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Video Daily: Google to launch ultra fast broadband

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 10 Feb 2010 16:20 User comments (8)

Video Daily: Google to launch ultra fast broadband Google has announced that it will begin building an ultra fast broadband network to service up to 500,000 customers around the United States, with speeds advertised at about 100 times the current average speed for broadband connections.
The company will use fiber optic lines, and the entire network will be an experiment. The experiment is whether it can sell more Web ads, if it encourages citizens to be on the Internet more. Although the move would put the company in direct competition with Verizon, Time Warner, Comcast and others, a move to a standalone broadband business seems unlikely for the search giant.

Google says to: "Imagine sitting in a rural health clinic, streaming three-dimensional medical imaging over the web and discussing a unique condition with a specialist in New York. Or downloading a high-definition, full-length feature film in less than five minutes. Or collaborating with classmates around the world while watching live 3-D video of a university lecture."

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8 user comments

110.2.2010 16:47

Wow this would be crazy speed!!! Seems like these days google is trying to do EVERYTHINGGGGGG.

Whats next google car? lol

210.2.2010 17:41

Originally posted by biglo30:
Wow this would be crazy speed!!! Seems like these days google is trying to do EVERYTHINGGGGGG.

Whats next google car? lol
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bKLOfm4itow&fmt=18

310.2.2010 17:45

Quote:
"Imagine sitting in a rural health clinic, streaming three-dimensional medical imaging over the web and discussing a unique condition with a specialist in New York. Or downloading a high-definition, full-length feature film in less than five minutes. Or collaborating with classmates around the world while watching live 3-D video of a university lecture."
Yeah Right,everybody knows it will be used for faster porn :D

410.2.2010 21:51

I for one welcome our new skyne- google overlords

511.2.2010 6:54

I wonder if this is part of Internet2... More research required...Google already admit that our privacy is (in the boss of Google's opinion) only a problem if we have something to hide.

This part bothers me, Google being in charge of more DNS,

Quote:
In late 2009 Google offered a service called public DNS, which it said would speed up web browsing for users.

The domain name system is a series of databases that translate web addresses into computer readable numbers called IP addresses.

"The average Internet user ends up performing hundreds of DNS lookups each day, and some complex pages require multiple DNS lookups before they start loading," Google wrote in a blog at the time. "This can slow down the browsing experience."

DNS requests are usually handled by a person's Internet Service Provider (ISP).
Free speech websites are already being targeted across the world at the ISP level (don't know who's ordering the blocking of the sites yet), giving a company such as Google access to the home end of the network connection smells a little like putting the wolves in charge of the chicken house :).
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 11 Feb 2010 @ 7:02



Main PC ~ Intel C2Q Q6600 (G0 Stepping)/Gigabyte GA-EP45-DS3/2GB Crucial Ballistix PC2-8500/Zalman CNPS9700/Antec 900/Corsair HX 620W
Network ~ DD-WRT ~ 2node WDS-WPA2/AES ~ Buffalo WHR-G54S. 3node WPA2/AES ~ WRT54GS v6 (inc. WEP BSSID), WRT54G v2, WRT54G2 v1. *** Forum Rules ***

611.2.2010 14:30

Creaky, you've mentioned this a couple of times now... I too, am very interested in this subject. Do you have any links about this DNS blockage of Free Speech sites?

I mean hell, the net had a sh*t fit over the blocking of 4chan, I would think they would be apoplectic over this.

711.2.2010 16:09

Sure, Here and Here and Here

Be prepared for closed-minded people to call you a conspiracy theorist or a (according to the Patriot Act) 'Domestic terrorist' though, for reading non-mainstream articles though :)
At the rate we're going the West will have only state-sponsored news, just like China, a real home from home.
What i will say is that those agencies wasting time banning such sites would only bother banning them if they didn't like what was being said on those sites. If they're (for example) crackpots and kooks they wouldn't need banning...

My point for mentioned this in a Google article is simply that Google have been making a lot of noise lately re China allegedly hacking them. And there's a lot of noise in the news lately (in both mainstream and alternative news) re so-called cyber-terrorism ie we seem to be being geared up for being pushed towards 'internet2' to 'protect us' from so-called cyber-terrorists..

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 11 Feb 2010 @ 16:22



Main PC ~ Intel C2Q Q6600 (G0 Stepping)/Gigabyte GA-EP45-DS3/2GB Crucial Ballistix PC2-8500/Zalman CNPS9700/Antec 900/Corsair HX 620W
Network ~ DD-WRT ~ 2node WDS-WPA2/AES ~ Buffalo WHR-G54S. 3node WPA2/AES ~ WRT54GS v6 (inc. WEP BSSID), WRT54G v2, WRT54G2 v1. *** Forum Rules ***

822.2.2010 11:41

This sounds like smoke and mirrors to me.

Is Google seriously planning on building infrastructure? ie, tearing up roads to bury cable or installing last-mile connections to your house? Really? That seems so out of sorts with what Google's business model is.

When I see stuff like this I tend to believe they're just going to piggyback on existing infrastructure like a lot of broadband "competitors" do, but then there's no way these claims can be real.

I live just 30 miles north of a major metropolitan area and the best DSL I can get is 512k. There is radio Internet available, but it costs $60/mo and it's "1-1.5mbps"...and I'm willing to bet it drops out a lot depending on wind/trees/etc. No cable or anything else in the area.

I have serious doubts Google can rescue me from crappy Internet if even the players with established infrastructure refuse to do it.

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