HD Master Lossless Audio.

The first discs that will see this treatment are a re-release of The Mummy series, previously already released on HD-DVD with only Dolby Digital Plus 5.1 audio tracks, and not Dolby TrueHD tracks. These titles are expected to hit the shelves on July 22nd.

In a press discussion, Universal told journalists that it will press to ensure that Dolby DTS-HD Master Lossless Audio becomes the Blu-ray standard for consumers.

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35 user comments

11.5.2008 14:49

Um..where the hell is Jurassic Park?! No one gives a $hit about the farkin Mummy series.

21.5.2008 14:52

and they do give a $hit about Jurassic park Trilogy ?

damn ! There are more twelve year olds in here than I thought ! - Time for a paedophile alert Police scan of the Afterdawn forums to make it safer for them :P

31.5.2008 15:01
goodswipe
Inactive

Originally posted by domie:
and they do give a $hit about Jurassic park Trilogy ?

damn ! There are more twelve year olds in here than I thought ! - Time for a paedophile alert Police scan of the Afterdawn forums to make it safer for them :P
LOL...

JP part one was alright, after that they kinda went down hill. That little kid always did annoy me though. They should have thrown his @ss to the dinosaurs.

That's Dino DNA..
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 01 May 2008 @ 15:03

41.5.2008 15:10
nobrainer
Inactive

all video on blu-ray should be mpge4 with dts true HD audio, otherwise whats the point.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 01 May 2008 @ 15:11

51.5.2008 15:20

Although Close Encounters of the Third Kind has already been released on BluRay, Spielberg is notorious for taking his time when releasing his films on a new format. Remember the Indy trilogy on DVD? Everything has to be done right and evrything has to be pre-approved by him.

Of all the Spielberg films, I'd prefer Saving Private Ryan, Jaws, and Empire of the Sun ahead of the Jurassic and Indy trilogies.

On topic though, this announcement from Universal is excellent. I actually wouldn't mind replacing some of my Universal HD DVD's that have DD+ if they're re-released with DTS HD-MA.

Now give us the Unrated Extended Edition of American Gangster with DTS HD-MA.

61.5.2008 15:55

Originally posted by nobrainer:
all video on blu-ray should be mpge4 with dts true HD audio, otherwise whats the point.
I disagree with the DTS or the True HD. Not all films require lossless audio.

Example: An old catlog title like Casablanca (1942) or The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) - both released on HD DVD - do not require lossless audio since the originals were in mono. Low-key modern dramas or comedies where it's mostly dialogue (like The 40-Year Old Virgin and Michael Clayton) will also not benefit from a lossless soundtrack.

Action/adventure titles are different. Films like Independence Day, I Robot, and AVP:Requiem (all of which have DTS HD-MA) will benefit from lossless.

71.5.2008 20:34

Quote:
Originally posted by nobrainer:
all video on blu-ray should be mpge4 with dts true HD audio, otherwise whats the point.


I disagree with the DTS or the True HD. Not all films require lossless audio.

Example: An old catlog title like Casablanca (1942) or The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) - both released on HD DVD - do not require lossless audio since the originals were in mono. Low-key modern dramas or comedies where it's mostly dialogue (like The 40-Year Old Virgin and Michael Clayton) will also not benefit from a lossless soundtrack.

Action/adventure titles are different. Films like Independence Day, I Robot, and AVP:Requiem (all of which have DTS HD-MA) will benefit from lossless.


well put! i have always thought that films with special effects deserve more quality than romantic comedies.

81.5.2008 22:30
varnull
Inactive

And how many people will even notice the difference? Most peoples hearing is 20% down by age 30.

Just more BS from the studios who can't come up with anything actually worth watching any more. The last great film I saw was Van Helsing... since then just low production value spinoffs and remakes..

And then there are the releases of old goop like Casablanca.. grainy original film stock, mono clipped hissy soundtrack..... may as well watch it on a 25 year old vhs machine.
Sorry Universal.. you don't make films worth watching.. I can't even be bothered pirating them any more. Go on... go BR only by the end of the year. I'm sure total worldwide disk sales of a couple hundred thousand will really impress the shareholders.... I will enjoy watching you fizzle out within 12 months.. idiots.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 01 May 2008 @ 22:32

91.5.2008 23:29

Originally posted by varnull:
And how many people will even notice the difference? Most peoples hearing is 20% down by age 30.

Just more BS from the studios who can't come up with anything actually worth watching any more. The last great film I saw was Van Helsing... since then just low production value spinoffs and remakes..

And then there are the releases of old goop like Casablanca.. grainy original film stock, mono clipped hissy soundtrack..... may as well watch it on a 25 year old vhs machine.
Sorry Universal.. you don't make films worth watching.. I can't even be bothered pirating them any more. Go on... go BR only by the end of the year. I'm sure total worldwide disk sales of a couple hundred thousand will really impress the shareholders.... I will enjoy watching you fizzle out within 12 months.. idiots.
ok let's go back to vcr i can't see the difernce . ...... ....., get a decent system and u'll catch up the idea
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 01 May 2008 @ 23:31

101.5.2008 23:31

Originally posted by varnull:
The last great film I saw was Van Helsing.



http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/van_helsing/

T-Meter Critics - 22%
Top Critics - 16%

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112.5.2008 0:04
dblbogey7
Inactive

Originally posted by eatsushi:
On topic though, this announcement from Universal is excellent. I actually wouldn't mind replacing some of my Universal HD DVD's that have DD+ if they're re-released with DTS HD-MA.

Now give us the Unrated Extended Edition of American Gangster with DTS HD-MA.
For those of us with the equipment (and the ears) to notice the difference, this is indeed excellent news.

...and +1 on American Gangster Unrated Extended Edition with DTS HD Master Audio.

122.5.2008 5:21
nobrainer
Inactive

Originally posted by eatsushi:
Originally posted by nobrainer:
all video on blu-ray should be mpge4 with dts true HD audio, otherwise whats the point.
I disagree with the DTS or the True HD. Not all films require lossless audio.

Example: An old catlog title like Casablanca (1942) or The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) - both released on HD DVD - do not require lossless audio since the originals were in mono. Low-key modern dramas or comedies where it's mostly dialogue (like The 40-Year Old Virgin and Michael Clayton) will also not benefit from a lossless soundtrack.

Action/adventure titles are different. Films like Independence Day, I Robot, and AVP:Requiem (all of which have DTS HD-MA) will benefit from lossless.
so really old films that were shot in technicolor and in mono sound benefit the consumer from the blu-ray rehash how exactly then?

why not purchase it on dvd for £4 instead of lining the studios pockets by purchasing the £20 blu-ray, with media that is now in the public domain! BTW public domain = free and legal to download.

another fine example of the rip off corporations using a new medium to inflate prices because its new it most be better and obviously costs more regardless of the fact that the films being re-released can now be reduced in cost because they have already recouped their costs and made their profit for the studios.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 02 May 2008 @ 5:27

132.5.2008 5:55

Quote:
Originally posted by eatsushi:
Originally posted by nobrainer:
all video on blu-ray should be mpge4 with dts true HD audio, otherwise whats the point.
I disagree with the DTS or the True HD. Not all films require lossless audio.

Example: An old catlog title like Casablanca (1942) or The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) - both released on HD DVD - do not require lossless audio since the originals were in mono. Low-key modern
dramas or comedies where it's mostly dialogue (like The 40-Year Old Virgin and Michael Clayton) will also not benefit from a lossless soundtrack.

Action/adventure titles are different. Films like Independence Day, I Robot, and AVP:Requiem (all of which have DTS HD-MA) will benefit from lossless.
so really old films that were shot in technicolor and in mono sound benefit the consumer from the blu-ray rehash how exactly then?

why not purchase it on dvd for £4 instead of lining the studios pockets by purchasing the £20 blu-ray, with media that is now in the public domain! BTW public domain = free and legal to download.

another fine example of the rip off corporations using a new medium to inflate prices because its new it most be better and obviously costs more regardless of the fact that the films being re-released can now be reduced in cost because they have already recouped their costs and made their profit for the studios.
Film is equivalent to about 4K resolution. So why so you think it would look better compressed down to 720, like it is on a DVD?

Also just because the audio is mono doesn’t mean you won't notice a difference in sound quality.
Compression is the enemy.

142.5.2008 7:25

Originally posted by nobrainer:
all video on blu-ray should be mpge4 with dts true HD audio, otherwise whats the point.
Define what you mean by MPEG4? You do know there is many ways the name "MPEG4" can be used, don't you?

MPEG4 part2 (SP/ASP): Is a video stream format utilising h263 quantization, eg: DivX, Xvid etc.
MPEG4 part 10 (AVC): Is a video stream format utilising h264 quantization. AVC is the acronym for Advanced Video Codec. This is one of the three mandatory video codecs that Blu-ray/HD-DVD players support (I am guessing this is the format you are referring to).
MPEG4 part 3 (AAC): This is the audio sibling to AVC. AAC is the acronym for Advanced Audio Codec. A common extension for this format is M4A.
MPEG4 part 14 (mp4): Is a container format that supports multiple audio tracks and subtitles etc. This container supports a variety of video and audio streams, some of those being... Video: MPEG4 SP/ASP, AVC, MPEG2. Audio: AAC, MP3, MP2 etc.

On that note, what is wrong with VC-1? In my opinion VC-1 seems to offer comparable quality to AVC (h264). Whilst I agree that MPEG2 video is not as efficient as these newer formats. I personally stay away from MPEG2 encoded Blu-ray discs.

I'm sorry to bring this up again but I can never forget the discussion we had about DivX HD on stand alone players and you tryed to say that I don't know what I am talking about. I have been encoding/authoring etc. Audio/Video media for many years now... And your experience is?... Well, you don't need to say as it clearly shows. :-P

Also, what is DTS TrueHD? Did you mean Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD or both?


Originally posted by ghoti:
Film is equivalent to about 4K resolution. So why so you think it would look better compressed down to 720, like it is on a DVD?

Also just because the audio is mono doesn’t mean you won't notice a difference in sound quality.
Compression is the enemy.
Actually NTSC DVD's have 480 lines of resolution. It's a common misunderstanding as it's the horizontal resolution that is 720... SD (DVD): 720 x 480, HD (720p): 1280 x 720, Full HD (1080p): 1920 x 1080.

However, yes I agree. With the marvels of remastering using the technology available today, an old classic film can certainly be given a new lease of life.

eatsushi's point on the audio was referring to the fact that an older film originally recorded in mono doesn't really need a lossless track (Dolby TrueHD/DTS-HD). Sure the audio could be remastered and simulate a surround sound environment, but for this a regular Dolby Digital or DTS audio track would suffice.


PS: LOL!@error5... I didn't think much of Van Helsing either.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 02 May 2008 @ 8:20

"Great minds discuss ideas... Average minds discuss events... Small minds discuss people"

PS3 compatible video creation thread... mkv2vob, tsMuxeR etc.: http://forums.afterdawn.com/thread_view.cfm/621809
The complete HD (Blu-ray/HD-DVD) back-up thread.: http://forums.afterdawn.com/thread_view.cfm/639346

152.5.2008 7:26

Originally posted by nobrainer:
so really old films that were shot in technicolor and in mono sound benefit the consumer from the blu-ray rehash how exactly then?
Even old films find new life when released in 1080p.

Let's take the HD DVD release of Casablanca for example:

http://hddvd.highdefdigest.com/498/casablanca.html

Picture Quality: 5/5 stars

Quote:
This HD DVD release of 'Casablanca' follows a painstaking, grade-A remaster standard def DVD reissue back in 2003. The results were glorious then, and they are glorious now -- this is the way we dream our favorite classics will look when they come to home video. It is also a transfer so superior that even if I could find anything to remotely nitpick about, it would be pretty useless.

'Casablanca' is presented in 1080p/VC-1 video and appropriately pillarboxed to the film's original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.33:1. The black and white image is wonderful. The source material has been meticulously cleaned up, and good luck finding a speck of dirt, dropouts or inconsistencies in contrast or black levels. The film has a nice, deep and rich look, with excellent smoothness across the entire grayscale. Sharpness is perhaps slightly "soft" by today's standards, but terrific for a film from 1942. I continue to marvel at how deep and detailed this film looks. Fine textures throughout are clearly visible -- I could make out indentations on the spine of a book, or see slight creases in the clean whites of Humphrey Bogart's tuxedo. I am also grateful Warner didn't over-tweak this one -- whites never bloom and at no point is the image overly contrasted in an effort to make the film look "newer" or "glossier." Instead, 'Casablanca' maintains a very natural, film-like look throughout. Without a doubt this is the finest black and white transfer I've seen on high-def, period, and up there with the best remasters ever created for the home theater environment.

162.5.2008 8:12
nobrainer
Inactive

Quote:
Originally posted by nobrainer:
so really old films that were shot in technicolor and in mono sound benefit the consumer from the blu-ray rehash how exactly then?
Even old films find new life when released in 1080p.

Let's take the HD DVD release of Casablanca for example:

http://hddvd.highdefdigest.com/498/casablanca.html

Picture Quality: 5/5 stars

Quote:
This HD DVD release of 'Casablanca' follows a painstaking, grade-A remaster standard def DVD reissue back in 2003. The results were glorious then, and they are glorious now -- this is the way we dream our favorite classics will look when they come to home video. It is also a transfer so superior that even if I could find anything to remotely nitpick about, it would be pretty useless.

'Casablanca' is presented in 1080p/VC-1 video and appropriately pillarboxed to the film's original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.33:1. The black and white image is wonderful. The source material has been meticulously cleaned up, and good luck finding a speck of dirt, dropouts or inconsistencies in contrast or black levels. The film has a nice, deep and rich look, with excellent smoothness across the entire grayscale. Sharpness is perhaps slightly "soft" by today's standards, but terrific for a film from 1942. I continue to marvel at how deep and detailed this film looks. Fine textures throughout are clearly visible -- I could make out indentations on the spine of a book, or see slight creases in the clean whites of Humphrey Bogart's tuxedo. I am also grateful Warner didn't over-tweak this one -- whites never bloom and at no point is the image overly contrasted in an effort to make the film look "newer" or "glossier." Instead, 'Casablanca' maintains a very natural, film-like look throughout. Without a doubt this is the finest black and white transfer I've seen on high-def, period, and up there with the best remasters ever created for the home theater environment.

ah Casablanca would that be another film that is in the public domain and is FREE to download?

172.5.2008 8:25

Originally posted by nobrainer:
ah Casablanca would that be another film that is in the public domain and is FREE to download?
I believe it's still distributed by Warner Bros.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0034583/companycredits

182.5.2008 8:34
nobrainer
Inactive

Originally posted by juankerr:
Originally posted by nobrainer:
ah Casablanca would that be another film that is in the public domain and is FREE to download?
I believe it's still distributed by Warner Bros.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0034583/companycredits


As a question what was copywrite law in 1942 and how long did the copywrite last for?

192.5.2008 8:36

Quote:
Originally posted by nobrainer:
all video on blu-ray should be mpge4 with dts true HD audio, otherwise whats the point.
Define what you mean by MPEG4? You do know there is many ways the name "MPEG4" can be used, don't you?

MPEG4 part2 (SP/ASP): Is a video stream format utilising h263 quantization, eg: DivX, Xvid etc.
MPEG4 part 10 (AVC): Is a video stream format utilising h264 quantization. AVC is the acronym for Advanced Video Codec. This is one of the three mandatory video codecs that Blu-ray/HD-DVD players support (I am guessing this is the format you are referring to).
MPEG4 part 3 (AAC): This is the audio sibling to AVC. AAC is the acronym for Advanced Audio Codec. A common extension for this format is M4A.
MPEG4 part 14 (mp4): Is a container format that supports multiple audio tracks and subtitles etc. This container supports a variety of video and audio streams, some of those being... Video: MPEG4 SP/ASP, AVC, MPEG2. Audio: AAC, MP3, MP2 etc.

On that note, what is wrong with VC-1? In my opinion VC-1 seems to offer comparable quality to AVC (h264). Whilst I agree that MPEG2 video is not as efficient as these newer formats. I personally stay away from MPEG2 encoded Blu-ray discs.

I'm sorry to bring this up again but I can never forget the discussion we had about DivX HD on stand alone players and you tryed to say that I don't know what I am talking about. I have been encoding/authoring etc. Audio/Video media for many years now... And your experience is?... Well, you don't need to say as it clearly shows. :-P

Also, what is DTS TrueHD? Did you mean Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD or both?


Originally posted by ghoti:
Film is equivalent to about 4K resolution. So why so you think it would look better compressed down to 720, like it is on a DVD?

Also just because the audio is mono doesn’t mean you won't notice a difference in sound quality.
Compression is the enemy.
Actually NTSC DVD's have 480 lines of resolution. It's a common misunderstanding as it's the horizontal resolution that is 720... SD (DVD): 720 x 480, HD (720p): 1280 x 720, Full HD (1080p): 1920 x 1080.

However, yes I agree. With the marvels of remastering using the technology available today, an old classic film can certainly be given a new lease of life.

eatsushi's point on the audio was referring to the fact that an older film originally recorded in mono doesn't really need a lossless track (Dolby TrueHD/DTS-HD). Sure the audio could be remastered and simulate a surround sound environment, but for this a regular Dolby Digital or DTS audio track would suffice.


PS: LOL!@error5... I didn't think much of Van Helsing either.



Yeah your right about it being 480. I should proof read my own post.
but what does lossless audio have to do with surround sound?
To me its compression vs. no compression.

202.5.2008 8:41
nobrainer
Inactive

@ ghoti

any form of compression is bad as it is reducing quality somehow, UK DAB is a great example of this as the new improved digital service is worse quality than current FM radio.

instead of a virtual sound like prologic 2.1 ect, each channel has its own sound stream.

lossless = no compression.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 02 May 2008 @ 8:45

212.5.2008 8:46
varnull
Inactive

Doesn't matter... They have extended it to 75 years and want 95 to cover the early comedies and silents which are still circulating. Anything made from 1933 on is copyright, though that increases by 1 year as we travel through time.

Hey losers.. I'm as entitled to my opinion of a film as anybody else. Sucky films? Transformers is the biggest pile of crap I have even seen, closely followed by that useless Spiderman3 whatever mess it was.

The great films are coming from European makers, but you yanks wouldn't know about those would you? World Series...... hahahahaha

222.5.2008 8:57

Van Helsing reviews from rottentomatoes:

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/van_helsing/?critic=creamcrop

Quote:
This moronic abomination is not a movie. It's just a noisy, nasty and repulsive video game-slash- theme-park haunted-house ride designed to appeal to the offspring of warlocks and trolls.
Rex Reed
New York Observer

This is what happens when you spend pots of money on special effects but don't give a fig about storytelling.
Stephanie Zacharek
Salon.com

Van Helsing is one excruciatingly loud set piece of CGI hooey after another, and when a character or a plot twist does manage to make you laugh, you're not sure whether it's camp or ineptitude. Ty Burr
Boston Globe

Painful to read but these pretty much sum up the sentiments of most critics.

Originally posted by varnull:
Hey losers.. I'm as entitled to my opinion of a film as anybody else.
Far be it from you to criticize others' tastes then.


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232.5.2008 9:11

Originally posted by error5:
Van Helsing reviews from rottentomatoes:

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/van_helsing/?critic=creamcrop

Quote:
This moronic abomination is not a movie. It's just a noisy, nasty and repulsive video game-slash- theme-park haunted-house ride designed to appeal to the offspring of warlocks and trolls.
Rex Reed
New York Observer

This is what happens when you spend pots of money on special effects but don't give a fig about storytelling.
Stephanie Zacharek
Salon.com

Van Helsing is one excruciatingly loud set piece of CGI hooey after another, and when a character or a plot twist does manage to make you laugh, you're not sure whether it's camp or ineptitude. Ty Burr
Boston Globe

Painful to read but these pretty much sum up the sentiments of most critics.

Originally posted by varnull:
Hey losers.. I'm as entitled to my opinion of a film as anybody else.
Far be it from you to criticize others' tastes then.
Exactly. I thought van Helsing and Transformers were cut from the very same mold - 99% CGI effects and 1% story and plot.

Although Transformers was more tolerable...

...mainly due to Megan Fox. (Right, goodswipe?)

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/transformers_the_movie/

Transformers:

T Meter critics score = 57%
Top critics score = 68%
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 02 May 2008 @ 9:22

242.5.2008 10:49

The other good thing about DTS-HD MA for those without HDMI or advanced codec receivers - you can still take advantage of the Core DTS soundtrack which is at an impressive 1.5Mbps thru optical or digital coax.

Originally posted by juankerr:
Even old films find new life when released in 1080p.
Let's take the HD DVD release of Casablanca for example:
Exactly right. Casablanca looked pristine and very impressive on my 1080p front projector setup. The HD DVD release really brought it back to life.

252.5.2008 10:52
nobrainer
Inactive

Originally posted by eatsushi:
The other good thing about DTS-HD MA for those without HDMI or advanced codec receivers - you can still take advantage of the Core DTS soundtrack which is at an impressive 1.5Mbps thru optical or digital coax.
that's tru, but as soon as the ict (Image Constraint Token) is switched on around 2010 we will lose that ability.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 02 May 2008 @ 10:53

262.5.2008 11:08

Originally posted by nobrainer:
that's tru, but as soon as the ict (Image Constraint Token) is switched on around 2010 we will lose that ability.
???

The ICT has nothing to do with the DTS-HD MA or DTS core soundtrack. It's a video protocol flag.

ICT = IMAGE Constraint Token

You can hook up your player by HDMI to your HDTV but if you have an older audio setup you'll still have the advantage of a 1.5Mbps DTS core audio track thru digital coax or optical.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 02 May 2008 @ 11:14

272.5.2008 11:15
nobrainer
Inactive

Originally posted by eatsushi:
Originally posted by nobrainer:
that's tru, but as soon as the ict (Image Constraint Token) is switched on around 2010 we will lose that ability.
???

The ICT has nothing to do with the DTS-HD MA or DTS core soundtrack. It's a video protocol flag.

ICT = IMAGE Constraint Token
as far as the reports on the eff state it will be both the video and sound output via none hdcp hdmi connections lowering the picture to less than current dvd quality and the sound to 5.1 only no dts.

282.5.2008 11:20

Originally posted by nobrainer:
as far as the reports on the eff state it will be both the video and sound output via none hdcp hdmi connections lowering the picture to less than current dvd quality and the sound to 5.1 only no dts.
???

You're confused by the different flavors of DTS.

DTS HD MA - lossless - needs HDMI or analog
DTS HD High Resolution - lossy - needs HDMI or analog
DTS Core - lossy - needs optical or digital coax

You don't have to use HDMI for the 1.5Mbps core DTS audio track. You can get this thru the legacy digital coax or optical. Therefore, you don't need one of the newer advanced receivers for this. It doesn't rely on an HDCP connection.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 02 May 2008 @ 11:23

298.5.2008 8:49

For those of you with a more eclectic, arthouse taste for movies, and for those who eschew the CGI, and special effects laden formulaic fare coming from Hollywood these days:

Criterion Collection coming to Blu-ray in October

Quote:
The Criterion Collection's long-awaited HD debut -- delayed by that annoying format war -- finally has a date, as well as a list of the first movies getting a definitive release in 1080p. If that wasn't enough, try this bit on for size: They won't charge viewers extra for the privilege. That's right, according to the e-mail that went out to subscribers today, all Blu-ray releases will feature HD picture and sound (no word on what codecs, although we expect nothing but the best considering the company has been mastering and restoring all releases in HD for years now), all the supplemental content and a matching (unspecified) price to their standard DVD editions. The complete email and list of a dozen movies follows after the break, along with a note that The Last Emperor will also be released in its original theatrical version on both formats for $39.95, while Walkabout will be an all-new edition.
MSRP will be the same for the regular DVD and the BluRay release.

The e-mail sent to subscribers:

Quote:
Dear Criterion Collection Newsletter subscriber,

We've got some exciting news for this fall, and we wanted you to hear it first.

Our first Blu-ray discs are coming! We've picked a little over a dozen titles from the collection for Blu-ray treatment, and we'll begin rolling them out in October. These new editions will feature glorious high-definition picture and sound, all the supplemental content of the DVD releases, and they will be priced to match our standard-def editions.

Here's what's in the pipeline:

The Third Man
Bottle Rocket
Chungking Express
The Man Who Fell to Earth
The Last Emperor
El Norte
The 400 Blows
Gimme Shelter
The Complete Monterey Pop
Contempt
Walkabout
For All Mankind
The Wages of Fear

Alongside our DVD and Blu-ray box sets of The Last Emperor, we'll also be putting out the theatrical version as a stand-alone release in both formats, priced at $39.95. Our Blu-ray release of Walkabout will be an all-new edition, featuring new supplements as well as a new transfer; we will also release an updated anamorphic DVD of Nicolas Roeg's outback masterpiece at the same time.

As a special thank you to our newsletter subscribers, we'd like to offer you all $10 off any order of $60 or more placed on on criterion.com through Monday, May 26.


This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 08 May 2008 @ 8:51

Panasonic PT-AE3000 1080p Projector//Carada 110" Criterion High Contrast Grey 16:9 Screen//Oppo BDP-83SE//Toshiba HD-XA2
Classe SSP800 Processor//Classe CA-5200 5 Channel Amplifier//Classe CA-2200 2 Channel Amplifier
Bowers & Wilkins 802D L-R/HTM 1D Center/SCMS Surrounds/JL Audio Fathom f113 x 2

308.5.2008 9:11
dblbogey7
Inactive

Originally posted by error5:
For those of you with a more eclectic, arthouse taste for movies, and for those who eschew the CGI, and special effects laden formulaic fare coming from Hollywood these days:

Criterion Collection coming to Blu-ray in October
Excellent news. Several on those list will be definite must-buys for me. Hopefully their next announcement will include films by Akira Kurosawa (especially Kagemusha and Ran).

318.5.2008 10:37

Originally posted by dblbogey7:
Originally posted by error5:
For those of you with a more eclectic, arthouse taste for movies, and for those who eschew the CGI, and special effects laden formulaic fare coming from Hollywood these days:

Criterion Collection coming to Blu-ray in October
Excellent news. Several on those list will be definite must-buys for me. Hopefully their next announcement will include films by Akira Kurosawa (especially Kagemusha and Ran).
My dad will be happy when I tell him about this. He has a massive collection of Criterion titles on laserdisc which he still enjoys to this day. Last year he bought his first BD player so this news will put a smile on his face.

dblbogey7: I have the Criterion DVD of Ran but it will definitely be worth a double dip if they release this masterpiece in 1080p:




http://www.criterion.com/asp/release.asp?id=316
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 08 May 2008 @ 10:45

329.5.2008 11:41

Originally posted by error5:
For those of you with a more eclectic, arthouse taste for movies, and for those who eschew the CGI, and special effects laden formulaic fare coming from Hollywood these days:
Thankfully, not all CGI/special effects movies are bad:

Iron Man is the Best-Reviewed Movie of 2008!

Quote:
The Marvel adventure could be the best-reviewed superhero movie of all time.
by Jen Yamato
May 01, 2008

Sure to be the first bona fide blockbuster of 2008, Iron Man already has its first crown to claim. The Marvel icon's inaugural foray onto the big screen is not only Certified Fresh and Rotten Tomatoes' best-reviewed film of the year so far -- it's also potentially one of the highest-rated superhero movies of all time.
92% on rottentomatoes.com:

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/iron_man/

This title is going to be HUGE when Paramount releases it on BluRay.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 09 May 2008 @ 11:42

339.5.2008 11:51
goodswipe
Inactive

I have the Criterion DVD of Fear and Loathing - excellent movie!

349.5.2008 12:20

Originally posted by goodswipe:
I have the Criterion DVD of Fear and Loathing - excellent movie!
I didn't know you were a Terry Gilliam fan. If you liked Fear and Loathing then the Criterion release of Brazil (IMO his best film) will blow you away. The 3-disc boxed set was one of Criterion's best releases ever.

http://www.criterion.com/asp/boxed_set.asp?id=10051

359.5.2008 12:27
goodswipe
Inactive

Originally posted by eatsushi:
Originally posted by goodswipe:
I have the Criterion DVD of Fear and Loathing - excellent movie!
I didn't know you were a Terry Gilliam fan. If you liked Fear and Loathing then the Criterion release of Brazil (IMO his best film) will blow you away. The 3-disc boxed set was one of Criterion's best releases ever.

http://www.criterion.com/asp/boxed_set.asp?id=10051


Yea man, that guy is a genius! Fear and Loathing has always been one of my all time favorites. Fist time I watched it was like 10 years ago. I still notice new things every time I watch it.


Brazil huh? Ahh, a black comedy, my favorite. I'm definitely going to check that out.

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