AfterDawn: Tech news

GE introduces micro-holographic disc with 500GB capacity

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 28 Apr 2009 0:37 User comments (23)

GE introduces micro-holographic disc with 500GB capacity General Electric has introduced a micro-holographic disc that can store up to 500GB of data today, aimed at the archive industry and users with massive movie and music collections.
The company knows the market for the disc is small now, but believes it can eventually be used in standalone players, just like DVDs and Blu-rays are now. DVDs can hold up to 8.5GB and BD-50 can hold up to 50GB.

Micro-holographic discs can store so much data because the store information in three dimensions, rather than just having the info written on the surface of the disc.

Brian Lawrence, head of GE's Holographic Storage team added, "Very recently, the team at GE has made dramatic improvements in the materials enabling significant increases in the amount of light that can be reflected by the holograms."

Now that the higher reflexivity is a possibility, the technology can be used in new standalone players that are backwards compatible with DVD and Blu-ray discs.

Added GE: "The hardware and formats are so similar to current optical storage technology that the micro-holographic players will enable consumers to play back their CDs, DVDs and Blu-ray discs."

"GE's breakthrough is a huge step toward bringing our next generation holographic storage technology to the everyday consumer," noted Lawrence in a separate statement.

Lawerence concluded, "The day when you can store your entire high definition movie collection on one disc and support high resolution formats like 3D television is closer than you think."

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23 user comments

128.4.2009 1:02

I bet this is what they'll use for UHDV TVs

228.4.2009 2:40

Just think...Blu-Ray resolution without the ugly pixelisation of blu-ray. Maybe they could even get have a quality from rate for those of use who can see faster than 30fps!

...And I thought they just made kitchen appliances and jet engines.

328.4.2009 8:45

Yawn.

Wake me up when the players are $99 or less and the new release movies are $15 or less.

428.4.2009 9:23

I think by the time this becomes viable for mass commercialization, Blu-rays will have reach their potential 8 layers (or more) ... I wonder how the market will react then.

Originally posted by KillerBug:
Just think...Blu-Ray resolution without the ugly pixelisation of blu-ray. Maybe they could even get have a quality from rate for those of use who can see faster than 30fps!
Pixelisation? Are you talking about film grain? Because if that is what you refer to, no matter the capacity of the medium you put it on, a movie will have film grain. The only way to get rid of film grain is to use DNR (Dynamic Noise Reduction) but then you lose detail.

Whether or not film grain should be left 'as is' or be treated with DNR and edge enhancement is another discussion, I think, which isn't connected to the medium (Blu-ray or other).

When I watch movies that were mastered directly from their digital source (like Wall-E, or Cars) on Blu-ray, I fail to see any pixelization.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 28 Apr 2009 @ 9:26

528.4.2009 12:12
LissenUp
Inactive

Originally posted by KillerBug:
Just think...Blu-Ray resolution without the ugly pixelisation of blu-ray. Maybe they could even get have a quality from rate for those of use who can see faster than 30fps!

...And I thought they just made kitchen appliances and jet engines.
Wait Wait Wait............You may have remarked on something I am just now experiencing and looking for help on.

I just bought a blu-ray player for my PC because it's basically an HTPC and has been for about 9 years now so everything is done though it for entertainment. When I watch blu-rays, dark parts of the picture (i.e. a dark jacket or dark room or a black car) appear kind of fuzzy or pixelated. The bright, sun-shiny parts are clear as a bell and look great but not the dark.

I have an ATI Radeon X1950 Pro Crossfired with another identical and thinking that it's that very detail causing this. I am planning to go out and buy an HD 4890 thinking that will cure this. Any ideas?????

628.4.2009 13:28

I just bought a blu-ray player for my PC because it's basically an HTPC and has been for about 9 years now so everything is done though it for entertainment. When I watch blu-rays, dark parts of the picture (i.e. a dark jacket or dark room or a black car) appear kind of fuzzy or pixelated. The bright, sun-shiny parts are clear as a bell and look great but not the dark.

ideas?????


LCD Monitor? I have one that the blacks dont do so well on. The other looks great.

728.4.2009 14:58

LCD monitors can have a huge effect on the "deepness" of "blacks" in blu-ray films. One 24' monitor might have great blacks but another 24' monitor might have bad color saturation/macroblocking. You get what you pay for.

828.4.2009 19:02
kubapolak
Inactive

I wonder how long will it take to record stuff on a disc of that size?

928.4.2009 23:11

well all i can say is hope you wont get a cioaster fm this bad boy and if you do hope it dont cost you an arm and a leg

1029.4.2009 0:18

Considering that the majority of my collection consists of Xvid rips (I'll get more MKV when I get a good lcd monitor. Mine is pretty old, goes only to 1024x768. Plan on getting a 1920x1200 or 1080p) and those were always good enough for me, I doubt I'll care about Blu-Ray anytime soon. Let alone these micro-holographic discs. Too bandwidth-intensive to pirate because of bandwidth limits set by ISPs and the blank media is too expensive. Movies are an expensive form of home entertainment. The up-front price is lower than a video game ($15+ compared to $60-70, and video games are overpriced to begin with) but a movie offers far less entertainment hours.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 29 Apr 2009 @ 0:26

1129.4.2009 3:24

Thats great and all but it will take 10ish years for them to prefect the discs and get the tech cheap enough for mass consumption.

Blu ray is having issues enough with 50GB production , you might could get more out of it but the between comparability and bad disc ratios a better/cheaper technology will most likely replace it in 10 years.

1229.4.2009 15:10

It'll be ready to mass produce and shortly after they'll be a new technology emerging.
mmmmmmmm sound familiar???

1329.4.2009 15:12

Originally posted by lawndog:
It'll be ready to mass produce and shortly after they'll be a new technology emerging.
mmmmmmmm sound familiar???
Hopefully something not reliant on once write discs that dose not cost an arm and a leg........

1429.4.2009 16:37

Originally posted by kyo28:
I think by the time this becomes viable for mass commercialization, Blu-rays will have reach their potential 8 layers (or more) ... I wonder how the market will react then.
True but an eight layer Blu-Ray is "only" 200GB (25GB per layer) as opposed to this 500GB technology.

My main question is how is GE going expand the storage limits of this holographic technology? I am assuming they could potentially "layer" it, but I don't know how.

If they can layer it with each being 500GB that would get to insane storage sizes very quickly. It's nice to see them thinking in an adoptive state and saying "We can build this with complete CD/DVD/Blu-Ray compatiblilty."

1529.4.2009 16:41

Quote:
Originally posted by kyo28:
I think by the time this becomes viable for mass commercialization, Blu-rays will have reach their potential 8 layers (or more) ... I wonder how the market will react then.
True but an eight layer Blu-Ray is "only" 200GB (25GB per layer) as opposed to this 500GB technology.

My main question is how is GE going expand the storage limits of this holographic technology? I am assuming they could potentially "layer" it, but I don't know how.

If they can layer it with each being 500GB that would get to insane storage sizes very quickly. It's nice to see them thinking in an adoptive state and saying "We can build this with complete CD/DVD/Blu-Ray compatiblilty."
Ya but the BR tech would be a quarter the cost if not less, it all comes down to if corporate will back it as a widely used format...and I could see that happening with this or something like in in 10 years but BR is pretty much here to stay for awhile..

1629.4.2009 18:51

I personally think that Blu-ray will be the last, widely accepted optical disk format.
I think the future will be in solid state memory like SD cards and such. Already the cost is very low. Now they just need to increase capacity. I'm thinking that that should be fairly easy. The technology is already there. It's easily scalable up to virtually any size chip you need. If you only need a small amount of memory then you can use very inexpensive small chips and if you need alot you can pay more and get a larger one. They work everywhere.
Sure, compared to a Hard drive they may be a bit on the slow side, but how does their speed compare to optical disks?

With the availability of cheap SD cards and USB Hard drives I've already all but uninstalled my optical DVD drive. I hate when I have to convert for someone who can't play a file and must have DVD format, ect ect.

The future is Solid state, not optical...
But then, I don't own a multi-billion dollar company! :D

1729.4.2009 20:19

Originally posted by ThePastor:
I personally think that Blu-ray will be the last, widely accepted optical disk format.
I think the future will be in solid state memory like SD cards and such. Already the cost is very low. Now they just need to increase capacity. I'm thinking that that should be fairly easy. The technology is already there. It's easily scalable up to virtually any size chip you need. If you only need a small amount of memory then you can use very inexpensive small chips and if you need alot you can pay more and get a larger one. They work everywhere.
Sure, compared to a Hard drive they may be a bit on the slow side, but how does their speed compare to optical disks?

With the availability of cheap SD cards and USB Hard drives I've already all but uninstalled my optical DVD drive. I hate when I have to convert for someone who can't play a file and must have DVD format, ect ect.

The future is Solid state, not optical...
But then, I don't own a multi-billion dollar company! :D
The trouble is 32GB of flash memory is about 50-100$ even if you halve it twice(12-25) in the coming 5 years its not going to be enough.

1829.4.2009 21:32

This would be the new and best way to archive historic files for the new age. I think it will be great but i hoppe it will be reliable seeing how this is a big amount of storage and i think they have to make sure it is very durable.

1930.4.2009 18:48

How many of these disks do you think windows 10 will come on?
And what will be the hard disk requirements for the burners? Bluray (for a 50GB disk) recommends with most software to have at least 60 GB free for encoding the video into bluray format. Assuming the same trend, these 500GB disks will require 600GB of free space... The average American (or Canadian) has less than 500GB of total space on their computer let alone free space. If this medium is to become popular we are going to have to create extremely large extremely cheap hard drives (in the 10+ TB range at $100 or less). And, for the pirates out there, you would need to download enough video's to fill that. So 500GB of converted video (minus room for the menu) at 1GB/movie (divx quality) at 2 hr conversion/movie (assuming converting 2 hour movies) is... 1000 hours (41.6 days)BEFORE burn time. And rendering the menu system for 500 movies would take forever too.
This meduim will be useless for movie pirates. Good for backup of data (assuming can write more than once to the disk or it supports multisession).

203.8.2009 14:57
H08
Inactive

@DVDBack23

for some reason the article "Catalog Your Music - 4 Programs Compared" is being redirected to this article

213.8.2009 16:37

@ H08

Just click the "news" link in that articles description.
(edit) Never mind. whatever you click on in that article will bring you back here.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 03 Aug 2009 @ 16:39

223.8.2009 23:16

Quote:
Lawerence concluded, "The day when you can store your entire high definition movie collection on one disc and support high resolution formats like 3D television is closer than you think."
This quote is what got me. WOW Hmm, for us to do this wouldn't that mean we would have to rip and back up our High Def movies? I thought that was a bad thing we shouldn't do. [insert sarcasm here]

233.8.2009 23:18

Originally posted by H08:
@DVDBack23

for some reason the article "Catalog Your Music - 4 Programs Compared" is being redirected to this article
Good point. That's what I thought when I clicked on then when I came to read the article I was like WTF ?

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