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Time Warner to launch UltraViolet tech with 'Green Lantern' release

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 04 Aug 2011 15:48 User comments (11)

Time Warner to launch UltraViolet tech with 'Green Lantern' release Last July, Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem (DECE), a syndicate of technology, cable and entertainment companies introduced their long awaited cloud-based digital locker today, dubbing the service Ultraviolet.
The group is readying Ultraviolet for a fall launch.

When it launches, the service will allow users to stream their music and movies anywhere, as long as it is legally purchased. Content providers will get to use one cloud-based platform to create a set of Web standards for DRM on digital content.

Time Warner will be adding the UltraViolet technology to its movies in time for the holidays, says the company.

Two of its new releases, Horrible Bosses and Green Lantern, will be the launch films for UltraViolet.

Beginning with the releases of Horrible Bosses and Green Lantern in the fourth quarter, the vast majority of our future home video new releases will be UV enabled. The key part of our plan is to drive use of the UltraViolet is Flixster, the preferred system there.

Today, Flixster is one of the most popular applications for finding information about movies, and over the coming months we'll begin to roll out new upgraded versions of the Flixster service, which will be deeply integrated with UltraViolet.


Flixster will allow consumers to watch and manage digital collections, locally or in the cloud.

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11 user comments

14.8.2011 17:44

IMHO, the only possitive thing about this, is that finally we won't be getting any more digital copy's coasters when buying films on DVD and Blu-ray. Other than that, due to compression, deppendancy of an internet connection and online availibility, streaming "on the cloud" services are inferior in all ways to actually having films phisically on disc. Probally good enough if watching films on a portable player, but if you spent thousands of dollars on a large LCD/Plasma screen, BD player and HT system, it would be such a waste to use them primarily for streaming.

34.8.2011 19:18

"*cough* http://xkcd.com/927/ *cough*"

Hahahahahahaha!
Jeff

44.8.2011 20:04

ok i looked at the site and here is their selling points ... PROTECT YOUR COLLECTION...

Physical Damage or Loss

Elena comes home from work to find her entire DVD collection strewn about. What isn’t half-eaten by her 6-month-old puppy is scratched, cracked or missing altogether. Fortunately, Elena has registered her UltraViolet discs in her Household Account, so she can download replacement digital copies of any missing titles, or simply stream them to her computer or other devices.

Technology Meltdowns

One day, Gary wakes up and wants to turn on his computer, but it’s not working – the hard drive is dead! One thing he does NOT have to worry about is his collection of UltraViolet movies and TV shows, which had all been on that hard drive. He knows all his entertainment media can be accessed online via his UltraViolet Account and he can download replacements to his new UltraViolet computer.

Storage Limitations

Many folks find their digital entertainment collection stops growing when they reach the storage capacity of their device’s hard drive. With UltraViolet media, you don’t have to worry about deleting files to free up storage on an UltraViolet device – you can always access your collection via streaming, download the file again if needed, or simply transfer the media from any other UltraViolet device registered in your household.

first issue damage or loss ...i spent 30 bucks for a blu-ray movie and the answer is digital replacement that i already have with itunes or windows. if i wanted just the movie i would bought the dvd for 10-20 bucks. i spent the extra money for the bonus stuff on the blu-ray lets not forget if i bought a physical DVD or blu-ray your still not replacing it its still a controlled media file there is no way to recoded an original retail dvd/blu-ray disc from a digital download

second Technology Meltdowns.. we all have them the solution is a back up hard drive anyone who uses one hard drive for everything is a morehole your computer crashed on you because of all the crap on the c drive that you look at once and keep on it forever its like your butt you never clean it your gonna have lots of crap on it and it wont function the correct way

third Storage Limitations.... its called a second or third or forth or an extra hard drive that is bigger than you have and bigger than you'll need the last thing anyone needs is a new form of tracking what you media view or listen to and why do we need their permission to stream something to other devices in our own home...

all of this is counter productive to what the internet providers are currently doing that is if you use too much bandwidth they cap you,slow you down or charge you more for over usage i can see now all my movies 600 so far all on their cloud type service i want to fill up my 160 GB iPod ??? all that bandwidth used i might get tagged by my service provider ..... good effort but sometime your putting glitter on crap thinking the public wont know its crap

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 04 Aug 2011 @ 20:25

54.8.2011 22:40

The vast majority of the population don't have internet connections capable of streaming a movie in full bluray quality, and they won't let you download ISO files to make new images so it does not protect the bluray you bought...it is just a lower quality backup.

They say, "As long as it was legally purchased"...that would be impossible to do. Either you have to let people upload content from their PCs (potentially pirated), or you would have to limit it to things that had the UltraViolet logo on them when purchased...effectively eliminating everything made up to this point.

I am glad they are starting with Green Lantern...maybe when they only sell five copies they will think that it was because of UltraViolet.



65.8.2011 5:50

What I can't understand is: Why optical?


"You know, it seems that quotes on the internet are becoming less and less reliable." -Abraham Lincoln.

75.8.2011 8:54
Zoo_Look
Inactive

Quote:
and he can download replacements to his new UltraViolet computer
So is this horse-shit gonna be hard coded into computers now?

85.8.2011 16:35

I'm assuming it'll cost extra to register your purchase for UltraViolet, they'll charge you monthly for an account, and charge you to register each device for UltraViolet use.

Quote:
Fortunately, Elena has registered her UltraViolet discs in her Household Account, so she ...
Sounds like you'll need a different account depending on what you want to do. Maybe no mobile streaming on the Household Account (or no streaming at all, just downloading) or something like only registering PCs and Blu-Ray players. It just sounds like it's not as great as they want it to sound.

95.8.2011 16:42
Zoo_Look
Inactive

Let's be honest... It will cost extra to the end user even if they DON'T use the service. I mean, what are the odds they will just bump up the price of your store purchase with no intention of going digital in an effort to offset the cost of setting it up. Pretty slim I would have thought!

105.8.2011 18:29

What's the over/under on how long it will take to crack the Ultraviolet DRM?
3 days?


Oh, Im sorry... Did the middle of my sentence interrupt the beginning of yours?

1116.8.2011 12:27

Originally posted by KillerBug:
They say, "As long as it was legally purchased"...that would be impossible to do. Either you have to let people upload content from their PCs (potentially pirated), or you would have to limit it to things that had the UltraViolet logo on them when purchased...effectively eliminating everything made up to this point.
Yes, how would this work with the 1tb drive I have of all the music I have purchased over the years (physical copies) that has been transferred to my computer? Not that I would ever use anything by TW. Are we going to be required to purchase (DRM) 'rights' for our own personal use now?

"Here is your new (album) and (blu-ray movie). Would you like to purchase some DRM to prove it's yours in case you want to upload it to your cloud?"

Someone told me once that theres a right and wrong, and that punishment would come to those
who dare to cross the line.
But it must not be true for jerk-offs like you.
Maybe it takes longer to catch a total asshole.

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