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AT&T hacker pleads guilty

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 26 Jun 2011 16:32 User comments (6)

AT&T hacker pleads guilty Last June, AT&T confirmed that 114,067 iPad 3G owners had their email information leaked to the Web, with the data being stolen by a group calling themselves Goatse Security.
The group then published the emails, which included prominent politicians, celebrities and even military officials.

Earlier this week, Daniel Spitler pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to gain unauthorized access to computers connected to the Internet and one count of identity theft.

At sentencing, the hacker is facing up to 10 years in prison and $500,000 in fines but will likely see fractions of those maximums.

Adds U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman in a statement:

Computer hackers are exacting an increasing toll on our society, damaging individuals and organizations to gain notoriety for themselves. Hacks have serious implications from the personal devastation of a stolen identity to danger to our national security. In the wake of other recent hacking attacks by loose-knit organizations like Anonymous and LulzSec, Daniel Spitler's guilty plea is a timely reminder of the consequences of treating criminal activity as a competitive sport.


A few of the most notable emails breached were New York Times Co. CEO Janet Robinson, Diane Sawyer of ABC News, film mogul Harvey Weinstein, NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg and White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel.

Goatse Security stole the data through a script on AT&T's website. All they needed to do was insert an ICC-ID as part of the HTTP request and the script returned the email address associated with that device.

Besides Spitler, an Andrew Auernheimer of Arkansas was also arrested and charged but it currently out on bond awaiting trial.

Tags: hacking AT&T iPad
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6 user comments

126.6.2011 16:49

the Blackberry is the most successful business phone to date for a single reason, its secure.



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226.6.2011 17:19

This is actually a testimony FOR NOT allowing the takeover of T Mobile by AT&T to go through. If AT&T cannot secure the privacy of its current customers, what chance do the millions of T Mobile customers stand?

ZERO, under AT&T!

326.6.2011 17:54

"At sentencing, the hacker is facing up to 10 years in prison and $500,000 in fines but will likely see fractions of those maximums."

Err I hope he's not counting on that. With all the Anon, LULSec and other BS lately I wouldn't be suprised if they make him an example and throw the book at him...Not that I agree with that neccesarily...


Just my $0.02,

dEwMe

426.6.2011 18:25
smiler123
Inactive

bad timing

526.6.2011 18:41

Originally posted by dEwMe:
"At sentencing, the hacker is facing up to 10 years in prison and $500,000 in fines but will likely see fractions of those maximums."

Err I hope he's not counting on that. With all the Anon, LULSec and other BS lately I wouldn't be suprised if they make him an example and throw the book at him...Not that I agree with that neccesarily...

He plead though...HOWEVER, given that people in the White House had their emails revealed, I could see some political mandate coming down for a large fine.

My guess is 3-6 months, 5 years probation with limited access to a computer and $25k fine. We shall see September 26th for sentencing.

628.6.2011 16:13

I think the punishment for security breaches should be much tougher since it impacts so many people and the costs can be in the millions. In any case, the consumer needs to be empowered to protect themselves. I dont feel that companies do enough to protect my personal info so I will think twice before providing businesses with any personal info. Everyone needs to be smart about protecting their personal data. I use this free service to send and receive encrypted emails at this sendinc website It ensures my messages are stored and transmitted securely, and that only I and my recipients have the capability to decrypt your message data.

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