AfterDawn: Tech news

'Three strikes' laws will be expensive for ISPs

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 06 Mar 2009 22:42 User comments (7)

'Three strikes' laws will be expensive for ISPs According to new reports coming out of France, any ISP willing to join the RIAA in its "three strikes" your out laws against piracy will have to spend a lot of money to enforce the rules, as much as 16 million USD per year.
Although the laws have been struck down by the EP and the German government, they have been adopted in New Zealand and is moving towards adoption in France, where President Nicolas Sarkozy is a big proponent.

The 'three strikes' rules would give alleged pirates two email or written warnings from their ISP before they have their Internet connection completely shut off and their name blacklisted.

The French newspaper La Liberation added that if France were to adopt the rules, the bill could "trigger around 10,000 warning e-mails, 3000 letters and 1000 decisions about Internet cut-offs per day," forcing the ISPs to hire new workers and incur new costs.

Non-compliance with the RIAA and MPAA would also be expensive for the ISPs, as it is expected that any declined warning message will cost the ISPs a $6000 USD fine.

Previous Next  

7 user comments

17.3.2009 0:33

you didn't actually think the RIAA would pay for there own idea did you.

i wish the government of the world wasn't so dame stupid and realize the leaches RIAA MPAA and all of there deferent names. they're just interested in one thing there own pockets.

27.3.2009 4:44

This sounds stupid! If you end up cutting off 1000 connections who is going to be your customer? Where are you going to get $ to run your ISP business from? If Mc Donalds told 1000 customers a day they are going to be cut off because they were too fat then eventually they would run out of customers & Us FAT Americans still want our fast food & will just go to another Place to eat our selves to death! (this is not blaming fat people that eat out too much i eat out all the flippin time)

37.3.2009 9:02
Ascrapper
Inactive

this is a ridiculous means of stopping piracy. it seems to me that they resorted to extreme measures before trying rational means like maybe lowering the price of movies and CD's. And its not like there's not error in this idea... millions of $ VS. $6000 hmm plus the fact that you might lose customers with the more expensive way they are really screwing over ISP's this way.

47.3.2009 10:35

Why not close cable tv services to house holds that dare record shows.

If you make criminals out of 1/3rd of your users perhaps their is something wrong with the basics of how you are allowed to enforce your rights....

57.3.2009 14:02

Grab all ye can right NOW boys, even if it be illegal contraband, because in 5 years you might not be able to. It will all be GONE. Encrypt all your data. Hard drive, DVDs, USB drives, etc.

Truecrypt is your friend.

616.3.2009 9:55

Originally posted by DXR88:
you didn't actually think the RIAA would pay for there own idea did you.

i wish the government of the world wasn't so dame stupid and realize the leaches RIAA MPAA and all of there deferent names. they're just interested in one thing there own pockets.
What you're missing is the media mafia are a major component of the world government. It will need a media mafia to push it's agenda, brainwash the people, and keep the wealthier (and gun toting americans (I love the 2nd ammendment!!) nations complacent.

Folks, this is only the beginning. Get used to it, and learn how to stay under the radar. This will be a constantly evolving process, but the information war has begun, and you at least know one of your main enemies.

716.3.2009 12:09

I am sure the ISPs will take a middle ground and maybe hit 100 per day instead. I agree with some of the last posts. Get ready because P2P as we know it will get crushed sooner than later. There are less convienient P2P methods that some will use keeping up the sharing. They are harder to use and harder to trace.

My advice is priortize what you want and get to it before you are cut off.

Comments have been disabled for this article.

News archive