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Blockbuster DVD rental kiosks expand to Big Y stores

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 30 Aug 2009 0:18 User comments (24)

Blockbuster DVD rental kiosks expand to Big Y stores Blockbuster along with partner NCR, is expanding its Blockbuster Express DVD rental kiosks to Big Y grocery stores in the states of Connecticut and Massachusetts.
The kiosks should be in all 57 Big Y locations by September 3rd, says the companies.

NCR currently has over 400 Blockbuster Express machines, in Publix and other grocery stores. Just like rival Redbox, the Blockbuster kiosks rent DVDs for $1 USD a night.

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24 user comments

130.8.2009 1:30

I wonder if they have to wait 1 month to get new releases for their machines.

230.8.2009 4:37

too funny! BTW what is up with all the "Comments Disabled" posts? most noticed on the PS3 articles what gives?

330.8.2009 4:37

Originally posted by ydkjman:
I wonder if they have to wait 1 month to get new releases for their machines.
probably not.

430.8.2009 4:40

Originally posted by ripxrush:
BTW what is up with all the "Comments Disabled" posts? most noticed on the PS3 articles what gives?
people forget there typing to other people.

i don't see why they waist there time writing such article's if there just going to disable them.

530.8.2009 10:24

haha yea


630.8.2009 11:17

So are the big studios gonna block new releases from blockbuster aswell? If they don't then redbox will win their case for sure.

730.8.2009 11:52

I'm still missing how this is Blockbusters big plan to topple Netflix? Until they allow streaming of movies and "box" rentals of blu-rays all for the same cost as Netflix i still don't see this as a plus.

Besides it's just more of the same from BB. Take someone elses idea and make it horrible and expensive then make it your own. It's going to take decades for BB to clean up their public image as being an evil empire that screwed people with overcharges. I'll personally NEVER give them business again. I hope the studios DO give them movies first so Redbox can sue the life out of BB and the Studios for conspiring a monopoly.

830.8.2009 13:45

Quote:
too funny! BTW what is up with all the "Comments Disabled" posts? most noticed on the PS3 articles what gives?
They are disabled on selected articles for a while because a bunch of idiots keep starting trouble because they have nothing better to do with their time. It's not confined to PS3, there just has been more PS3 news since the slim came out. Just waiting on new ways to handle the (ab)users on our side.

If they want to start some "My favorite company is better than your favorite company" argument, and make it personal, they can do it via private message one on one, or start a forum thread or something, but these comments are possible to comment on the news. Opposing views to each other and disagreements are perfectly fine, but when adults act like 10 year olds (insult to 10 year olds.. sorry), that's where I draw the line.

Just to add a note too that the response to the comments being disabled that we have been receiving are about 90% positive. Among the rest, some feel that it's not nice to our ordinary users to have to put up with temporarily (totally agree, sorry) and I think I only got one abusive comment toward me since it from someone who didn't ever seem to learn to spell correctly so I took it in my stride. ;-)

930.8.2009 14:31

Stupid question don't we have organic dyes now that last for a week?

Would it not be more cost effective to "rent" DVD-rs with a wider selection of film put on them but they are copy protected and will fall apart after a few days.

1030.8.2009 15:12

Quote:
Stupid question don't we have organic dyes now that last for a week?

Would it not be more cost effective to "rent" DVD-rs with a wider selection of film put on them but they are copy protected and will fall apart after a few days.
I think the problem with self-destructing DVDs is finding a reliable way to distribute them so you can be guaranteed that they won't start to decay or oxidize before they should, so I think that would mean you'd need a special protective case to be distributed with each.

There are also questions about the environmental impact of what would eventually turn out to be millions more useless discs being thrown out each year.

1130.8.2009 15:18

Quote:
Quote:
Stupid question don't we have organic dyes now that last for a week?

Would it not be more cost effective to "rent" DVD-rs with a wider selection of film put on them but they are copy protected and will fall apart after a few days.
I think the problem with self-destructing DVDs is finding a reliable way to distribute them so you can be guaranteed that they won't start to decay or oxidize before they should, so I think that would mean you'd need a special protective case to be distributed with each.

There are also questions about the environmental impact of what would eventually turn out to be millions more useless discs being thrown out each year.
Well make it so they die off in less than a month if you can limit 60% to 10-20 days and the other 40% in less than 40 it would work.

Make it so the kiosks are sealed and maybe are filled with a non very toxic/flammable gas that keeps the discs fresh once hit with oxygen for a few minutes or a few hours it begins to decay and takes days to become unreadable.

edit
Biodegradable discs make it so there would no real environmental impact, but the most annoying thing to do is the data to be unreadable after a few days or weeks.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 30 Aug 2009 @ 15:25

1230.8.2009 16:22

the disc may be able to degrade, but what about the metallic wafer.

you'd have to reinvent the wheel, i believe it would be much easier to create a type of super risen to make the discs resistant to damage.
like Dupoint or Kevlar.

1330.8.2009 16:25

Originally posted by DXR88:
the disc may be able to degrade, but what about the metallic wafer.

you'd have to reinvent the wheel, i believe it would be much easier to create a type of super risen to make the discs resistant to damage.
like Dupoint or Kevlar.
I wonder if it can be made from less resistant/less toxic metals something that is able to degrade over time.

1430.8.2009 16:32

Quote:
Originally posted by DXR88:
the disc may be able to degrade, but what about the metallic wafer.

you'd have to reinvent the wheel, i believe it would be much easier to create a type of super risen to make the discs resistant to damage.
like Dupoint or Kevlar.
I wonder if it can be made from less resistant/less toxic metals something that is able to degrade over time.
i think lead free solder and the horror it wrought when people say less toxic.

1530.8.2009 16:34

Quote:
Quote:
Originally posted by DXR88:
the disc may be able to degrade, but what about the metallic wafer.

you'd have to reinvent the wheel, i believe it would be much easier to create a type of super risen to make the discs resistant to damage.
like Dupoint or Kevlar.
I wonder if it can be made from less resistant/less toxic metals something that is able to degrade over time.
i think lead free solder and the horror it wrought when people say less toxic.

Ya but for once this will be for something that's disposable :P

1630.8.2009 17:02

@Zippy

There was a 7 Eleven near me that used to sell disposable DVD's. They came in little Vacu-Pak bags (like coffee) and would become completely unreadable in about a week.

I never purchased one, so I don't know what material the disc was, but they did sell for about $2.99 each.

1730.8.2009 17:20

Originally posted by Unfocused:
@Zippy

There was a 7 Eleven near me that used to sell disposable DVD's. They came in little Vacu-Pak bags (like coffee) and would become completely unreadable in about a week.

I never purchased one, so I don't know what material the disc was, but they did sell for about $2.99 each.
yes however they where not bio-degradable. they where caned because of the environmental concerns.

i think all trash should be incinerated, instead of dumped.

1830.8.2009 22:38

Quote:
Originally posted by Unfocused:
@Zippy

There was a 7 Eleven near me that used to sell disposable DVD's. They came in little Vacu-Pak bags (like coffee) and would become completely unreadable in about a week.

I never purchased one, so I don't know what material the disc was, but they did sell for about $2.99 each.
yes however they where not bio-degradable. they where caned because of the environmental concerns.

i think all trash should be incinerated, instead of dumped.
They were canned because very few people bought them. They were sold with a very dumb marketing plan, being placed in Office Depot, Staples, and a few gas stations...the business croud had no use for them, and the gas station croud didn't like the idea of spending the jacked up gas station price for a movie that would self-destruct.

I bought one from Office Depot to give it a test. It worked prefect when I tested it on the 5th day open, so it was a working technology. Sure, they might not have been bio-degradable, but they were recyclable.

I guess I am still dreaming: A website that delivers full quality streaming DVD & BluRay to your computer...with a collection that makes the netflix dvd colection look tiny...and for a low monthly fee. This would virtualy stamp out all video piracy, at least in areas with good broadband.

1930.8.2009 22:41

Quote:
Quote:
Originally posted by Unfocused:
@Zippy

There was a 7 Eleven near me that used to sell disposable DVD's. They came in little Vacu-Pak bags (like coffee) and would become completely unreadable in about a week.

I never purchased one, so I don't know what material the disc was, but they did sell for about $2.99 each.
yes however they where not bio-degradable. they where caned because of the environmental concerns.

i think all trash should be incinerated, instead of dumped.
They were canned because very few people bought them. They were sold with a very dumb marketing plan, being placed in Office Depot, Staples, and a few gas stations...the business croud had no use for them, and the gas station croud didn't like the idea of spending the jacked up gas station price for a movie that would self-destruct.

I bought one from Office Depot to give it a test. It worked prefect when I tested it on the 5th day open, so it was a working technology. Sure, they might not have been bio-degradable, but they were recyclable.

I guess I am still dreaming: A website that delivers full quality streaming DVD & BluRay to your computer...with a collection that makes the netflix dvd colection look tiny...and for a low monthly fee. This would virtualy stamp out all video piracy, at least in areas with good broadband.
But they wont be able to resell it to you, and they need a scape goat that's always there...then again they have the consumer to complain about...

2031.8.2009 0:38

i still think media should have some type of super risen, if all disc's where re-writable and where near indestructible there would be no need to throw them out. any thing is bio-degradable it may take 1000 years to completely return to earth.

2131.8.2009 3:01

If they lasted forever, then the 5-day-burnout idea is useless anyway. BluRays are already too hard; this is why they are so crack-happy.

2231.8.2009 4:54

Originally posted by KillerBug:
If they lasted forever, then the 5-day-burnout idea is useless anyway. BluRays are already too hard; this is why they are so crack-happy.
Crack happy as in cracking protection or the disc cracking after a few dozen months of use?

2331.8.2009 12:14

I remember those disposable discs. They were called divx discs. There were also DVD-D and Flexplay discs. People would pay $4 for these things, and have 48 hours to watch it. After that 48 hours was over, you can keep the disc and order another 48 hours of the disc for around $3.50. Very stupid idea. If this had become dominant, we would be paying per view for our movies at this point.

2431.8.2009 13:51

Originally posted by MReprogle:
I remember those disposable discs. They were called divx discs. There were also DVD-D and Flexplay discs. People would pay $4 for these things, and have 48 hours to watch it. After that 48 hours was over, you can keep the disc and order another 48 hours of the disc for around $3.50. Very stupid idea. If this had become dominant, we would be paying per view for our movies at this point.
If its going to be per view then the price needs to be no more than 1$ a disc or 3$ for something that will last a week....

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