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Sharp will sell 3D HDTVs in Japan, US, Europe, China

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 12 Apr 2010 14:33 User comments (5)

Sharp will sell 3D HDTVs in Japan, US, Europe, China Sharp has announced today that it will begin selling 3D HDTVs in the U.S., China, Europe and Japan starting this summer, in an effort to play catchup with rivals Sony, Samsung and Panasonic.
The company had originally played down 3D TVs, calling them little more than gimmicks, but with 3D becoming the new trend, they have quickly switched gears.

Japan will get the first displays, starting in July, with the other markets getting them in the Q1 2011.

There was no word on pricing or other details as of yet, but they did say the displays will use Quatron technology, which adds yellow to the standard R'G'B (red, green, blue) to make tons of new vivid colors.

Says Shigeaki Mizushima, group general manager: "Our product shows a far brighter image. The difference is going to be clear to anyone. Brightness is just so easy to understand."

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5 user comments

112.4.2010 16:56
bazjf
Inactive

spam edited by ddp

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 15 Apr 2010 @ 22:27

212.4.2010 20:16

The "3d" portion of 3dTVs still is just a gimmick. Almost nothing exists to actually utilize it (regularly), and won't for quite a long time to come.

312.4.2010 23:53

Sure it's a gimmick...but a profitable one!

I have my doubts about their 4-color system...the input is RGB, so what does yellow do, other than forcing the RGB picture to be converted? It is a bit like those 6-color photo printers that can be beaten by a good 3-color printer...just another gimmick.

414.4.2010 4:27

They have been in Australia for a month or 2 all ready, the samsung one sells around $5000 AUD .

They had a show on about these TVs, you get 4 glasses and you have to wear them all the time even for non-3D TV viewing.

Also the glasses can be heavy to wear for a long time and require their own batteries as well, and they only last for 3-4 hours at a time.

Also watching 3D images screw with your brain so you can only watch these TVs for a few hours at most.

So if your looking to buy a 3D TV its only worth it if your only going to watch 3D movies on it.

515.4.2010 13:13

Originally posted by xtago:
Also watching 3D images screw with your brain so you can only watch these TVs for a few hours at most.
I've noticed that at the movies. I don't think it's as straight forward to pull of as people think. Kind of like if the sounds done right you don't notice it. I think it has something to do with continuously second-guessing or figuring where the focal point is so it all "looks right". I mean, ordinarily, irl you decide on the focal point, rl is all focused as is, wherever you look. With a "2D" movie you focus on the same depth point and the mechanics of shooting an image/film with a camera takes over. But when you have to constantly figure what depth they've decided to place the focal point at, there's something a little unnatural about it. Maybe it's just work and it's tiring. Perhaps it's still a nascent art. Or maybe we have to acclimatise to a new (revitalised?) visual medium... And I haven't even mentioned depth-of-field.

"Whoa, there something coming at me. Damn it, it's blurry. What should I be looking at. There it is... wups, too late..." :/

Quote:
So if your looking to buy a 3D TV its only worth it if your only going to watch 3D movies on it.
I suppose it defiantly does indicate what direction video games will take in the future. What PCs and consoles will be expected to generate as standard. Still everything in a computer game can be in focus so it doesn't matter where you look. Depth-of-field etc. is a total construct with 3d CGI, added to make it look like it's shot with a movie camera.

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