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Mozilla's new technology boosts speed up to 700%

Written by Matti Vähäkainu (Google+) @ 06 Sep 2016 12:42 User comments (3)

Mozilla's new technology boosts speed up to 700% Mozilla started testing its new Electrolysis architecture last month and the first results are in and appear very promising. Even though the sample size is rather small the Firefox 48 users that very in the trial have reported improvements in speed of several hundreds of percents.
Mozilla reports that improvement can be from 400 to even as high as 700 percents compared to previous versions. Thanks to Electrolysis architecture the browser rarely stops responding and thanks to divided attention to the interface and the actual content it performs faster.

At this point the architecture is being tested in only 1 percent of Firefox users but the testing will expand over coming updates and versions. Mozilla plans to divide the content process to multiple processes and run them in sandbox, which is allowed by many of its competitors.

This means that one tab or process crashing would also not bring down the entire browser. You can read more about multi-process Firefox here.

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3 user comments

16.9.2016 17:12

...can't wait for the Android version.


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213.9.2016 11:38

If you have many tabs open (100+), this has the potential, at least, to completely hose your RAM and CPU. Interesting discussion with Moonchild (head dev of Pale Moon, a Mozilla fork) here.

That said, the Australis UI made FF unusable for me a good long while ago ^^' ...

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 13 Sep 2016 @ 11:40

313.9.2016 23:24

Originally posted by Bozobub:
If you have many tabs open (100+), this has the potential, at least, to completely hose your RAM and CPU. Interesting discussion with Moonchild (head dev of Pale Moon, a Mozilla fork) here.

That said, the Australis UI made FF unusable for me a good long while ago ^^' ...
It actually does have some theoretical potential. Chrome does basically the same thing and the fact that only one page crashes at a time is probably the single best feature of Chrome (especially as it seems to come in handy very often on Chrome). It would also be nice if websites didn't have that momentary freeze while loading content you don't care about...one website I go to frequently always freezes for about 1 second while loading some images from a third party server, if this tech actually works then that won't happen...of course, I'm not sure it will actually help, as typically such poor designs are also tied into formatting, so if you try to click something while it is still loading you end up clicking something else.


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