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Mozilla employees want brand new CEO Brendan Eich to resign, already

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 30 Mar 2014 14:38 User comments (7)

Mozilla employees want brand new CEO Brendan Eich to resign, already Mozilla's brand new CEO Brendan Eich, hired earlier this month, has already seen employees publicly demand his resignation.
Eich, who is one of the creators of the JavaScript language, donated money to California's Prop 8 (a proposal to ban gay marriage) in 2008, and protests over his anti-gay views have been increasing, especially since his promotion.

Several prominent employees have already called for the CEO's ouster, and three Mozilla board members stepped down this week, as well. Former CEOs Gary Kovacs and John Lilly, along with Shmoop CEO Ellen Siminoff, have all stepped down. The board members stepped down because they had been looking to bring in an outside CEO with better experience in mobile. This did not happen. Mozilla says one of the board members had decided to leave at the end of the CEO search no matter who was selected, and the other had plans to leave since January.

Mozilla has been trying to expand into mobile but the road has been slow and not fruitful to date.

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7 user comments

130.3.2014 19:04

I just want them to stop with the ridiculous "rapid release" version numbers. In just a few years, we went from v3 to v28 for Firefox, sometimes with as little as a month between version numbers, and it comes across as saying, "Yeah, the previous version was crap, so use this newer version" over and over, which implies some inherent instability or sloppiness on their part.

230.3.2014 23:21

Chrome does essentially the same thing, but quieter.

It really is amazing that the CEO of a company headquartered just outside of san francisco (probably the most tolerant city on earth) wouldn't realize that he is alienating everyone and a simple statement saying he has changed his mind in the past 6 years is all he needs.



331.3.2014 14:35

Originally posted by KillerBug:
It really is amazing that the CEO of a company headquartered just outside of san francisco (probably the most tolerant city on earth) wouldn't realize that he is alienating everyone and a simple statement saying he has changed his mind in the past 6 years is all he needs.
I'm not making any kind of statement on his personal beliefs. Isn't he entitled to them? Why should he have to change his views on morality just because he has a new job? I can see where it might open him up to discrimination charges but he has every right to believe what he does. When will the tolerant Nazis realize they should be tolerant of those whose beliefs differ from theirs?

Just my $0.02,

dEwMe

431.3.2014 18:19

Originally posted by dEwMe:
Originally posted by KillerBug:
It really is amazing that the CEO of a company headquartered just outside of san francisco (probably the most tolerant city on earth) wouldn't realize that he is alienating everyone and a simple statement saying he has changed his mind in the past 6 years is all he needs.
I'm not making any kind of statement on his personal beliefs. Isn't he entitled to them? Why should he have to change his views on morality just because he has a new job? I can see where it might open him up to discrimination charges but he has every right to believe what he does. When will the tolerant Nazis realize they should be tolerant of those whose beliefs differ from theirs?
I'm not saying he cannot have his personal views, just that by making them public he opens himself up to a lot of crap that he could easily avoid. Heck, he could just say, "I regret donating to support prop 8 like I did" and leave it at that...it is true; he probably regrets doing it so publicly ("like I did"). Don Quixote was opposed to windmills...he went around the countryside fighting them to no avail...it gained him nothing, and future generations laugh at such a quest. Throughout the ages the windmills have come in different forms...and those who fight them publicly are lucky if they go down in history as only being comical.


531.3.2014 18:55

Originally posted by KillerBug:
I'm not saying he cannot have his personal views, just that by making them public he opens himself up to a lot of crap that he could easily avoid.

By exactly the same logic, it could be argued that those on the opposite side of the issue should avoid publicizing their views. The fact that simply having a public belief opens up a person to being stripped of their livelihood demonstrates that society is plenty intolerant. It's just intolerant of the opposite things it was intolerant of 50 years ago.

631.3.2014 19:29

Originally posted by nonoitall:
Originally posted by KillerBug:
I'm not saying he cannot have his personal views, just that by making them public he opens himself up to a lot of crap that he could easily avoid.

By exactly the same logic, it could be argued that those on the opposite side of the issue should avoid publicizing their views. The fact that simply having a public belief opens up a person to being stripped of their livelihood demonstrates that society is plenty intolerant. It's just intolerant of the opposite things it was intolerant of 50 years ago.
Yes, by that same logic people have been hiding their support of equal rights for decades, and even today. IF you are a bishop in the catholic church you don't support equal rights (not even for women in the workplace)...no matter what your personal views.


71.4.2014 23:49

I think we're getting a little off track here. My point is that tolerance is a two-edged sword. It doesn't just mean that other people must respect us and our right to believe what we want, but also that we must respect them and their right to believe what they want. The first part is easy to live with. The second part, as this outburst is demonstrating, is difficult to get the hang of.


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