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Kantar: Android with 62 percent of U.S. smartphone market share

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 06 Jul 2014 23:36 User comments (10)

Kantar: Android with 62 percent of U.S. smartphone market share According to the latest data from Kantar Worldpanel, Android continues to gain market share in the U.S., pulling away from iOS significantly as of the end of May 2014.
Android now has a dominant 61.9 percent of the U.S. market, ahead of Apple at 32.5 percent. The new level is a low for Apple, reaching a number not seen since before the iPhone 4s' launch in 2011.

Windows Phone continued its extremely slow growth, and now controls 3.8 percent of the market. BlackBerry has almost completely played itself out of the market, now at 1.3 percent. All other operating systems accounted for 0.6 percent share.

Outside of the U.S., Android's share is much higher, averaging over 85 percent in places like China, Brazil and Mexico, and over 75 percent in Italy and France. The only place in which iOS still has the lead is Japan, where Android controls 47 percent share of the nation.

Source:
Kantar

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10 user comments

17.7.2014 1:23

I would really like to see what would happen if Apple did a 180 and opened up there business practice. Things like let others open legal app stores, not charge for 3rd party accessories, and allow other hardware manufactures make and sell their phones.

27.7.2014 17:05

Originally posted by lamain:
I would really like to see what would happen if Apple did a 180 and opened up there business practice. Things like let others open legal app stores, not charge for 3rd party accessories, and allow other hardware manufactures make and sell their phones.
They learned their lesson back in early '90s when they did that with Mac. "Never again" was the result of that experiment.

Yes, Apple's iPhone will probably drop into similar market share Mac has among desktop & laptop users globally, but then again, they still reap majority of the profits in the market. (Mac global marketshare of the global desktop computers, for example, was around 4%)

Market share or the revenue aren't really that important. Profits and whether the profits are growing or shrinking, that is the key question behind each and every company.

37.7.2014 18:32

Quote:
They learned their lesson back in early '90s when they did that with Mac. "Never again" was the result of that experiment.
As Apple computers are and as far as I know always have been open to accessories and 3rd part stores I am assuming you are saying that they let others manufacturer apple computers? Is this correct? How long did this last if so?

Quote:
Yes, Apple's iPhone will probably drop into similar market share Mac has among desktop & laptop users globally, but then again, they still reap majority of the profits in the market. (Mac global marketshare of the global desktop computers, for example, was around 4%)
If they do not change I agree this seems like a likely outcome.

Quote:
Market share or the revenue aren't really that important. Profits and whether the profits are growing or shrinking, that is the key question behind each and every company.
This is the reason that I feared Apples massive popularity. Their devices while very impressive steps forward came with a business model that if followed by others would have been in my opinion catastrophic. Apple was and is still making so much money why wouldn't every company follow suit? It is fine if people still have companies to choice from but look at Microsoft with their Windows 8 RT. It looks like consumers are making a choice and RT will not become the norm but would you blame Microsoft for trying to mimic Apple?

For me the only way a consumer can vote on this is by not buying from a company that uses the business model. I think this is why Apple is dropping in share.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 07 Jul 2014 @ 18:34

48.7.2014 7:22

Originally posted by lamain:
Quote:
They learned their lesson back in early '90s when they did that with Mac. "Never again" was the result of that experiment.
As Apple computers are and as far as I know always have been open to accessories and 3rd part stores I am assuming you are saying that they let others manufacturer apple computers? Is this correct? How long did this last if so?
Precisely, Apple licensed their hardware and software to other manufacturers to try to build a similar ecosystem the Wintel had became. More info:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh_...h_clone_program

Quote:
Quote:
Market share or the revenue aren't really that important. Profits and whether the profits are growing or shrinking, that is the key question behind each and every company.
This is the reason that I feared Apples massive popularity. Their devices while very impressive steps forward came with a business model that if followed by others would have been in my opinion catastrophic. Apple was and is still making so much money why wouldn't every company follow suit? It is fine if people still have companies to choice from but look at Microsoft with their Windows 8 RT. It looks like consumers are making a choice and RT will not become the norm but would you blame Microsoft for trying to mimic Apple?

For me the only way a consumer can vote on this is by not buying from a company that uses the business model. I think this is why Apple is dropping in share.
I think the Apple's strategy on focusing on high-margin products only is quite winning formula in the end. Sure, it will mean that neither OS X or iOS will ever become the dominant operating system, but it ensures that the company stays afloat when Chinese manufacturers start their inevitable price attack on mid-to-high-end phone segment (which, to some degree, has already begun with Huawei and upcoming OnePlus One).

Apple's strategy is to sell the "whole package" with certain brand promise that others cannot replicate -- and then demand pretty hefty price for it. And as we can see from computer and phone market, the strategy works pretty well :-)

510.7.2014 11:27

Are we gonna get monthly percentage updates. This "news" is getting boring. Apple makes their own phones, while android phones are made by a dozen different companies at cheaper prices. Of course android will have greater market share.

610.7.2014 18:09

***Yawwwwwwwwn***

713.7.2014 5:04

Originally posted by mightyzog:
Are we gonna get monthly percentage updates. This "news" is getting boring. Apple makes their own phones, while android phones are made by a dozen different companies at cheaper prices. Of course android will have greater market share.
There's no "of course" about it. iOS is losing ground to Android... simple as that. It doesn't matter if iOS devices are made by one company or a hundred. I understand that you're getting at apple still being a big company.

Maybe it's because Android's cheaper but if it was up to Apple far fewer people would have this tech. They would want it to remain elitist. No wonder Jobs got so upset.

Its a lot easier being righteous than right.


DSE VZ300-
Zilog Z80 CPU, 32KB RAM (16K+16K cartridge), video processor 6847, 2KB video RAM, 16 colours (text mode), 5.25" FDD

813.7.2014 7:59

Originally posted by Jemborg:
Originally posted by mightyzog:
Are we gonna get monthly percentage updates. This "news" is getting boring. Apple makes their own phones, while android phones are made by a dozen different companies at cheaper prices. Of course android will have greater market share.
There's no "of course" about it. iOS is losing ground to Android... simple as that. It doesn't matter if iOS devices are made by one company or a hundred. I understand that you're getting at apple still being a big company.

Maybe it's because Android's cheaper but if it was up to Apple far fewer people would have this tech. They would want it to remain elitist. No wonder Jobs got so upset.

I think that you are misinterpreting my comment. I was not complaining about apple as a company, I was ridiculing the whole percentage "reporting". I have an iPhone 5, and believe me, I am no elitist.

I was merely commenting that if you walk into a best buy or equivalent and you have 1 iPhone or 15 cheaper android phones to choose from then most people are going to choose the cheaper version. There is no way one company could overcome those odds.

The only reason I went with an iPhone was because I have had iPods and iPod touches in the past and have converted movies to watch. So an iPhone was a no brainer.

913.7.2014 22:20

You can only watch your converted movies on Apple iOS devices?


Its a lot easier being righteous than right.


DSE VZ300-
Zilog Z80 CPU, 32KB RAM (16K+16K cartridge), video processor 6847, 2KB video RAM, 16 colours (text mode), 5.25" FDD

1014.7.2014 1:18

Originally posted by dRD:
Originally posted by lamain:
Quote:
They learned their lesson back in early '90s when they did that with Mac. "Never again" was the result of that experiment.
As Apple computers are and as far as I know always have been open to accessories and 3rd part stores I am assuming you are saying that they let others manufacturer apple computers? Is this correct? How long did this last if so?
Precisely, Apple licensed their hardware and software to other manufacturers to try to build a similar ecosystem the Wintel had became. More info:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh_...h_clone_program

Quote:
Quote:
Market share or the revenue aren't really that important. Profits and whether the profits are growing or shrinking, that is the key question behind each and every company.
This is the reason that I feared Apples massive popularity. Their devices while very impressive steps forward came with a business model that if followed by others would have been in my opinion catastrophic. Apple was and is still making so much money why wouldn't every company follow suit? It is fine if people still have companies to choice from but look at Microsoft with their Windows 8 RT. It looks like consumers are making a choice and RT will not become the norm but would you blame Microsoft for trying to mimic Apple?

For me the only way a consumer can vote on this is by not buying from a company that uses the business model. I think this is why Apple is dropping in share.
I think the Apple's strategy on focusing on high-margin products only is quite winning formula in the end. Sure, it will mean that neither OS X or iOS will ever become the dominant operating system, but it ensures that the company stays afloat when Chinese manufacturers start their inevitable price attack on mid-to-high-end phone segment (which, to some degree, has already begun with Huawei and upcoming OnePlus One).

Apple's strategy is to sell the "whole package" with certain brand promise that others cannot replicate -- and then demand pretty hefty price for it. And as we can see from computer and phone market, the strategy works pretty well :-)
Spoken like a true fan boi. The problem with a cult, is when its leader dies, it fades away as well.
Well, the cult leader died. The cult is copying others. The cult is fading at ever increasing rates.

Since it is becoming increasingly apparent that istuff can't provide a complete package, do you still expect istuff to reverse course drastically and gain share or bottom out at sustainability/

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