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Google no longer makes Google+ registration mandatory for new accounts

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 21 Sep 2014 11:46 User comments (4)

Google no longer makes Google+ registration mandatory for new accounts Google has listened to the people and made Google+ registration no longer mandatory for new accounts.
If you are signing up for a new Gmail, Google Drive, Google Docs account, you will now have the ability to say "No Thanks" to creating a Google+ account. Previously, you had to create a social networking profile whether or not you wanted one.

The latest move follows Google's decision in July to no longer force users to use their real names in Google+. Additionally, reports have Google spinning off Google+ Photos into its own standalone service.

While no one ever really used the service, especially compared to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and other social networks, Google+ did have its place in the market and was popular among some. Back in April, longtime Google+ chief Vic Gundotra left the company, and since then it appears that the search giant is looking to phase out the product.

Source:
Verge

Tags: Google+
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4 user comments

121.9.2014 22:31

As if I was ever anything but "Bozobub Clownlord" to Google+, anyhow, just as I am to Facebook xD. My real name is NOT their business, much less that of the internet at large.

221.9.2014 23:01

Quote:
My real name is NOT their business, much less that of the internet at large.
Smartest security that is.

322.9.2014 15:48

But what about YouTube?

I can't see them phasing this out, simply because they integrated it into so many of their products and also into search, where that's the only advantage to having a Google+ profile. It's otherwise a dead social network.

422.9.2014 22:21

Well, as a more unified cross-platform comment system, the skeletal remains of Google+ can be useful to Google for a long time. It gives them FAR more control over comments from several sources, and also simplifies changes/updates to that framework.

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