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US gives information on secretive international piracy deal

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 11 Apr 2009 18:39 User comments (7)

US gives information on secretive international piracy deal Details have emerged about the secretive global negotiations to fight copyright infringement and the movement of pirated material across the world. The proposed Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) has received a lot of speculation due to the secretive nature of the negotiations, with some digital rights lobbyists criticizing the lack of detail. However, the Obama administration's goal to improve transparency has made some details public.
The information released shows how 37 countries are working to find a way to cut copyright infringement and counterfeiting globally. Interestingly, the summary indicates that the countries are trying to figure out how to (if at all) involve Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in the fight against piracy.

ACTA also considers measures to stop the flow of copyright infringing material from moving across borders. This led to some fears that there would be checks of computers and MP3 players to find pirated content. However, the outline makes that very unlikely, as it makes it clear the interest is only with industrial-scale importing and exporting of counterfeit material.

"Cross-border trade in counterfeit and pirated goods is a growing global problem that often involves organized criminal networks," the material reads. It said that ACTA might include "a de minimis exception that could permit travellers to bring in goods for personal use". The treaty would harmonize what "scale" of activity needs to be reached before infringement becomes criminal, and how the authorities will deal with it.

More Info: http://ustr.gov/ (PDF)

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7 user comments

111.4.2009 20:49

OLD news. Just a rehash of news LAST YEAR.

212.4.2009 6:25

The PDF doc the article links to was released just days ago, the news from last year was that the negotiations were in progress, this is offering up some details... as in, not speculation... never mind...

312.4.2009 6:41

Countries can't seem to agree on ways to stop transportation of stolen vehicles, the sex slave trade, weapons, but somehow stopping piracy of software and movies rank at the top of each country. Ya I know piracy is an issue, but I have to wonder at what extent our personal rights and freedoms will be taken away to achieve this goal.

412.4.2009 21:28

We have RIGHTS ??
"freedom's just another word for nuthin' left to lose..." J.J.

513.4.2009 0:41

Originally posted by badkrma:
Countries can't seem to agree on ways to stop transportation of stolen vehicles, the sex slave trade, weapons, but somehow stopping piracy of software and movies rank at the top of each country.
Excellent point, these crimes will forever take a backseat to heavy handed corporations who carry significant financial clout.

614.4.2009 4:18
vanessa80
Inactive

Hello, everyone!
I am a Spammer, this is my first visit.Happy to see your credit card details!

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 14 Apr 2009 @ 13:24

717.4.2009 12:39

veyron, good point, but you don't know who you are dealing with. The RIAA and the rest of the meduia mafia is a well oiled machine as far as lobbing. I would be surprised if they didn't get their way when countries can't protect their borders for drugs, guns or anything else.

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