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UK Government won't provide ACTA documents to elected MPs

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 21 Jan 2010 10:53 User comments (7)

UK Government won't provide ACTA documents to elected MPs The secrecy over the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) currently being negotiated by countries from across the world has hit elected MPs in the UK, who cannot get access to any ACTA documents. Junior business minister David Lammy said documents related to ACTA will not be put in the House of Commons library, due to the desire for other countries to keep the negotiations secret.
"Although I am sympathetic to the view that ACTA negotiations should be more transparent and I have instructed my officials to press for more transparency, we are not in a position to place the drafts held by my Department in the Library," Lammy said. "Disclosure of any documents without the agreement of all our ACTA negotiating partners would damage the United Kingdom's international relations."

He continued: "This would harm our ability to protect, promote and secure an outcome in the UK's interest, and the premature release of documents that are not agreed and not fully developed may also have a negative effect on the Government's reputation."

The European Commission, which is also involved in the negotiations, said that ACTA will not go any further than current EU policies for the enforcement of intellectual property rights, and dismissed claims that ACTA will leave to border searches of iPods and other gadgets in case they contain pirated multimedia content.

"EU customs, frequently confronted with traffics of drugs, weapons or people, do neither have the time nor the legal basis to look for a couple of pirated songs on an iPod music player or laptop computer, and there is no intention to change this," the Commission said. Measures in ACTA that involve border security would deal with the trade of counterfeit products instead.

In December, EuroISPA, a trade association for Internet Service Providers, warned that ACTA could be used to force a policy of "graduated response" to deal with illegal file sharing. Graduated response means basically that offending users will be warned a number of times before being suspended from the ISP if the illegal file sharing persists.

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7 user comments

121.1.2010 11:27

Quote:
EU customs, frequently confronted with traffics of drugs, weapons or people, do neither have the time nor the legal basis to look for a couple of pirated songs on an iPod music player or laptop computer, and there is no intention to change this,
just like the police are so busy trying to catch burglars murderers and thieves they don't have enough time to stuff envelopes with fixed penalty notices for offences caught on gatso's

221.1.2010 13:10
av_verbal
Inactive

Quote:
Quote:
EU customs, frequently confronted with traffics of drugs, weapons or people, do neither have the time nor the legal basis to look for a couple of pirated songs on an iPod music player or laptop computer, and there is no intention to change this,
just like the police are so busy trying to catch burglars murderers and thieves they don't have enough time to stuff envelopes with fixed penalty notices for offences caught on gatso's
They do when the IFPI (Sony & Co) grease the governments pockets.

321.1.2010 14:16

HA HA........ god call the MP3 police we have a bad image post!!!

421.1.2010 22:58

When they made seatbelts mandatory, they said they would never pull anyone over for not wearing one...now they have checkpoints!

Never believe anything a police officer tells you, and you should run if someone from the government says the words, "I am here to help you".

522.1.2010 7:16

Quote:
Never believe anything a police officer tells you, and you should run if someone from the government says the words, "I am here to help you".
1 of the funniest things ive seen on a real life cop show was a police officer who said "im a police officer i dont lie"

custom built gaming pc from early 2010,ps2 with 15 games all original,ps3 500gbs with 5 games all original,yamaha amp and 5.1channel surround sound speakers,46inch sony lcd smart tv.

625.3.2010 15:11

Governments are supposed to serve the public , NOT International meglomaniacal corporations . They really are insane and so are Governments for going along with it. How can it be possible that these scumbags can insist on secrecy , when we all know its because if they can do it on the quiet , it'll cost less for them and of course easier if there are no objections from the public.

It's quite simple ,ANY laws passed in the uk should be open to full debate . If they dont like the idea of that then dump any proceedings , as anything less would be UNDEMOCRATIC..

Unfortunately we all know in the UK as elsewhere , any politician involved in the process would have been entirely bought and paid for by the lawyers now running the media industry .

Where's the Freedom of Information act? and they (Govt) cant cite terrorism as the reason why we cant know. Our democracy is being trampled flat by these scum and our governments are screwing every one of us for them.....
What a big pile of sh*t.

728.9.2011 9:05

Originally posted by KillerBug:
When they made seatbelts mandatory, they said they would never pull anyone over for not wearing one...now they have checkpoints!

Never believe anything a police officer tells you, and you should run if someone from the government says the words, "I am here to help you".
They are not all bad. I once thought as you. I am very glad to have befriended my brother in law. He is an ex marine and a cop. And a great guy. I drive without a license and showed him the legality of it and he is much more inclined to show me stuff that is straight up bullshit now since I gave him "the BLUE Pill"

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