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AT&T 'unlimited' plan owners will now get throttled after 22GB of data used

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 16 Sep 2015 13:58 User comments (10)

AT&T 'unlimited' plan owners will now get throttled after 22GB of data used AT&T, staring down a potential $100 million FCC fine, has changed their policy on throttling 'unlimited' data plan owners.
Back when the first iPhone launched, AT&T was selling unlimited data packages as a perk and there are still millions of customers on the grandfathered package, which should in theory offer completely unlimited data whether you use 100 MB or 100 GB.

Unfortunately for AT&T unlimited users, the last few years have seen their data throttled after 5GB no matter what, even though AT&T's own policy stated that throttling would only occur in times of network congestion.

The new policy allows up to 22GB of data per month, uninterrupted, afterwards which AT&T can throttle if there is network congestion. This follows in the new net neutrality rules that allow for "reasonable network management" although AT&T is likely only making the move because the FCC has proposed a $100 million fine for the carrier's abusive throttling for unlimited data subscribers.

Source:
AT&T

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10 user comments

116.9.2015 16:30

It is a shame that AT&T has so little regard for its customers.

It is an even greater shame that sheeple are so foolish as to continue giving their business to AT&T.

I abandoned AT&T (both DSL and wireless) years ago when they started throttling wifi and imposing bandwidth caps on their DSL service (which was also the slowest around). I moved to Verizon for wifi, and my coverage improved radically. I moved to Cox for cable internet, and my connection speed improved from AT&T's measley 5 Mbps (max) to over 100 Mbps on Cox, at a CHEAPER price.

Perhaps there are some who have no other options. But if someone has an option and yet stays with AT&T, they have only themselves to blame.

216.9.2015 16:37

Dayum..I'd blow through 22 gig in an hour!


:/

317.9.2015 1:59

I suffered AT&T Internet for 1 year-on the new subscriber rate, along with U-verse TV. What tore it with me is their charging extra for "renting" their gateway---the same gateway that delivers the U-verse TV- without the "rental" fee.

It was good while it lasted, I am still awaiting an answer as to their rational for this rental fee. Of course, that answer will never come.

Back with Cox, all is well.

417.9.2015 4:10

If this were a desktop internet service, I'd throw a fit but since it's a mobile phone service, I can understand a little.

You really should switch to a desktop if you're downloading 22 Gb via cell phone.

517.9.2015 5:47

Originally posted by ivymike:
If this were a desktop internet service, I'd throw a fit but since it's a mobile phone service, I can understand a little.

You really should switch to a desktop if you're downloading 22 Gb via cell phone.
come on man..YouTube videos add up pretty soon.

:/

617.9.2015 10:34

Originally posted by NHS2008:
Dayum..I'd blow through 22 gig in an hour!
Then you should consider dropping the phone and getting a girlfriend mate!

717.9.2015 13:57

Pretty common knowledge that after the last few iPhones came out, they were changing everyone's TOS off of those plans, with good reason too, considering all of that bandwidth. Now I dislike the price gouging over a GB of data here and there, but 22gb is pretty freaking generous!

817.9.2015 14:13

2

Originally posted by SProdigy:
Pretty common knowledge that after the last few iPhones came out, they were changing everyone's TOS off of those plans, with good reason too, considering all of that bandwidth. Now I dislike the price gouging over a GB of data here and there, but 22gb is pretty freaking generous!
"Generous" means doing more than is required. And if someone is paying for "unlimited" data, then throttling after 22 GB is not more than required.

918.9.2015 7:59

Originally posted by SoTired:
2
Originally posted by SProdigy:
Pretty common knowledge that after the last few iPhones came out, they were changing everyone's TOS off of those plans, with good reason too, considering all of that bandwidth. Now I dislike the price gouging over a GB of data here and there, but 22gb is pretty freaking generous!
"Generous" means doing more than is required. And if someone is paying for "unlimited" data, then throttling after 22 GB is not more than required.
if they are going to limit the data usage witch in my opinion they should.they should switch it from unlimited to limited and make it clear that their is a cap to their consumers .otherwise unlimited should mean unlimited. 22 gigs on a smart phone is unreasonable in my opinion.get a computer for that kind of data usage.

1018.9.2015 20:14

Originally posted by supersaiyaman:
Originally posted by SoTired:
2
Originally posted by SProdigy:
Pretty common knowledge that after the last few iPhones came out, they were changing everyone's TOS off of those plans, with good reason too, considering all of that bandwidth. Now I dislike the price gouging over a GB of data here and there, but 22gb is pretty freaking generous!
"Generous" means doing more than is required. And if someone is paying for "unlimited" data, then throttling after 22 GB is not more than required.
if they are going to limit the data usage witch in my opinion they should.they should switch it from unlimited to limited and make it clear that their is a cap to their consumers .otherwise unlimited should mean unlimited. 22 gigs on a smart phone is unreasonable in my opinion.get a computer for that kind of data usage.
I agree they should be clear and honest about what they are doing. Calling something "unlimited" but then throttling arbitrarily is not clear and honest.

I would not necessarily agree that 22 gigs is unreasonable. I don't use anything close to that, ever. However, these plans are not limited to smartphones. Many tablets and hybrid PCs are now coming with LTE connectivity, or you can connect to a wireless network by tethering to your phone. That's a valid use, and it can use a lot of bandwidth. There is demand for it. If AT&T does not want to service that demand, they are free to cap or throttle, but they need to stop calling their service "unlimited."

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