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Latest Facebook phish attack steals your account, financial information

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 15 Jan 2012 18:52 User comments (10)

Latest Facebook phish attack steals your account, financial information In what has got to be one of the most idiotic attacks I have ever heard of, Kaspersky Lab is reporting today that Facebook users are being phished in an effort to steal their accounts and full credit card details.
The attack begins with a private message, purportedly from "The Facebook Team," that reads "Last Warning: Your Facebook account will be turned off Because someone has reported you. Please do re-confirm your account security by: http://apps-xxxx-xxxxx-user.de.vu."

If you are naive enough to click, you are led to a Web site that first asks for your first and last name, Facebook password, birthday and email address. When you complete that first page, you are then led to a page to fill out financial information.

On that second page, the nice scammers write "We will never ask you for your full credit card number, but we may ask for the first six digits." Despite that kind warning, the next page then asks for full credit card number, four-digit security code, expiration date and your billing address. As a note, the phishing page says the info will only be used to purchase Facebook Credits for games.

Writes Kaspersky Lab: "These scams are just getting more popular and we really recommend not giving out personal information, especially not email, password and credit card information over social medias. It is also recommend[ed] that you contact your security vendor and the social media vendor if you encounter these sites."

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10 user comments

116.1.2012 10:44

This is why I don't have Facebook, Twitter, My space, or any other social silliness. Although you would have to be pretty foolish to fall for this.

216.1.2012 11:17

It really is bothersome how the level of common sense has just about made it on the endangered species list..

Here's a hint for the 'sense-icly impaired'... if you didn't need your credit information to sign up, chances are they don't "ever" need it.


316.1.2012 11:49

Originally posted by LordRuss:
It really is bothersome how the level of common sense has just about made it on the endangered species list..

Here's a hint for the 'sense-icly impaired'... if you didn't need your credit information to sign up, chances are they don't "ever" need it.
Hopefully these dumb-asses can't/won't procreate.
Jeff

416.1.2012 12:51

Originally posted by Jeffrey_P:
Hopefully these dumb-asses can't/won't procreate.
Jeff
Yet it pains me to say, "the dumbest guys on the planet have the biggest dorks..."

Not my words gentlemen. Someone much wiser than I spoke of this truism long ago. I've been working with folks in laboratories from all over for injections of Alzheimers into the penis for quite some time, but research is slow. Trust me, these egg heads want it just as bad as the rest of us do.

516.1.2012 23:02

Originally posted by LordRuss:
It really is bothersome how the level of common sense has just about made it on the endangered species list..

Here's a hint for the 'sense-icly impaired'... if you didn't need your credit information to sign up, chances are they don't "ever" need it.
As the saying goes "Common sense is anything but common" Too many people fall for these scams. Scammers go to great lenghts to make the emails and messages look like they are actually coming from Facebook or some bank or other organization that could have financial and personal data. If people actually took the time to examine the message before they blindly clicked they would see the obvious tricks but most see the logo and react off of panic and this is what the scammers are hoping for. The days of the virus and worms to get data are gone and now it is all social engineering attacks which affect everyone no matter what system they use.

"Have you tried turning it off and on again?" ~ Roy Trenneman

http://www.facebook.com/BlueLightningTechnicalServices

616.1.2012 23:22

people need to smarten up and stop falling for scams.


custom built gaming pc from early 2010,ps2 with 15 games all original,ps3 500gbs with 5 games all original,yamaha amp and 5.1channel surround sound speakers,46inch sony lcd smart tv.

717.1.2012 12:19

Anyone falling for this deserves a 'tough love' lesson.

Tech savvy or not.......this is like giving the key to your house to a stranger...........you just don't!

Personally, I wouldn't feel an ounce of remorse for anyone duped.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 17 Jan 2012 @ 12:20

817.1.2012 12:26

Originally posted by hearme0:
Anyone falling for this deserves a 'tough love' lesson.

Tech savvy or not.......this is like giving the key to your house to a stranger...........you just don't!

Personally, I wouldn't feel an ounce of remorse for anyone duped.

If more people thought of it that way then maybe they would not be so eager to click or submit such information. Unfortunately many people think that they are safe and secure behind a computer which is maybe why cyber-bullying is so popular. Most people post stuff on the internet that they would never say or do in real life.

I also have no remorse and have no problem telling the person why this happened to them and why they cannot blame their identity theft, infection, or money loss on the computer and have no one to blame but themselves.


"Have you tried turning it off and on again?" ~ Roy Trenneman

http://www.facebook.com/BlueLightningTechnicalServices

917.1.2012 12:36

You know, the only way I could see pity or remorse for any of these folks is if the con men had an ingenious plot/plan that took weeks for the scam to take place. Something that would damn near be celebrated. Kind of on the verge of being of having you brag, "I was one of the individuals that got took for $xxx in that con job" kind of scam.

I mean you wouldn't even call it a scam it would be that good. Hollywood would be making movies about it & not even take your money, it would be that good. That kind of con. Sure, the perpetrators would have to go to jail, but even the televised courtroom trial would be like a sitcom & everyone would be happy about it.

That's what we need. That's when 'these' folks would get my empathy.

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 17 Jan 2012 @ 12:38

1018.1.2012 10:52

Originally posted by bobiroc:
Originally posted by hearme0:
Anyone falling for this deserves a 'tough love' lesson.

Tech savvy or not.......this is like giving the key to your house to a stranger...........you just don't!

Personally, I wouldn't feel an ounce of remorse for anyone duped.

If more people thought of it that way then maybe they would not be so eager to click or submit such information. Unfortunately many people think that they are safe and secure behind a computer which is maybe why cyber-bullying is so popular. Most people post stuff on the internet that they would never say or do in real life.

I also have no remorse and have no problem telling the person why this happened to them and why they cannot blame their identity theft, infection, or money loss on the computer and have no one to blame but themselves.



In the words of Madea..........Halleluyer!!

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