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Prime Minister blames UK, US for New Zealand 3 strikes law

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 25 Feb 2009 8:57 User comments (9)

Prime Minister blames UK, US for New Zealand 3 strikes law Originally scheduled to be enforced starting on February 28, New Zealand's controversial 3 strikes law for disconnecting accused P2P pirates has been suspended until March 27. Meanwhile Prime Minister John Key still backs the plan, even going so far as to make up reasons for its existence.
You have to wonder if Key is aware that people are able to get news from outside the country. He seems to be characterizing the idea of disconnecting people from the internet at the whim of record labels as an international standard.

"One of the challenges is that internationally, the equivalent of Section 92A is emerging around the world," said Key. "Australia has a version, the UK has a version."

It's true UK officials were considering a similar plan, but they announced just last month it would have too many legal problems to be viable. And while discussion started in Australia more than a year ago, nothing substantive has come of it yet.

In fact, other than New Zealand the country closest to enacting similar legislation is France. Despite being the first country to seriously consider such a proposal even they haven't put it into action yet.

EU's parliament has also weighed in on the issue, with a majority of MEP's voting last year for language which condemned 3 strikes laws. An amendment to last year's Guy Bono Report on Cultural industries in Europe, which passed with overwhelming support, said they were in conflict with civil liberties and human rights.

Key also tried to blame the US, saying "If New Zealand was to sign a free-trade agreement with America for instance, we would need an equivalent of Section 92A." Of course only attempt at such legislation so far in the US was an amendment a California Senator tried to sneak into the recent stimulus bill. Even that law, which would have allowed ISPs to monitor traffic for copyright infringement, didn't mention disconnection.

So if it's not the international standard Key claims, and clearly it isn't, why should anyone in New Zealand who isn't running a record label be in favor of this law?

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9 user comments

125.2.2009 9:16

Typical of the wriggling lying scumbags pushing this sh!te.

Laughably lame of the jerk to try saying 'wan't me, the others made me do it', though.

225.2.2009 11:43

We need more politicians like this, so we can see right threw them like a glass of water.

325.2.2009 11:45
leonle
Inactive

This is a very important decision,don't know how it is going to turn out!!!

425.2.2009 12:01

Yes it is very important. methinks Key should do more reading on the internets and learn how they wurkz. The google is his friend.

525.2.2009 23:42

As a New Zealander, I have to say this is a load of bollox. The law was drafted by the previous Labour government (Judith Tizzard) and they attempted to have it rammed through before being ousted.
John Key supported the law but has postponed it due to public protest until copyright holders and ISP's can come to an agreement. He has stated that if no agreement can be reached then the whole thing will be canned.

625.2.2009 23:44

lmao @ free trade with the states,firstly we don't have anything to offer other than meat products & just that alone would cause a fiasco with the over subsidized farmers of the US,i can see the protests & road blockades along with cow pat flinging machinery pointed towards the white house..lol.. would be better off sticking to free trade with the Asian & Indian markets as they're the growing markets closer to us,yeah anyway there's a number of protests going on,a few popular websites had blackouts,talk back radio's a buzz etc,so it's not quite done n dusted yet

726.2.2009 0:01

Originally posted by scorpNZ:
lmao @ free trade with the states,firstly we don't have anything to offer other than meat products & just that alone would cause a fiasco with the over subsidized farmers of the US,i can see the protests & road blockades along with cow pat flinging machinery pointed towards the white house..lol.. would be better off sticking to free trade with the Asian & Indian markets as they're the growing markets closer to us,yeah anyway there's a number of protests going on,a few popular websites had blackouts,talk back radio's a buzz etc,so it's not quite done n dusted yet
The US is a huge market and we have plenty to offer besides meat and dairy. I work for an engineering company specializing in heavy transport and every time our dollar bottoms out we have suited up yanks strutting through our workshop. We have made a lot of money shipping our products to the states. On the other hand, the asian market is a direct threat to us, we expect a good wage for our skills and know how, they are willing to work for a cup of rice.

826.2.2009 5:16

I thought the New Zealand PM was a suspiciously butch woman who looked like a brick builder in drag with a voice like Clint Eastwood in Gran Torino.
I need to download a politics google update to my cyber unit :)

927.2.2009 16:26

Quote:
Originally posted by scorpNZ:
lmao @ free trade with the states,firstly we don't have anything to offer other than meat products & just that alone would cause a fiasco with the over subsidized farmers of the US,i can see the protests & road blockades along with cow pat flinging machinery pointed towards the white house..lol.. would be better off sticking to free trade with the Asian & Indian markets as they're the growing markets closer to us,yeah anyway there's a number of protests going on,a few popular websites had blackouts,talk back radio's a buzz etc,so it's not quite done n dusted yet
The US is a huge market and we have plenty to offer besides meat and dairy. I work for an engineering company specializing in heavy transport and every time our dollar bottoms out we have suited up yanks strutting through our workshop. We have made a lot of money shipping our products to the states. On the other hand, the asian market is a direct threat to us, we expect a good wage for our skills and know how, they are willing to work for a cup of rice.
20 years ago it was Taiwan not long after Korean now it's China that's producing cheap n nasty crap,India will more than likley be the next,the Asian market is more important to us than you realize,it's the biggest growing market & the more growth then the more materials,trade & skills they'll need,company's like fonterra will take advantage of it including coal exporters,iron sand & most probably yours,considering the economic climate now we need free trade deals with these markets more than ever

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