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Counting Crows expands horizons by ditching label

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 18 Mar 2009 10:47 User comments (4)

Counting Crows expands horizons by ditching label Counting Crows frontman Adam Duritz announced on the band's website that they'll be leaving their label, Geffen, after 18 years. Although he didn't specifically say they won't be moving to another label, his explanation suggests that's the case.
"A lot of people think it's a tough time to be a band but we don't feel that way," wrote Duritz. "The internet opens a world of limitless possibility, where the only boundaries are the boundaries of your own imagination. We want a chance to push those boundaries back as far as we can. Unfortunately, the directions we want to go and the opportunities we want to pursue are often things that our label is simply not allowed to do."

Counting Crows may not be the huge sellers they were a decade ago, but they are exactly the sort of band whose sales have traditionally offset the risk (and losses) from new artists.

The fewer established artists the labels can keep, the less money they have to develop new talent. The less new talent they have, the fewer established artists they will have in the future.

As recently as ten years ago artists signed with a major label to expand their opportunities. It's telling that now they drop their labels for the same reason.

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4 user comments

118.3.2009 13:13

Good for them.

218.3.2009 18:09

Quote:
... but they are exactly the sort of band whose sales have traditionally offset the risk (and losses) from new artists.
Really???? I think this is the "sort of band" that makes a lot of money on their first album, and then turns into a money looser for the record company.

I don't think Geffen is too worried about loosing Counting Crows... They will still make a few bucks every time someone buys a copy of August And Everything After, or when someone buys one of the old tracks from iTunes. It's not like when Madonna's contract expired and she left Warner. (Of course, Warner still makes money off of her old CDs/tracks too.)

P.S
I'm not saying this is a bad thing. It's probably good for the band, good for Geffen, and good for the customers/fans.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 18 Mar 2009 @ 18:17

318.3.2009 20:11

Yeah, drop your label after they got you rich, famous, and well known. Im sure thats easy for them, but i bet there's a ton of bands/artists that would KILL for a record deal and some exposure.

419.3.2009 12:29

Quote:
Unfortunately, the directions we want to go and the opportunities we want to pursue are often things that our label is simply not allowed to do."
This is the most telling quote. It's something we've all known. The industry will not change. They refuse to change. Duritz is helping explore other options that are available alongside other established acts.

Quote:
Yeah, drop your label after they got you rich, famous, and well known. Im sure thats easy for them, but i bet there's a ton of bands/artists that would KILL for a record deal and some exposure.
The idea is to get to a point where new artists wouldn't "kill" for a Label recording contract. I don't feel bad for the Labels. They use the artist for mere profit. It's all just business. There should be no "loyalty" ties or feelings of guilt for leaving such a business relationship once the contract is fullfilled. The band made their money and fullfilled their contract...so why be tied to a company that won't let you create how you want to create? Aparrently, they presented their ideas and they were shot down. Should they stick around just because Geffen "got them rich?" They followed the rules - produced a few hit songs and Geffen made millions. Time to move on.

The idea is finding another way. Like he said, the internet opens up so many more possibilities and opportunities. Once these are explored, there will eventually be no need to depend on a single entity to be successful. So it will take the combined efforts of many established artists to pave the way.

The goal:
Give the artist creative freedom.

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