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Chinese online gaming market to double by 2014

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 02 Apr 2010 18:04 User comments (2)

Chinese online gaming market to double by 2014 Niko Partners, the market research firm, has reported this week that they expect the Chinese video game industry to grow to $9.2 billion USD by 2014, over a double from 2010.
The market was $3.57 billion in 2009, and expected to grow to $4.5 billion this year.

"While the global economic downturn hurt videogame publishers in much of the world, China's online game industry reflected no pain in 2009 and gamers continued to embrace online games as the best inexpensive source of social entertainment available,"
says Lisa Cosmas Hanson, managing partner of Niko Partners. "While the era of online gaming is generating lots of interest and growth opportunity in the West, China is one of the countries where online gaming is a well established market segment that extends its reach to more and more Chinese consumers every year."

Overall, 63 percent of gamers have increased their game playing time in the past year.

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2 user comments

14.4.2010 5:23

China is becoming more affluent, as more Chinese workers get jobs, and have some leisure time. It is inevitable. Many Western companies have moved their manufacturing to China, because it has a very large, work cheap workforce. Workers have lost their jobs in Western Countries to China, and now find it hard to get work.

25.4.2010 0:09

Quote:
Chinese online gaming market to double by 2014 along with their population
Joking aside....

What is really sad is that we live in a world where constant consumption is necessary in order for an economy to survive, regardless of whether or not the consumption/product is necessary. Since we all need money to survive, this results in an expansion of jobs that might not be necessary to produce these unnecessary products/services. On top of that there isn't even enough jobs in the world that is necessary to earn money too survive, even though what is being produced is enough to support life, resulting in those who cannot find work to suffer hardships.

What a dilemma.

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