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Via the MPAA: Say hello to the world's most 'notorious markets' for pirated digital goods

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 08 Nov 2010 1:01 User comments (14)

Via the MPAA: Say hello to the world's most 'notorious markets' for pirated digital goods Responding to a request from the Office of the US Trade Representative, the MPAA has posted a list of the most "notorious markets" for pirated digital goods outside of the U.S.
The list includes a number of torrent and warez sites that are well known, as well as file-hosting sites and newsgroups clients.

Bob Pisano, interim CEO and President of the MPAA, submitted the list in response to the Office of the US Trade Representative's request for a list of "notorious markets" outside of the U.S.

Pisano noted that 46 percent of revenue brought in by MPAA-member companies is from overseas.

"MPAA has a strong interest in the health and sustainability of these international markets and appreciates USTR’s interest in identifying notorious markets that threaten legitimate commerce, impair legitimate markets’ viability and curb U.S. competitiveness and hurt our overall economic strength. It is critical that our trading partners protect and enforce intellectual property rights," says Pisano.

Here is the list, via TorrentFreak:


BTjunkie.org – Sweden

This BitTorrent indexer with an Alexa ranking of 385 aggregates content “torrents”, which are executable instructions that initiate the download process. Btjunkie offers nearly 100,000 active torrents that are identified as copyrighted movie or television files. Unique to btjunkie.org is its ability to make available both public and non-public infringing content. With most release groups posting new content to non-public torrent websites, this indexing capability is particularly challenging for rightsholders. The site is currently hosted by Sweden’s NetworkSpiration.

Demonoid.com – Ukraine

Demonoid is a very active, semi-private BitTorrent tracker and website with servers located in the Ukraine. Individuals can view what is available but downloading the torrent metadata requires the user to log in. A review of the accessible content on the site lists nearly 100,000 copyrighted movies and television files. Demonoid’s Alexa ranking is 516 which is extremely high for a semi-private environment

IsoHunt – Canada

This is the most popular BitTorrent site in the world after The Pirate Bay. IsoHunt boasts of having 12.51 million peers and 3,743,581 active torrents and has an Alexa rank of 227. A U.S. Court issued a permanent injunction against IsoHunt after finding that over 90% of the downloads made using IsoHunt’s services related to infringing content and that the defendants were liable for inducing infringement. Yet, its Canadian operator continues to run the site with impunity. The site’s operator has commenced an action in Canada seeking a declaration that its operations do not violate Canadian law. IsoHunt can be found at 208.71.112.30. Its corporate address is IsoHunt Web Technologies, Inc., 820 Broadway West, Vancouver, BC V8Q 4K1.

Kickasstorrents.com – Sweden

This BitTorrent portal has a commercial look and feel that could deceive users into thinking it is legitimate. It has been gaining popularity since 2009. The site is hosted by Sweden’s Dedicated Network, Luxembourg’s Root, and France’s OVH. This infrastructure creates redundancy to defend against successful litigation, raids or other actions that may threaten the service. Its current Alexa ranking is 457 and it appears to offer access to 8.1 million torrent files.

Rutracker.org – Russia

This BitTorrent portal is the clone to Torrents.ru, which was taken down by the Russian criminal authorities. It is an indexing site that serves four million users and it has over one million active torrents. It has a global Alexa ranking of 297 and a shockingly high local ranking – 15. Torrent.ru had its domain name suspended by RU-Center, the nation’s largest registrar and web-host, but for now the site is back up at Rutracker.org and it remains to be seen whether the new domain will be taken down by the authorities. Its IP address is 195.82.146.114 and it is hosted by AvtomatizatsiyaBusiness Consulting.

ThePirateBay.org – Sweden/Netherlands

This BitTorrent portal has servers in both Sweden and the Netherlands. The Pirate Bay (TPB) comprises a BitTorrent tracker and websites which facilitate the exchange of vast amounts of infringing content. The Pirate Bay operators proudly claim that it is the biggest tracker of its kind in the world, with over one million users. Since its establishment in 2004, the website has grown exponentially and is now accessible in some 39 separate languages. It has facilitated the illegal exchange of untold millions of protected copyright works. Rightsholders, their trade associations and collecting societies have made countless complaints about the TPB’s activities. The Pirate Bay contains significant and lucrative third-party advertising, much of it promoting the porn industry and US green cards. Advertising revenue is typically a function of number of unique site visits per day. With more than one million hits per day – the Pirate Bay takes in an estimated $60,000 per month from advertisers in addition to thousands of dollars collected from user “donations.” In May 2006, the Swedish Police executed search warrants at 10 separate locations and seized 17 computer servers and made three arrests, closing down the site for a brief period. Although the site operators were ultimately convicted by a Stockholm court, the site has not been shut down. Only the Italian government has taken such action vis à vis Italy. This site has also sparked numerous civil proceedings.

UseNext.de – Germany/Netherlands.

This Usenet service markets to mainstream P2P users much more heavily and directly than do traditional subscription Usenet services. UseNext claims that over 1.2 million videos are available and proclaims “There is nothing you won’t find here.” High-quality Blu-ray rips of MPAA members’ content can be found on UseNext. UseNext has approximately 200,000 regular users. UseNext provides a free trial period to users and then subscription plans start at approximately $10 USD a month and go up based on the quantity of content users wish to download. It is estimated that UseNext clears around 100,000 EUR a month. UseNext is a German operation with indexing servers in the Netherlands. Its Alexa rank is 5,845 and its German rank is 2,811.


Without giving full explanations, MPAA also specifically notes Megaupload.com, Megavideo.com, RapidShare.com, Webhards, Ba-k.com and Kino.to.

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14 user comments

18.11.2010 1:03

**yawn**

28.11.2010 1:04

I don't even use those anymore, not even to find rare stuff since I just request them.

I enjoy how slow they are.

38.11.2010 1:32

2shared is left out what a moron lol

48.11.2010 3:11

MPAA put's up their hand waiting for the teacher's attention to ask to go the to bathroom. I don't see any difference to this situation.

Yes we know they there too thanks for telling the rest of the world and now their traffic increases and MPAA sit's on their hands expecting a pat on the head.

Has anyone noticed that the pirates are winning and kicking field goals.

58.11.2010 7:30

As far as i see it unless these sites are operated in USA (or breaking their countrys law)then the mpaa is powerless to stop them.nice list btw


custom built gaming pc from early 2010,ps2 with 15 games all original,ps3 500gbs with 5 games all original,yamaha amp and 5.1channel surround sound speakers,46inch sony lcd smart tv.

68.11.2010 8:16

The mpaa I bet is goin to get in legal trouble now for putting RapidShare in their due to the Riaa case with them ended in utter failiure

78.11.2010 21:52

My question is....
Why is it copyright infringement if I download a TV show from one of these sites? It's shown for FREE on TV, and downloading it is no different than recording it on my DVR. That's all I've ever Downloaded in the past, are TV shows i want to see, but missed.

I don't see how they could go after someone, or build a case for downloading something that is free to begin with. Suddenly since it's not on their TV station it has monetary value?



88.11.2010 21:52

Why not sue everyone that has a DVR too then?

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 08 Nov 2010 @ 21:53


99.11.2010 2:44

They forgot about the Chinese government; who use nothing but pirated software. Oh yeah...the MPAA does not care about piracy so long as movies are not involved.



109.11.2010 10:43

"notorious markets"

Interesting but laughably biased description for a place where people share things and do not charge a penny.

Idiots.

119.11.2010 10:45

Speaking of hypocrites.......

Seeing as the MPAA & the RIAA love to go after those 'facilitating' copyright infringement I wonder when they'll start sueing the likes of Sony (what with all the blank media and CD/DVD/Blu-ray burners they make.....for 'data back-up', yeah right)?

A$$holes.

1211.11.2010 0:02

Meh the only one I'd go hard after is usenet, the rest show ties to illicit profit and take im down.


Copyright infringement is nothing more than civil disobedience to a bad set of laws. Lets renegotiate them.

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1311.11.2010 12:13

Originally posted by jookycola:
My question is....
Why is it copyright infringement if I download a TV show from one of these sites? It's shown for FREE on TV, and downloading it is no different than recording it on my DVR. That's all I've ever Downloaded in the past, are TV shows i want to see, but missed.

I don't see how they could go after someone, or build a case for downloading something that is free to begin with. Suddenly since it's not on their TV station it has monetary value?
because if you watch it from the tv they make money

1412.11.2010 18:44

>>because if you watch it from the tv they make money

I think I responded to this earlier... Advertisers usually pay a flat fee to the stations depending on how much air time they want and how many times of day they want the commercial shown (also, prime time slots garner more cash than early morning or even some early afternoon hours). It's a well known fact that even Superbowl commercials are in excess of a couple hundred thousand dollars JUST for airtime; in fact it's now a huge part of the Super Bowl event to comment on the commercials. I would think, once again, that commercial owners wouldn't care WHERE their shows are being watched, but then again I think the concern is for shows that have their commercials ripped out (which is obviously what the "groups" who are releasing these are doing). Personally, I don't want to see ANY commercials but I understand their necessity...I'd watch TV online and do a commercial before, maybe ONE during and one after the show if it would help... But those half hour shows that are limited to like 21 minutes with 9 freakin' minutes of commercials were ridiculous... No wonder Tivo like devices made the rounds... Even the new DVR's can rip commercials out of recorded programs...


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