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DreamStream clarifies: no MPAA endorsement

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 08 Jul 2008 14:26 User comments (9)

DreamStream clarifies: no MPAA endorsement In the past few days reports have come out that the MPAA was endorsing the use of a new streaming video system which utilizes 2048 bit encryption. The information was based on a press release from DreamStream, the company that developed the new technology. Today DreamStream issued another press release clarifying their earlier statement.
It turns out there was no actual endorsement by the MPAA. In fact they've only assessed the technology in order to educate their members.

"DreamStream used unfortunate wording to describe our relationship with the MPAA," said Scott Diffenderfer, chief executive officer for DreamStream. "We did not wish to make any implications of endorsement of our technology by the MPAA and apologize for any confusion in this regard."

The original release had been intended merely to state that the MPAA's review had concluded that the DreamStream system is viable without taking a position on whether it's the best choice for studios.

"While we recognize that the MPAA does not endorse specific technologies, we are pleased that they have chosen to assess how our technology can benefit the film industry," said Ulf Diebel, DreamStream's chief development officer. "The MPAA's commitment to securing the studios' interests is unsurpassed. Piracy is waging war against the entertainment industry, and the MPAA is relentless in defending the rights of content owners."

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9 user comments

18.7.2008 15:22
jony218
Inactive

Quote:
we are pleased that they have chosen to assess how our technology can benefit the film industry
How about the end user? Will it benefit us by providing a clearer stutter-free picture?

You need an industrial grade computer to decode a 2048 bit code. Even the government doesn't use that type of protection.

28.7.2008 16:33
nobrainer
Inactive

Quote:
How about the end user? Will it benefit us by providing a clearer stutter-free picture?

You need an industrial grade computer to decode a 2048 bit code. Even the government doesn't use that type of protection.
it will no doubt push the costs up. but lets hope there are no adverse effects to playback if this encryption is ever used.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 08 Jul 2008 @ 16:35

38.7.2008 17:26

Quote:
Quote:
we are pleased that they have chosen to assess how our technology can benefit the film industry
How about the end user? Will it benefit us by providing a clearer stutter-free picture?

You need an industrial grade computer to decode a 2048 bit code. Even the government doesn't use that type of protection.

It's the MPAA. Since when do they care what you want?

48.7.2008 17:37

Originally posted by vurbal:
Quote:
Quote:
we are pleased that they have chosen to assess how our technology can benefit the film industry
How about the end user? Will it benefit us by providing a clearer stutter-free picture?

You need an industrial grade computer to decode a 2048 bit code. Even the government doesn't use that type of protection.

It's the MPAA. Since when do they care what you want?
They haven't, won't, and don't. Period.


58.7.2008 17:38
nobrainer
Inactive

Originally posted by vurbal :
It's the MPAA. Since when do they care what you want?
They are more than happy to hand out the lube, and many consumers seem to love it!


This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 08 Jul 2008 @ 17:39

69.7.2008 6:55

I hope The Pirate Bay and other sites will intorduce 2048-bit encryption. That'd show them anti-consumer organizations.

79.7.2008 9:00

I have been using the help pages for a long time now as the guides are invaluable to circumvent the varying forms of DRM and i often read the news pages. the ongoing battle against hollywood and their digital locks is very concerning lately but this attempt is completely futile as other posters have already mentioned, so why waste more money on pointless locks. but why make the false statement that DreamStream did.


Originally posted by nobrainer:
The BPI Are: SONY, UNIVERSAL, WARNER GROUP, EMI.
The RIAA Soundexchange Are: SONY, UNIVERSAL, WARNER GROUP, EMI.
The IFPI Are: The same anti consumer lot as listed above!
The MPAA Are: SONY, UNIVERSAL, WARNER GROUP, DISNEY, PARAMOUNT, FOX.
the best way to educate everyone is to name the companies and stop them, just as nike has been subjected to pressure, apple, adidas mc donalds so and and so forth. name and shame is the best weapon to fight large companies that think they can do as they wish.

812.7.2008 18:50

Quote:
You need an industrial grade computer to decode a 2048 bit code. Even the government doesn't use that type of protection.
Are you sure about that?

913.7.2008 0:29

Quote:

Are you sure about that?
Trying a brute-force attack maybe.

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