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EU to monitor Virgin Media's P2P snooping trial

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 27 Jan 2010 22:09 User comments (7)

EU to monitor Virgin Media's P2P snooping trial The European Commission (EC) has agreed to requests from a human rights watchdog to monitor Virgin Media's planned deep-packet inspection test on its network to determine the level of illegal file sharing. Virgin will use software called CView that will sniff traffic over the Gnutella network, eDonkey network and through BitTorrent and will be capable of retrieving file names.
The system is setup currently so that individual users cannot be identified by CView. However, Privacy International is concerned that using the software will breach UK privacy laws. "Under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (Ripa) intercepting communications is a criminal offence regardless of what you do with the data," Alexander Hanff, head of ethical networks at Privacy International, said.

He has vowed to file a criminal complaint if Virgin starts using CView. Legislation proposed in the UK would use a measured response to fight piracy. It would start with a warning letter to a customer of an ISP (from the ISP once it receives a complaint) and those who persist will get further, stronger warnings before eventually being suspended from the service.

While CView has the ability to identify files being shared illegally, Virgin claims it is will not be used to weed out pirates for warnings or suspension. "It was never designed to capture identities. This isn't an answer for that," said Asam Ahmad.

"We want to understand what we can do to reduce illegal file-sharing. This will tell us things such as the name of the top ten tracks being shared as well as the percentage of legal versus illegal." He admitted that traffic from up to 40 percent of the ISPs users could be scrutinized, and that customers will not be warned in advance. He pointed out that Virgin Media will not be alone in using deep packet inspection, saying that BT already does.

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7 user comments

128.1.2010 5:25
av_verbal
Inactive

as most of you techies probably know, this DPI is useless at fighting piracy as all you need do is put the pirated files into a Zip/Rar file and password lock it.

seems this is monitoring p2p will it identify all spotify content as illegal?

Then you could simply spam the network with fake file names and none infringing content, wait for the letter to drop on your door, then let the BPI (Sony, Warner) take you to court, the potential for vexatious litigation against these corporate scum is very exciting.


why are they monitoring all internet traffic under the guise of piracy is the real worry. with software designed by a subsidiary of corrupt arms manufacturer BAE systems, it stinks more of government spying to me, outsourcing to the private companies as per usual.

DPI will give them the ability to view all your passwords, user names, email, voip conversations, anything that has low encryption or unencrypted, every single click will be monitored.


http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/01/27/filesharing_letter_wrong/

Quote:
Which? warns on pirate letters

ACS:Law sends out letters offering to settle the file-sharing accusation in exchange for £500. The company gets its information from internet service providers.

The scheme was run by lawyers Davenport Lyons but was transferred, along with some staff, to ACS:Law last summer.

Which? said it had been contacted by over 150 people, with even more getting in touch after the last wave of letters.

One letter to Which? said: “My 78 year old father yesterday received a letter from ACS law demanding £500 for a porn file he is alleged to have downloaded. He doesn’t even know what file sharing or bittorrent is so has certainly not done this himself or given anyone else permission to use his computer to do such a thing.”
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 28 Jan 2010 @ 6:14

228.1.2010 6:48

How can snooping into a persons interactions break privacy? Doesn't that seem to be obivous.

"While CView has the ability to identify files being shared illegally, Virgin claims it is will not be used to weed out pirates for warnings or suspension. "It was never designed to capture identities. This isn't an answer for that," said Asam Ahmad."

Sure they will never use the tool for what it is capable of doing, of course not who would think that would happen. LOL

328.1.2010 6:52

dont hold your breath. nothing has happened to BT yet about their illegal intercepts. the gov in the UK is so retarded about anything IT related

428.1.2010 8:47
av_verbal
Inactive

Originally posted by babelfish:
dont hold your breath. nothing has happened to BT yet about their illegal intercepts. the gov in the UK is so retarded about anything IT related
the police were called in & they dropped, the what should have been a criminal case because BT showed no criminal intent, except from breaking the law conducting secret trials & denying this, & it was for their customers benefit, since when was target advertising for "our" benefit?

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/09/22/bt_phorm_police_drop/

Quote:
The matter will not be investigated by the City of London Police as it has been decided that no Criminal Offence has been committed. One of the main reasons for this decision is the lack of Criminal Intent on behalf of BT and Phorm Inc in relation to the tests. It is also believed that there would have been a level of implied consent from BT's customers in relation to the tests, as the aim was to enhance their products.
it smells of government intervention.

the eu are currently examining the secret phorm trials and the UK government are fighting the case at the expense of the tax payer on behalf of BT a huge multinational corporation.

http://news.zdnet.co.uk/security/0,1000000189,39846695,00.htm
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 28 Jan 2010 @ 8:55

528.1.2010 8:50

ima reg member ;)

yeah i know police called in. pity someone hight up is a BT none-exec. nothing happened. i wonder what would happen if i wiretapped that individual? i bet no amount of lack of criminal intent would stop me getting locked up.

as far as i know the EA are issuing the UK with a large fine for allowing this. meaning you and me are paying for BT to steal data.

god i hate this country sometimes!

628.1.2010 17:14

So just so I understand this.. it's NOT illegal to intercept someone else's communications anymore? and it can be done without a court order or even informing someone that they are being intercepted or traced? wow...

729.1.2010 8:30

all they are doing is telling you not to steal the rich mans money while he steals yours

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