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ISPs: Blocking The Pirate Bay is not effective

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 16 Jul 2012 14:06 User comments (9)

ISPs: Blocking The Pirate Bay is not effective 60 days into the Netherland's and UK's 'experiment' in forcing ISPs to block The Pirate Bay, one ISP says the tactic is completely ineffective in controlling traffic to and from P2P and torrent sites.
Major Dutch ISP XS4All told TF that torrent traffic actually increased after the block.

UPC in the Netherlands says there was only a small temporary blip down before traffic returned to normal.

Another two ISPs, KPN and Ziggo, say volume is exactly where it was before the ban.

In response to the reports, the British Recorded Music Industry (BPI) says they are not dissuaded and will "take further steps to deal with illegal sites that line their pockets by ripping off everyone who makes the music we enjoy."

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9 user comments

116.7.2012 14:24

"take further steps to deal with illegal sites that line their pockets by ripping off everyone who makes the music we enjoy.".....Oh really, looks like more pissing in the wind to me!


"Do not underestimate the power of an enemy, no matter how great or small, to rise against you another day." - Atilla

216.7.2012 14:35
ecfu1
Unverified new user

"take further steps to deal with illegal sites that line their pockets by ripping off everyone who makes the music we enjoy."

Only WE [The BPI] can line our pockets by ripping off everyone who makes the music we enjoy.

416.7.2012 14:52

..............

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

516.7.2012 15:05

Idiots.

They're so blinded in their lunatic schemes to try to monitise every download everywhere for anything that they can't even see - and care even less - that the net result of their efforts is an internet that is becoming a great hiding place for terrorists, paedos & criminals.

Proxies etc have appeared and become known thanks to the efforts of the 'entertainment industry' (only already one of the most profitable businesses on the planet).

Well done guys, you must be so proud.

618.7.2012 12:40

The tighter you make your grip, the more that slip through your fingers...


720.7.2012 18:27

Originally posted by Semperfipal:
"take further steps to deal with illegal sites that line their pockets by ripping off everyone who makes the music we enjoy.".....Oh really, looks like more pissing in the wind to me!
1) No one is getting rich on illegal down loads
2) You are only right is lawyers make the music because they are the one that take the biggest piece of the pie, the poor artist doesn't get much. They do better donating their music and hope for donations.
3) Why in the hell does an idea that usually gets written in a night merit 100 years of royalties while a patent that takes years to create and a minimum of ten thousands dollars to develop is only good for 17 years. Answer the lawyers pay the law makers to change the law 10s of millions investment get 10s of billions in return. Moles like you must love to lick their asses as they crap on you!

820.7.2012 18:48

Originally posted by Mez:
Originally posted by Semperfipal:
"take further steps to deal with illegal sites that line their pockets by ripping off everyone who makes the music we enjoy.".....Oh really, looks like more pissing in the wind to me!
1) No one is getting rich on illegal down loads
2) You are only right is lawyers make the music because they are the one that take the biggest piece of the pie, the poor artist doesn't get much. They do better donating their music and hope for donations.
3) Why in the hell does an idea that usually gets written in a night merit 100 years of royalties while a patent that takes years to create and a minimum of ten thousands dollars to develop is only good for 17 years. Answer the lawyers pay the law makers to change the law 10s of millions investment get 10s of billions in return. Moles like you must love to lick their asses as they crap on you!

Mez: I agree with your post, but last sentence "Moles like you must love to lick their asses as they crap on you!"....I assume your not directing that at me?.........Also, not sure if your old enough to remember, but when I was a younger man I remember listening to a rock radio station and the host would announce a certain song he liked and tell the audience "Turn on your tape recorders because your gonna wanna play this over and over" What the hell is the difference between recoding a song or music on a reel to reel tape recorder verses downloading it from a source in the internet?

"Do not underestimate the power of an enemy, no matter how great or small, to rise against you another day." - Atilla

920.7.2012 20:46

Well I got carried away. Sorry!

It isn't even that I download myself anymore. Mainly because there is so little new music I can afford to buy it. I do buy it because what I like is not all that popular so the artist can use what little they get. Not because I think downloading is evil. I downloaded a great deal of very old vinyl captures that are so rare I couldn't buy them if I wanted to. Back then they paid for a tune outright maybe a few grand if they couldn't buy it for less. The tune paid for its self a hundred times over by 1950. If they sold an mp3 it would still be a dollar. I know 2 artist who claim the music industry stole their work and sold their recording under the name of another artist. They assumed the artist would never find out.

The same is the industry was completely against both.

The difference is The radio (AM) is only about 45-50 bit rate about like YouTube while a download can be lossless and most is as good or better than a commercial mp3. With the recordings they were copies for personal use they were not shared because they were pretty crappy. Often the adds were recorded as well. The court had an easy decision for tapes. Because the downloader usually uploads as well the industry claims they are distributing. I do not believe that has ever been proved in a court of law. You can sue a person in the US for having ice on his walk as long as their is a perceived damage.

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