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PS Vita selling strongly in Japan

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 21 Dec 2011 3:28 User comments (3)

PS Vita selling strongly in Japan According to the latest figures from Enterbrain, the PS Vita is selling well in Japan.
The highly-anticipated handheld went on sale in the nation on Saturday, and Enterbrain says 321,000 units were sold in its first 48 hours of availability.

Although the sales were high, Sony had allegedly ordered 500,000 initial units, meaning the console is not selling up to internal expectations. Sony had even been rumored to be increasing its initial shipments to 700,000 units.

In comparison (via 1up), the original PSP sold 166,000 units in its first 2 days, and more recently the Nintendo 3DS sold 371,000 units in the same time frame.

Sales may be hindered due to issues experienced by early buyers, with many complaining of a non-responsive screen and freezing during gameplay. Sony has since released a firmware update and apologized.

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3 user comments

121.12.2011 4:31

Sales might also be slow because Sony has waged war on their customers for the last 18 months...or maybe because the thing needs an overpriced proprietary memory card just to save games.

...or maybe, just maybe, people want games? The 3DS had a huge library of games available at launch because it was backwards compatible...the Vita is not backwards compatible so the collection is relatively small.



221.12.2011 9:06

True, Sony's products popularity has worn out for the time being, plus Japanese economy is quite unstable since the recent events.

PS Vita capabilities are promising but online games are on fire these days IMAO.


The man is nothing, the work's everything.

323.12.2011 13:44

The memory card price is not that bad... $20 for 4gb, considering it's Sony's proprietary format.

http://www.gamezone.com/news/sony-offic...rds-accessories

I do not understand why people buy the 3DS to play DS games, but each to his/her own I guess.

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