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European Court of Justice to examine ACTA

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 22 Feb 2012 9:58 User comments (5)

European Court of Justice to examine ACTA ECJ to examine whether ACTA conflicts with fundamental rights in the European Union.
European Commissioner for Trade, Karel De Gucht, announced on Wednesday that the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) has been referred to the European Court of Justice (ECJ).

The European Commission has already passed ACTA and the European Council adopted ACTA unanimously in December. The trade agreement has also been passed to the European Parliament for a debate and vote to be held later. However, the trade commissioner is looking to the ECJ to independently clarify the legality of this agreement.

The court will assess whether ACTA is incompatible with the EU's fundamental rights and freedoms, such as freedom of expression and information or data protection and the right to property in case of intellectual property.

The ratification process for ACTA has sparked debate in EU nations about the freedom of the Internet, and the importance of protecting Europe's Intellectual Property for member states' economies.

"I share people's concern for these fundamental freedoms. I welcome that people have voiced their concerns so actively ? especially over the freedom of the internet. And I also understand that there is uncertainty on what ACTA will really mean for these key issues at the end of the day.

So I believe that putting ACTA before the European Court of Justice is a needed step. This debate must be based upon facts and not upon the misinformation or rumour that has dominated social media sites and blogs in recent weeks."

European Commissioner for Trade, Karel De Gucht.

The commissioner said that ACTA will not change anything in the European Union, as the standards of enforcement of intellectual property rights mandated by ACTA are already met by laws in the EU. Rather, the aim for European nations is to see it adopted by other countries so that European companies can defend themselves against blatant rip-offs of their products and works.

Tags: ACTA
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5 user comments

122.2.2012 11:43

Misinformation or Rumor? Typical comment from an asshole who would sell out his own freedom & the freedom of his countrymen in the hopes of saving his own ass. Pure act of cowardice, no doubt about it.

For an individual who made it a point to stand on people's universal right to vote, he certainly doesn't seem to share the sentiments here. Karel De Gucht is nothing more than America's Chris Dodd, a paid advocate by big business to protect their assets at whatever the costs. He's just collecting a paycheck.

I see this as nothing different here but a change geographic local.


222.2.2012 14:40
llongtheD
Inactive

Well it's just comforting to see the U.S. leading the way on this one. I guess if we call a restrictive law a treaty, and sign it outside the country, it makes everything alright. Democracy at its finest.


If your fish seems sick, put it back in the water.

323.2.2012 3:11

Originally posted by llongtheD:
Well it's just comforting to see the U.S. leading the way on this one. I guess if we call a restrictive law a treaty, and sign it outside the country, it makes everything alright. Democracy at its finest.
It's not laws though, it's a treaty 2 different things.

A treaty doesn't over rule the local laws.

But to have a free trade agreement with the USA you need to also sign up to this agreement as well, it allows US companies the ability to protect their products.

What you probably don't know the USA probably have to sign the same thing or another treaty from the Eu or any other country so it works both ways.

Most European countries have a set limit on the amount of US made movies that can be released in their countries some have a limit of less than 30 movies can be released so that country will only have the biggest blockbusters and nothing else, that's not just releases in movies that also DVDs etc.

A lot of the US movie companies don't like these laws and would like these countries to get rid of them.

ACTA won't get rid of those laws though.


It would seem to me that many US people don't understand what ACTA actually is and assume it's the exact same thing as PIPA etc which again are different laws but only for the US market.

424.2.2012 6:50
llongtheD
Inactive

Originally posted by xtago:
Originally posted by llongtheD:
Well it's just comforting to see the U.S. leading the way on this one. I guess if we call a restrictive law a treaty, and sign it outside the country, it makes everything alright. Democracy at its finest.
It's not laws though, it's a treaty 2 different things.

A treaty doesn't over rule the local laws.

But to have a free trade agreement with the USA you need to also sign up to this agreement as well, it allows US companies the ability to protect their products.

What you probably don't know the USA probably have to sign the same thing or another treaty from the Eu or any other country so it works both ways.

Most European countries have a set limit on the amount of US made movies that can be released in their countries some have a limit of less than 30 movies can be released so that country will only have the biggest blockbusters and nothing else, that's not just releases in movies that also DVDs etc.

A lot of the US movie companies don't like these laws and would like these countries to get rid of them.

ACTA won't get rid of those laws though.


It would seem to me that many US people don't understand what ACTA actually is and assume it's the exact same thing as PIPA etc which again are different laws but only for the US market.

That's a pretty optimistic view. If you read my post I never said a treaty was a law or vice versa.
SOPA or PIPA hasn't been passed here yet either, yet you'd never know it by the way they're taking down websites.

524.2.2012 9:45

This has nothing to do with Democracy, actually quite the opposite. Chrony Capitalism, yes... Corruption in our system, yes.... But Democracy, Freedom, and representing us as a whole, no!

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