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MPAA / RIAA report says they're doing just fine

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 04 Nov 2011 12:50 User comments (5)

MPAA / RIAA report says they're doing just fine As the entertainment industry in the US lobbies for PROTECT-IP, the E-PARASITE Act, ACTA, and numerous other legal measures designed to give them control over technology, they have released a report showing why they don't need any of them.
According to the report from the International Intellectual Property Association, whose members include the MPAA, RIAA, Business Software Alliance, Entertainment Software Association, Association of American Publishers, Independent Film & Television Alliance, and National Music Publishers' Association, copyright industries are doing just fine.

In fact they're doing better than fine. The report boasts about how copyright industries are doing better than the rest of the economy.

On the subject of how poor economic conditions are affecting copyright industries, the report says:

For the entire period 2007-2010, the U.S. core copyright industries, in real terms, grew at a compound annual growth rate of 1.10%. During the same period, the total U.S. copyright industries grew at a compound annual growth rate of 1.47%. By contrast, the U.S. economy?s compound annual growth rate over the period 2007 through 2010 was only 0.05%.

As these data suggest, in 2007-2008, the core copyright industries grew at a rate in excess of 2.0% (and the total copyright industries grew at a rate in excess of 3.0%) while the U.S. economy did not grow at all. Subsequently, in 2008-2009, the copyright industries, like the rest of the economy, declined at an annual rate of 2-3%. Finally, in 2009-2010, the copyright industries experienced real growth of 3.4-4.2% while the U.S. economy grew at just under 3%. For the whole period of 2007-2010, the compound annual growth rate achieved by the U.S. copyright industries significantly exceeded the compound annual growth rate achieved by the U.S. economy as a whole.


If these companies are doing so well, what exactly are they looking for protection from?

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5 user comments

14.11.2011 13:48

Of course they are doing fine. I'm sure they could give a crap about the starving artists they supposedly represent though...


Just my $0.02,

dEwMe

24.11.2011 16:38

It's easy to prosper when the industry has the power to control and rewrite laws governing the ownership of ideas and information.

As a general rule of business, it's never profitable to piss off one's own customers. So to avoid such outrage they've just gone on a worldwide propaganda campaign to try to trick their customers; to make them believe that ideas and information should never fall into the public domain so that a few powerful people can profit indefinitely off the works and talents of those they claim to support, but from whose backs they attempt to tear the clothing while they think no one is looking.


When laws allow unlimited ownership of ideas, it is to a society as iron fusion is to the core of a star.

When verified realities lead us to anger, we must learn to reevaluate our beliefs.

34.11.2011 20:18

You mean they made a profit after crying all those years about being ripped-off millions of dollars by low-down-ruthless-parasitic filesharers?! I thought the music and movie industry was shedding thousands of jobs because their failed efforts to stem the tide of media pirates? But of course they only had a yearly growth of 1.10%. Just think of the growth they would have had if we were all honest. Maybe....hmmmm....My guess is 1000000000000000.10%.

45.11.2011 5:04

The MPAA and RIAA are there to create pirates, not to prevent piracy...anyone who thinks their actions are designed to sell music or help artists obviously hasn't been paying any attention at all.



55.11.2011 12:56

Originally posted by KillerBug:
The MPAA and RIAA are there to create pirates, not to prevent piracy...anyone who thinks their actions are designed to sell music or help artists obviously hasn't been paying any attention at all.
I disagree slightly... Look at it as a yin/yang. Without the artists you have no pirates. I mean, without anything worth stealing (I know, I have an oxi-moronic thing going on, just work with me) the alphabet Nazis couldn't validate their existence, thus their paychecks go away... world economy, blah, blah... you get the idea.

I mean Brad Paisley is actually stupid enough to think that ASCAP gave him a chance in the music industry because he is an American and worthy of an American dream. Saw that in an interview, I'm not that much of a country music fan. Boy is he going to be surprised when he wants his music back one day.

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