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Review: Exact Audio Copy 0.99 - Perfect CD copies or just hype?

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 11 Feb 2009 19:11 User comments (19)

Review: Exact Audio Copy 0.99 - Perfect CD copies or just hype? Over the last few years Exact Audio Copy (EAC) has gotten a reputation as one of the best (if not the very best) audio CD ripping tool around. Despite being officially designated as "prebeta" software it's actually one of the most reliable and full-featured audio tools available. We've recently added three guides that take you from installation to ripping CDs, and even explain how to work with the unusual CD Image backups it produces. But before you read these guides you may want to find out more about the program to see if it's right for you.
Secure Ripping
Although most people tend to think of CDs as sounding the same every time they're played, in reality almost every time a disc is read there are errors. With modern media like DVD, or even CD-ROMs, this can be dealt with using very sophisticated error correction to re-create the original data. Audio CDs, on the other hand, primarily use a strategy of hiding errors instead of correcting them. While this increases the amount of damage it takes to audibly reduce quality, it also increases the complexity of performing perfect backups.

Afterdawn's new EAC guides
Exact Audio Copy Installation and Configuration
Rip CDs With Exact Audio Copy
Split CD Images To Individual Tracks
EAC uses something called Secure Ripping to address the problem. Most CD rippers simply read each block of data once and assume the results are correct. EAC reads each one multiple times and compares the results to make sure they're the same. If they aren't the same it reads them again. For damaged CDs this can result in rips that require hours to complete, but for discs in good, but not great condition it can be the difference between a copy that's perfect and one that's just pretty close.

CD Images
If you look at an audio CD on your computer it appears to contain several individual audio files. This is what allows your computer to play or rip a particular track. But that's not actually how the data is stored on the disc. In reality audio CDs are made up of a single audio track. A Table of Contents (TOC) is used to tell the CD player (or your computer) where each track starts and ends.

Exact Audio Copy uses a special CD image format to duplicate this structure. The result is a single audio file and a separate text file called a Cue Sheet. Like a CD's Table of Contents, EAC's cue sheets are basically maps that specify where each track starts and ends and how much time is in the gaps between them.

Making Archival Backups
Perhaps the best reason to copy your CDs using EAC is for making archival backup copies. As already noted, audio CDs don't have real error correction. But CD images created with Exact Audio Copy do because they're stored in a computer, rather than CD player format. And so do CD-ROMs, better known as data CDs. If you copy an audio CD to another audio CD you end up with two discs with the same lack of error correction. If you make a CD image and put that on a data CD you'll have a backup with the error correction inherent in computer file systems.

Of course there are tradeoffs. You won't be able to play this backup in a regular CD player. Instead you'll need to use the backup to make a new audio CD. And if the disc becomes too damaged the entire CD image can become unreadable. An audio CD on the other hand may not sound quite like the original but it generally won't stop playing all at once.

Multi-file Images
What if you're just ripping files to play them instead of as a backup? EAC also has a solution for this. Not only can it rip to individual files, it can also make a sort of pseudo CD image out of them. This simply involves writing a cue sheet that refers to multiple audio files rather than one big file. It even includes a feature for splitting an image (which has already been ripped) into separate audio files.

Compression
Whether you're archiving your CDs or just ripping tracks for your iPod it's almost always useful to use a format other than the default WAV file. Fortunately EAC is capable of compressing to just about ever conceivable format. As long as there's a command line tool to use, EAC can handle the conversion.

Version 0.99
Last January, when version 0.99 prebeta 1 was announced, it had been over two years since the previous release. Given EAC's already excellent reputation the question was what new features this new version would have. As it turns out the big additions are geared toward making it easier for the average user than ever before.

The Configuration Wizard
Even if you're planning to go back and look at every setting you should start here. You can also run it again at any time to change your settings. The Configuraion Wizard is probably the bigget improvment In EAC 0.99. Previous versions also had the wizard, but it didn't cover all the settings a beginner might need.

If you want truly accurate rips it's important for EAC to know about some features your CD-ROM or burner might support. It has a database of drives, and in most cases it will be able to configure itself accordingly. If you have more than one CD drive it will also tell you which one will produce the best (most accurate) results.

Drive Features
Compression Options
Even though EAC has been able to compress ripped tracks for several versions, actually setting the necessary options was pretty cryptic. For most people it was probably easier to wait and do that with a different program later. The last version or two have included MP3 encoder settings for LAME. The latest version adds configuration for WMA (lossy or lossless) and FLAC lossless encoding. Notably missing is AAC encoder configuration. You can find instructions for that in our EAC Installation and Configuration guide.

freedb Setup
EAC uses freedb to provide CD information,.including album and artist name and album release date. Like past versions you'll be prompted to enter an email address, which is required for freedb access.

Filename Configuration
Another addition to the wizard is an array of presets for naming audio files. Just like in the past you can customize this even further using the advanced dialogs later on.

AccurateRip
Although technically added in the last release of EAC -.95, more than 2 years before the current version, AccurateRip will no doubt be new for many long time EAC users. It's basically an online database that allows you to share information about your CD rips with other people. When you rip a CD that's in the AccurateRip database your final results will be compared against what others have submitted. EAC will give you a report telling you how your rip compares to others, which then helps you determine how accurate your rip really is.

Tests
To test EAC I ripped 3 different CDs using the default settings. I used the Test and Create Image option because it reads the CD first and creates a checksum to compare against another checksum generated from the actual rip. I saved log files from each one to evaluate the results. Read the notes for each test to understand what included numbers mean.

Test 1 - A High Quality CD
For the first CD I chose one I could use as a control. I knew it was in good condition and shouldn't have any read errors. The purpose of this test is to verify identical checksums from the Test and Rip phase, as well as seeing the AccurateRip report.
Checksum MatchYes
Errors ReportedNone
Range Quality100%
AccurateRip ResultsTrack 1 accurately ripped (confidence 5)
Track 2 accurately ripped (confidence 5)
Track 3 accurately ripped (confidence 5)

Since this CD is in very good condition I knew what values EAC should give me, and it didn't disappoint. The Checksum for both the Test and Rip operations matches. That means it read the same data both times. The Range Quality of 100% tells me EAC didn't have to back up and re-read any sectors due to suspicious data from the first pass. The AccurateRip results tell me five other people have reported the same results ripping this CD. In other words I almost certainly have an exact copy.

Test 2 - Surface Damage
The second CD I ripped had a lot of surface scratches, but once again no real damage. This was intended to find out how EAC handles this common situation. Just to be sure I also ripped the same CD two more times to verify consistent rips. The results were identical, which is what you'd hope to see from a program claiming to make an "exact copy."
Checksum MatchYes
Errors ReportedNone
Range Quality99.9%
AccurateRip ResultsTrack 1 accurately ripped (confidence 3)
Track 2 accurately ripped (confidence 2)
Track 3 accurately ripped (confidence 2)
Track 4 accurately ripped (confidence 2)
Track 5 accurately ripped (confidence 2)
Track 6 accurately ripped (confidence 2)
Track 7 accurately ripped (confidence 2)
Track 8 accurately ripped (confidence 2)
Track 9 accurately ripped (confidence 2)
Track 10 accurately ripped (confidence 2)
Track 11 accurately ripped (confidence 2)

The log file for this rip indicated a Range Quality of 99.9%. This tells me that EAC did, in fact, have to back up and re-read a small portion of the CD to verify correct data. If EAC reports no errors but Range Quality is lower than 100% you can use the AccurateRip results to figure out if the rip is accurate. In this case every song matched the results of at least two other people so I feel confident it's still accurate.

Test 3 - Serious Damage
Finally I dug out a CD I knew had bigger problems. In this case I was just trying to find out how long it would take to rip I so skipped the Test operation. Although most of the ripping was done within 20 minutes, the last 2% took about another 8 hours. If you have a lot of CDs like this you may want to change EAC's settings to favor speed rather than accuracy when you rip them. Fortunately this can be done easily by simply running the wizard a second time. You can also keep multiple settings saved as profiles so you can switch between them without using the wizard.
Checksum MatchNA
Errors ReportedSuspicious position 0:55:38 - 0:55:39
Suspicious position 0:55:41 - 0:56:40
Suspicious position 0:56:43 - 0:56:47
Range Quality96.9%
AccurateRip ResultsTrack 1 accurately ripped (confidence 32)
Track 2 cannot be verified as accurate (confidence 30)
Track 3 accurately ripped (confidence 31)
Track 4 accurately ripped (confidence 31)
Track 5 accurately ripped (confidence 31)
Track 6 accurately ripped (confidence 31)
Track 7 accurately ripped (confidence 29)
Track 8 accurately ripped (confidence 30)
Track 9 accurately ripped (confidence 29)
Track 10 accurately ripped (confidence 29)
Track 11 accurately ripped (confidence 29)
Track 12 accurately ripped (confidence 29)
Track 13 accurately ripped (confidence 29)
Track 14 cannot be verified as accurate (confidence 28)

This test shows two things. First, if you look at the AccurateRip report you'll see that Track 2 appears to show inaccuracy compared to the database, which EAC doesn't notice. Just because it reads the same every time doesn't guarantee there aren't errors. You should also note that EAC only reports a few seconds of likely errors, and yet as I mentioned it took over 8 hours to rip this CD.

Conclusion
Exact Audio Copy has been a great tool for a long time and my testing doesn't show anything that would dispute that greatness. In the past, though, you had to be a power user, or at least knew where to ask one for advice, to take advantage of its true power. What this latest version brings to the table is access to every key feature for Joe Six Pack. Even if you don't want to look at a single advanced option it's possible to do nearly everything the average user might care about.

And don't be fooled by the prebeta status or low version number. This is reliable, well tested software that could compete with any commercial tool on the market.

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19 user comments

111.2.2009 21:03

This is a great piece of software indeed and it is compatible with almost any type of audio compression out.

I personally use it to FLAC encode my CDs and RockBox (Aftermarket iPod firmware) to play them.

211.2.2009 23:23

Sounds like sweet software. I've used CDex for years because it would tell me if there were jitters (skips) in the CD's I was ripping. But they stopped updating it years ago. I've never been able to find one to replace it, WMP rips really fast, but you never know unless you listen to it what it sound like. So you'll find out later, after your not at your computer anymore if it skips. I'm definitely going to check this out

313.2.2009 2:39

lmao windac http://www.windac.de/ has provided error free CD ripping for over 10 years now. With a syncro buffer that can re-read bad sectors again and again until it gets it right.

I once had a disk so scratched it wouldnt play in anything, it was the only copy i had, so a day and half later after windac had re-read most sectors possibly 80 times or so i got out a perfect audio.

So as the technology has been with us for over 10 years im firmly saying JUST HYPE !!

413.2.2009 8:03

Originally posted by plazma247:
lmao windac http://www.windac.de/ has provided error free CD ripping for over 10 years now. With a syncro buffer that can re-read bad sectors again and again until it gets it right.

I once had a disk so scratched it wouldnt play in anything, it was the only copy i had, so a day and half later after windac had re-read most sectors possibly 80 times or so i got out a perfect audio.

So as the technology has been with us for over 10 years im firmly saying JUST HYPE !!

I'll have to take a look at Windac, but based on the description it would seem to lack several features EAC includes. For starters the website says it can't write CDs. It also doesn't appear to have any image creation abilities. Plus, while there are plugins listed for MP3, TDS, and OGG formats, but nothing for FLAC, APE, or AAC. Also no AccurateRip support. If you look at my tests you'll see that I've shown simply reading the same data all the time doesn't mean accurate results.

Windac looks like an interesting, and possibly quite good program, but it's lacking several features EAC has and doesn't appear to have been in development for a few years now. The last version is from 2005.

As far as EAC being just hype, it does what it says it does. What other metric would you recommend we use?

It rips as accurately as possible, and also verifies using multiple methods so you have the best possible idea how good your backup is compared to the original. It can be used for CD images which can be mounted using Daemon Tools, and it works with any command line encoder. None of these features are hype. They actually work. The fact that another tool includes some of these features doesn't affect how good EAC is any more than EAC's features affect the quality of other tools.

517.2.2009 9:35

I've know about this program for a while. Good to know that it is still getting the recognition it deserves.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 17 Feb 2009 @ 17:31

617.2.2009 9:37

Hello! The links you provide to the three guides above lead nowhere!

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 17 Feb 2009 @ 9:46

Its a lot easier being righteous than right.


DSE VZ300-
Zilog Z80 CPU, 32KB RAM (16K+16K cartridge), video processor 6847, 2KB video RAM, 16 colours (text mode), 5.25" FDD

717.2.2009 10:01

Originally posted by Jemborg:
Hello! The links you provide to the three guides above lead nowhere!

Doh! Fixed now.

Thanks for the heads up!

817.2.2009 10:09

Quote:
Originally posted by Jemborg:
Hello! The links you provide to the three guides above lead nowhere!

Doh! Fixed now.

Thanks for the heads up!
No worries verbul, my pleasure. :)

PS: How's about upping me from "Junior" to ordinary "Member", I've been posting on this site for ages now haha.

918.2.2009 1:02

Hi.

Anyone who has used EAC in the past knows that this classic piece of software is about as far removed from being "hype" as you can get.

I've used it for as long as I can remember and I doubt very much the program will ever let you down except with discs so physically damaged that no software on Earth could ever rescue them.

I get no clicks or pops - just silky-smooth rips with my (LG) dvd burner, and sometimes the rip-speed will approach 40x speed towards the end of the disc.

Case in point: About two weeks ago I stumbled across a discarded, *damaged* (commercial/retail) music cd in a snowbank on my way into work. The disc was so beat-up that I couldn't make out much from the label - it had concentric cracks along the outer edge, had some splits in around the center hub, it was gouged to hell, and even parts of the printed label side had "flaked" off. It was probably the physically-worst-looking cd I had ever seen.

To make matters worse, it was a *gangsta-rap* album, which I think is a form of "music" (and I use the term loosely) invented by Taliban terrorists just to piss people off and makes their eyes bleed.

Anyway..... , I just couldn't resist - with EAC in mind, I tucked the slush-covered disc into my pocket after wiping it off with my mitts.

EAC made it through the *entire cd* with nary a hiccup. Yes, it took about ten minutes to rip (when about *two* is the norm for me), and EAC had to do some fancy error-correcting, BUT, the resultant, ripped wave files were nothing short of _superb_. (If you can stomach listening to gangstarap, I mean). :-)

So yes - I would say that EAC is CLASS ACT.

Thanks for the hands-on report, vurbal - after reading it, I was even spurred on to upgrade my old (like *really* o-l-d) version of LAME - it was an ancient version dating back to 2002 !. (Oh! The shame of it all!), and yes, my newer version 3.98.2 is much tastier. (I automate LAME-handling with batch [ .bat ] files).

It takes a labour-of-love to sit through what you did (having the last 2% of the disc take 8 hours to slog through!!!!) I hope you didn't burn your disc-drive out!!

Thank you again.

-- Klingy --

1018.2.2009 1:15

To A klingon,

My right and most honored Klingon brother (did I mention handsome too?), it has been too long. We toast with your favorite blood wine, Charles Shaw (2 buck chuck)

kaplah !

Your Ferengi brother, iluvendo


"The flimsier the product,the higher the price"
Ferengi 82nd rule of aqusition


1118.2.2009 4:24

Quote:
To A klingon,

My right and most honored Klingon brother (did I mention handsome too?),.....
Thy not-unsubstancial powers of vision have neither faded nor failed thee, my most-respected warrior of these here Galactical Forums.

My humble acknowledgements to the Large-Eared Ferenginon House Of Iluvendo, and his most-honoured, Generously-Lobed Family. May your children's children never want for a good supply of powdered beetle-snuff.

Quote:
....it has been too long. We toast with your favorite blood wine, Charles Shaw (2 buck chuck) kaplah !
Indeed, how can we fail with such Warriors in our fold? SUCCESS is our guaranteed destiny! - Together we shall feast on the flesh of 1000 slaughtered wildebeasts in your honour!

(Boys-oh-boys, I can lay the cheesy schmaltz on pretty thick, eh?) :-)

Quote:
Your Ferengi brother, iluvendo
(Heh-heh....)

Wow! It's been a while, huh iluvendo? I *think* you're the dentist (??) gentleman? Good to 'see' ya !!

P.S. :

Never get caught in a bulkhead where a bunch of hung-over Klingons are blowing wind after washing down scads of "gahhhh" (live worms) with blood wine. Wheeeeeeewwwwww !!

1218.2.2009 6:42

Originally posted by A_Klingon:
Thanks for the hands-on report, vurbal - after reading it, I was even spurred on to upgrade my old (like *really* o-l-d) version of LAME - it was an ancient version dating back to 2002 !. (Oh! The shame of it all!), and yes, my newer version 3.98.2 is much tastier. (I automate LAME-handling with batch [ .bat ] files).

It takes a labour-of-love to sit through what you did (having the last 2% of the disc take 8 hours to slog through!!!!) I hope you didn't burn your disc-drive out!!

Thank you again.

-- Klingy --

You're quite welcome. I was actually surprised when I realized I couldn't find a single review of EAC with some example rips to show what it could do. Then I was stunned to find a fair number of people responding to the limited reviews I did find by claiming it didn't do anything more than any other ripper. Now at least I have something to refer skeptics to.

1318.2.2009 8:27

Quote:
I was actually surprised when I realized I couldn't find a single review of EAC with some example rips to show what it could do. Then I was stunned to find a fair number of people responding to the limited reviews I did find by claiming it didn't do anything more than any other ripper. Now at least I have something to refer skeptics to.
Well, perhaps it may be that more folks are into video ripping/encoding/downloading than they are into archiving their music cds, or -- in the music world --, busier downloading (and paying for) their iTunes (or other) paid-for music.

It's so funny ..... many years ago I purchased online an audio-cd ripper whose name simply *escapes* me right now. It was about the time when .mp3 files were first becoming known to the general poplace (aka, circa "Mp3s For Dummies"). I was fortunate enough to receive several trouble-shooting responses from the original author himself via his website.

Back then there were no dvd-burners, just cd-roms and writers. I remember getting a TRUCKload of clicks, pops, and other aggravating distortions with my rips, and it was driving me nuts. (Additional program features like those found on EAC hadn't even been invented yet). To be fair to the software, many of these problems originated with the cd-drives of the day, and their inherent problems with being able to read RAW data.

Then along came EAC, the rest is history, and I haven't looked back since. AND -- I'm using an older version with complete success (version 0.95 beta 4 from February/2006).

I listen to music ripped-&-compressed by the EAC/Lame combo every day on my way into work. (No need/desire for iTunes - that's what they invented 'P2P' for!) :-)

-- Mike --

1418.2.2009 9:11

Originally posted by vurbal:
Originally posted by plazma247:
lmao windac http://www.windac.de/ has provided error free CD ripping for over 10 years now. With a syncro buffer that can re-read bad sectors again and again until it gets it right.

I once had a disk so scratched it wouldnt play in anything, it was the only copy i had, so a day and half later after windac had re-read most sectors possibly 80 times or so i got out a perfect audio.

So as the technology has been with us for over 10 years im firmly saying JUST HYPE !!

I'll have to take a look at Windac, but based on the description it would seem to lack several features EAC includes. For starters the website says it can't write CDs. It also doesn't appear to have any image creation abilities. Plus, while there are plugins listed for MP3, TDS, and OGG formats, but nothing for FLAC, APE, or AAC. Also no AccurateRip support. If you look at my tests you'll see that I've shown simply reading the same data all the time doesn't mean accurate results.

Windac looks like an interesting, and possibly quite good program, but it's lacking several features EAC has and doesn't appear to have been in development for a few years now. The last version is from 2005.

As far as EAC being just hype, it does what it says it does. What other metric would you recommend we use?

It rips as accurately as possible, and also verifies using multiple methods so you have the best possible idea how good your backup is compared to the original. It can be used for CD images which can be mounted using Daemon Tools, and it works with any command line encoder. None of these features are hype. They actually work. The fact that another tool includes some of these features doesn't affect how good EAC is any more than EAC's features affect the quality of other tools.
As far as i can see EAC stands for Exact Audio Copy.. basically the syncronisation mode on windac prevents you from getting the pops etc that are caused by other programs not being able to read a sector and just passing onto the next sector. Im assuming that EAC uses a similar re-read method.

Windac's not been re-written since 03, however it will plugin to any standard windows codec, so flacs possible, ok it doesnt burn CD's or create image files as far as i remember.

But my point was pop free CD ripping to lame or loss less has been around since 2000.

1518.2.2009 10:15

Originally posted by plazma247:
As far as i can see EAC stands for Exact Audio Copy.. basically the syncronisation mode on windac prevents you from getting the pops etc that are caused by other programs not being able to read a sector and just passing onto the next sector. Im assuming that EAC uses a similar re-read method.

Windac's not been re-written since 03, however it will plugin to any standard windows codec, so flacs possible, ok it doesnt burn CD's or create image files as far as i remember.

But my point was pop free CD ripping to lame or loss less has been around since 2000.

No one said it was new. In fact EAC has been around since 1998.

Rich Fiscus
@Vurbal on Twitter
AfterDawn Staff Writer

1618.2.2009 10:23

Hello, Plazma - pleased to meet ya! :-)

Quote:
But my point was pop free CD ripping to lame or loss less has been around since 2000.
Agreed. And isn't it wonderful?

I can't actually recall when 'pop-free' ripping came into being. I think that was probably more an end result of advancing drive technology than of actual software expertise. The cd ripping softwares already had it *cased* ! (Tell you the truth, plazma, I've never heard any bad press relating to windac - it's probably a fine piece of software.)

What burns my ass more .... is "copy protection" on music cds - which is really a form of "copy-corruption".

The patents for industry-standard (Sony/Philips et al) red-book music cd ran out years ago, paving the way for ALL SORTS of headaches, aggravation and lawsuits. (Witness Sony's insanely short-sighted, bonehead, infamous, notorius, corporate-crippling ROOT KIT "copy protection" SCAM.) NO present-day cd ripper deals with that sort of s--t, I don't think.

On a less threatening level, there are all kinds of other, ongoing copy-protection red-book-violating screw-ups that companies (like Warner Brothers) enjoy toying around with.

I forget which ZZ-Top album it was, but ONE of the tracks was hopelessly trashed. (It played 'ok' in my dvd player), but EAC gave me nothing but noise-noise-noise. <This is not a limitation of the software.>

Anyway...... nice talking to you ! -- Klingy --

1718.2.2009 13:59

majQa' Klingy,

maj batlh ghoH,

'Iw HIq Hoch ghup lopno'

joq 'oj

chong jatlh QaQ vaj Klingy.


http://mughom.wizage.net/

1822.2.2009 4:16

I'm currently in the process of ripping a CD-R that skips. It was originally burned from FLAC files. I don't know what the problem is (if anybody can suggest possibilities I'm open to them - I use only name-brand blanks and the burner is a Plextor 760A), but EAC seems to be able to copy the tracks. One six-minute-long track, however, took 18 hours.

I'll submit a full report after all the tracks are ripped and I do a listening test. Here's hoping I won't break the 18-hour record.

PS WILL this burn out my drive? (It's a new "Plextor" 820SA)

______________________________________
Okay, here's the update: After I finished ripping all the tracks, I listened to them all the next morning and several had errors - ticking, skips, noise, etc. The log files for these showed quality rates as low as 88%. Some had taken several hours to rip.
So I reinserted the disc and re-ripped the tracks that had errors. To my surprise, most of them ripped with no errors and showed perfect to almost perfect quality. But in ripping the last of the bad tracks - which was also the last track on the disc - errors started to show up.
I wondered what might account for a track taking hours to rip on one attempt and then ripping perfectly on a later attempt and decided it might be heat.
So I pressed the "Skip track" button, ejected the disc, and stuck it in the refrigerator for about 10 minutes. Then I stuck it back in the drive and the track ripped perfectly.

Below are the logs for this same track - the first after ripping the four most difficult tracks (with the disc in the drive for several hours), and the second after chilling the disc for 10 minutes:
____________________
1)
Track 31
Filename I:\IMG\Caldara_Maddalena\CD2\Chi serva la beltā.wav

Suspicious position 0:00:00 - 0:02:46
Suspicious position 0:02:49 - 0:02:50

Peak level 98.5 %
Track quality 88.1 %
Copy CRC 59E78E60
Copy finished
There were errors
_________________________
2)
Track 31
Filename I:\IMG\Caldara_Maddalena\CD2\Chi serva la beltā.wav

Peak level 98.5 %
Track quality 99.9 %
Copy CRC D72A5977
Copy OK

No errors occured
__________________________

Any comments are welcome.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 23 Feb 2009 @ 5:39

1924.5.2009 15:43

I've used EAC for a few years. One thing I have found is that a CD that gives errors and starts taking time when ripping from my DVD-CD burner drive, it often rips quickly and easily if I move it to the CD burner (DVD playback only), which I bought specially for this purpose. I've theories about wavelengths, but who cares, it works. BTW, I set the two drives for different DVD regions - no bearing on EAC, but handy when playing DVDs.

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