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Amazon launched HTML 5 Kindle reader, avoids Apple charges

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 10 Aug 2011 18:38 User comments (7)

Amazon launched HTML 5 Kindle reader, avoids Apple charges Amazon builds browser app that will save it from paying a 30 percent cut to Apple.
The new Kindle Cloud Reader is optimized for iPads, while directing customers to Amazon's own eBook store. It will work on PCs, Macs and any mobile devices using Apple Safari or the Chrome web browser.

Since the application is web-based instead of being a "native" iPad application, Amazon can avoid Apple policies that would force it to use Apple's purchasing system, and pay a fee. Direct purchasing links are no longer allowed on native iPad applications.

Despite being a web-based application, the Kindle Cloud Reader looks like a native application. Last month, the Financial Times also switched to a HTML 5 newspaper reader application. "We believe that in many cases, native apps are simply a bridging solution while web technologies catch up," said Stephen Pinches, the FT group product manager of emerging Technologies.

"We expect to see more HTML5 apps and fewer native apps. At the FT we believe our customers are paying for the content rather than the channel, and that a single payment and single subscription which works across multiple devices offers significant benefits to users."

Under Apple's policies, the company would have gotten a 30 percent cut of each e-book sale made through the native Kindle application. With the web application, users can still save books onto the device for offline reading too.

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7 user comments

110.8.2011 18:49

This tactic will only work for so long, until Apple decides to update their policy to close the loop hole. Just wait and see. I think it would be a di#k move on Apple to do this but what do they care? Certainly not about their customers or other content providers.

210.8.2011 19:02

Originally posted by 5fdpfan:
This tactic will only work for so long, until Apple decides to update their policy to close the loop hole. Just wait and see. I think it would be a di#k move on Apple to do this but what do they care? Certainly not about their customers or other content providers.
I dont think thats possible. In order to do that they'd have to try to do the same to anyone selling content on any website that can be opened with the Safari web browser.

310.8.2011 22:18

Quote:

I dont think thats possible. In order to do that they'd have to try to do the same to anyone selling content on any website that can be opened with the Safari web browser.
If they could find a way they would.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 10 Aug 2011 @ 22:19

411.8.2011 8:59

They won't find such way. They should start thinking in lowering much their profit, or everyone will soon follow this Amazon's steps. The 30% cut may be reasonable for app sales (though I find it also quite high), given the market infrastructure they provide. But, for purchasing external services or goods, that's just too much, for not mentioning the word "usure". Just think of an online store whose profit is less than 30%. Such a business will never consider using the Apple Store / Android Markey for B2C sales. Maybe if they think that percentage twice more companies will adopt this method of payment.


"You know, it seems that quotes on the internet are becoming less and less reliable." -Abraham Lincoln.

512.8.2011 14:21

Good move Amazon and many more to follow. Why pay 30% when you can launch the app from the browser?

612.8.2011 18:11

Oh dear poor Apple is only worth $342 billion so they need all the extra money they grab.

713.8.2011 12:24

Originally posted by leglessoz:
Oh dear poor Apple is only worth $342 billion so they need all the extra money they grab.

Well, every cent counts.

And, just for the record, the Android Market follows exactly the same policies as the Apple Store, having even the same 30% cut for installs and app-related purchases. If something works, why change it? The thing is, they'll be able to mantain the 30% for the installs, but not for the purchases. They'll need to lower it very much soon.

"You know, it seems that quotes on the internet are becoming less and less reliable." -Abraham Lincoln.

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