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Chapters and Bitrate

Now we move on to extracting chapters from our DVD files and deciding on a bitrate for encoding our video. Chapter extraction is necessary both for authoring a BDMV compilation later and making sure the video is encoded with keyframes in the right places so a Blu-ray player can seek directly to those points.


Open the Chapter Creator from the Tools menu.




1. Load IFO


You will need to load the IFO file which goes along with the video from your DVD. If you're not sure what VTS number your VOBs had (ie VTS_XX), this may take some trial and error. You will know you have the right titleset when a list of chapters appears.


3. Save as QPF and Text

Before saving your chapter file, you should uncheck the 'and close' checkbox because you will be saving it twice. The first time you will select the QPF file type. The second, choose TXT instead. Then you can close the Chapter Creator tool.




Calculating Bitrate




Next we can look at setting a bitrate for encoding. Actually there are two different encoding modes we can choose from, quality based and bitrate based. If you need your video to be a particular size you will need to use bitrate based encoding, but quality based encoding will generally give you better results.


Before you can decide on a bitrate, you will need to know how much space you have. We'll use a standard DVD-5 disc as an example. First off, I start by figuring a DVD-5 is 4400MB. That gives me some margin for error.




Next I have to subtract the subtitles I've converted to Blu-ray (Sony BDN XML) format. To do that, I'll simply right-click on the folder they are in and select Properties. The Properties window will tell me the size of the folder, which will also be the size of all the subtitles.




If you use this method, make sure to look at the actual size, not the Size on Disk.




Calculating available space


So I started with 4400MB. I subtract 26MB for subtitles (rounding up to the nearest MB), no overhead for the BDMV files because my disc won't have menus, and I come up with 4374MB.



Next I look at the time, which was loaded automatically from my AviSynth script. You can also enter this value manually. For example, when I encode TV series DVDs I have to add up the running time of all episodes to get an accurate number. You can also click on the clock to change the number into pure seconds instead of Hours: Minutes: Seconds format.


Also, make sure the Codec and Container are set correctly to x264 and M2TS respectively. Finally you can figure in audio files. Click the Add button to add more audio streams. Then you can either load each one or just specify the bitrate manually.




Once all that is done and you click Apply, MeGUI will automatically apply the selected bitrate to your video encoding job. If x264 was set to encode in quality mode instead of bitrate mode, you will be asked if you want to switch.




Table of Contents

  1. 1. Introduction
  2. 2. Create AviSynth script
  3. 3. Chapters and Bitrate
  4. 4. Encoder Settings
Written by: Rich Fiscus