AfterDawn: Tech news

Music publishers give up on YouTube infringement lawsuit

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 18 Aug 2011 10:36 User comments (3)

Music publishers give up on YouTube infringement lawsuit The National Music Publisher's Association (NMPA) has decided to settle a copyright infringement lawsuit against YouTube. Neither the NMPA nor YouTube has released details of the settlement, but based on YouTube's history of fighting such suits to the end and winning, they probably didn't have to offer any concessions.
NMPA represents thousands of music publishers for purposes of royalty collection. Through a subsidiary, the Harry Fox Agency (HFA), they collect mechanical royalties for compositions. These are separate from the royalties collected by other organizations for recordings or performances.

NMPA President and CEO David Israelite called the settlement, “a positive conclusion for all parties and one that recognizes and compensates the work of songwriters and publishers going forward.”

On their official blog, YouTube explained what that means:

Going forward, the 46,000 music publishers already affiliated with HFA will be able to license the musical compositions they represent for use by the YouTube community. When these publishers allow YouTube to run ads alongside user generated videos that incorporate their compositions, the publishers, and the songwriters they represent, can make money. We’ll also be working with HFA to invite other publishers to sign up, even if they’re not affiliated with HFA.


So basically, the publishers gave in and finally decided YouTube's offer is better than nothing, which is what they were likely to get from the lawsuit.

Previous Next  

3 user comments

118.8.2011 11:56

Hooray!

Now can we stop having the stupid restrictions on YouTube videos so much?
Especially ones I want to play on my networked TV etc?

218.8.2011 12:19

Probably not. Most likely it's the labels who are responsible for those restrictions.


Rich Fiscus
@Vurbal on Twitter
AfterDawn Staff Writer

318.8.2011 12:46

Originally posted by vurbal:
Probably not. Most likely it's the labels who are responsible for those restrictions.
RIght. But I'm just glad they didnt shut it all down, as far as music on youtube period. Even though its already so limited

Comments have been disabled for this article.

News archive