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DECE - Media industry's best and last hope for DRM?

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 14 Sep 2008 17:59 User comments (13)

DECE - Media industry's best and last hope for DRM? A consortium of media industry companies have announced their plans to bring the digital world together using what they call the Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem, or DECE.
The consortium, which consists of media giants Alcatel-Lucent, Best Buy Co Inc, Cisco Systems Inc, Comcast, News Corp's Fox Entertainment Group, Hewlett-Packard Co, Intel, Lions Gate Entertainment Corp, Microsoft Corp, General Electric Co's NBC Universal, Viacom Inc's Paramount Pictures, Philips, Sony Corp, Toshiba, VeriSign, and Time Warner Inc's Warner Bros Entertainment are working on a "uniform digital media experience" but admits it will not announce any more details until the CES event in January.

DECE President Mitch Singer added however that the group wants "interoperability of devices and websites" and fair usage rights that will allow consumers to copy content for household playback devices as well as burn their purchased content to physical media for playback or storage.

Each consumer would also be given a "rights locker", a virtual library where all video purchases would be stored and available for download again if ever lost.

DECE will also have a logo that can be places on products and websites that will inform consumers on whether that site or product is compatible with DECE standards.

"We will be developing a ... specification that services and device makers can license. They can use the logo to associate their device, knowing that when the consumer goes to buy the content, they know it will play,"
Singer added.

Singer noted that the new framework would destroy the current "closed" iTunes model headed by Apple.

"This is very different from the Apple ecosystem," he said. "We encourage Apple to join the consortium. We don't ever anticipate Apple going away or this consortium replacing it."

Mark Coblitz, senior vice president of strategic planning for Comcast says a main aim is to give consumers back the comfort and simplicity they feel with a physical DVD, but with video downloads.

"They knew that when they brought (a DVD) home, they could play it on the device of their choice,"
Coblitz said. "We see this vision of 'buy once, play anywhere.'"

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13 user comments

114.9.2008 19:47

Quote:
Each consumer would also be given a "rights locker", a virtual library where all video purchases would be stored and available for download again if ever lost
Riiight. Until they, like EA, decide to shut down the servers. Or decide you aren't worthy of having your cake and eating it too. No thanks, I will stick with my OWN hard drives, but thank you for playing.

And I love how they keep referring to us in an ecological context.. "Consumers" instead of "Customers". In other words, we're on par with animals. Hence the term, Sheeple.

Fail.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 14 Sep 2008 @ 19:50

214.9.2008 19:55
varnull
Inactive

Quote:
Riiight. Until they, like EA, decide to shut down the servers. Or decide you aren't worthy of having your cake and eating it too.
Or decide you don't run an "approved" system packed full of their drm and spyware.

314.9.2008 20:42

Yeah more fail. just want i need

414.9.2008 21:28

*snicker*
A consumer CONSUMES what he gets..a CUSTOMER OWNS what he gets. See the writing on the wall? Use THEIR backup servers!? Spindles and discs don't crash. Nor do they have ''logos'' and all the CRAP that will be coded into the hardware with said ''logo''!

514.9.2008 23:45

just another DRM. I'll extend my middle finger, tall and proud for these *bleep* once again and boycott their products.


This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 29 Oct 2008 @ 16:39

615.9.2008 4:36

None of the things they want to achieve are possible without extensive drm schemes all over not just our computers but seemingly everything electronic. Possibly embedded into future operating systems... Or coded into the hardware... Ah well. More interesting challenges for hackers. And it will be broken. That's just how it is.

717.9.2008 16:34

Isn't this similar to the "Stream" model? Stream seems to be doing pretty good and people on this forum like it.

This actually seems like a good idea. Think about it:

Buy it once then play it on anything these companies make. If it is popular idea, more companies will be on board and more products will be made.

And before you anti-drm people start screaming, you can download it on a disc and remove any drm that is on it.

But then again, this is my speculation based on the article. Let us all see how it is implemented before we dismiss it so quickly.

This might be a step in the right direction for the media companies to move from their "dead business model".

818.9.2008 4:32

Quote:
"We see this vision of 'buy once, play anywhere.'"

Sorry, but too good to be true.

920.9.2008 10:53

Quote:
working on a "uniform digital media experience"
We are trying to come up with a standard and uniform way to screw you all so nobody can say this or that DRM is better or worse than the other.

1020.9.2008 18:30

I might be a move to have fair use without copying anything copyrighted. Most people would want the back up.

1123.9.2008 0:27
vudoo
Inactive

Well think about it you buy a Movie and can back it up and if your computer goes down, there is a Fire, want to move to a new device you can and without the hassle of several CD's or DvD's. Cellular Internet is getting cheaper and cheaper so imagine a car Mp3 player that can Download all of your legally purchased music and you dan't have to worry about a thing. However if they go to the only 2 devices per song/Movie that would really suck. I can also see the AEM scheme comming out of this soon.

1228.10.2008 12:54

Hey give them a LITTLE bit of credit...

They're finally starting to follow the recommendations made by the EFF (Electronic Frontier Foundation) as well as other internet analysts... which is, basically, make the legal service better than the illegal one.

If I had a full library of DRM-free reliable media I could download legally for, say, $14.99/mo (what I pay for most MMOs) I would jump on it and uninstall every last BitTorrent, IRC, and Newsgroup peice of software I have. (which would also free up ALOT of space ^_^)

But until then...

1329.10.2008 8:40

Good one Hardwyre. Many of us are too militant to recognise the good in some of these ideas. Although we have good reason to be militant, we do not need to be as ignorant and one-sided as 'the enemy'.

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