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TI demonstrates lamp-free 1080p DLP projector

Written by Rich Fiscus (Google+) @ 18 Jun 2008 22:45 User comments (11)

TI demonstrates lamp-free 1080p DLP projector LCD may be the hot thing in HDTVs and projectors, but that hasn't stopped Texas Instruments (TI) from continuing to work on DLP. At the Infocomm 08 trade show in Las Vegas they showed off a 1080p DLP projector that replaces the traditional lamp with Phlatlight LED technology. Phlatlight LEDs have already been used for miniature DLP projecters, as well as both DLP and LCD HDTVs.
The projector uses Texas Instruments' new BrilliantColor chipset. They're reporting up to 30% less power consumption compared to units with lamps thanks to the LED technology from Luminus.

"DLP Products has a proven legacy of "firsts" in the market and the projectors being demonstrated this year are examples of that commitment to innovation and commitment to our customers," said Lars Yoder, vice president and business manager, TI's DLP Front Projection Business Unit. "DLP Products is proud to enable our customers, who are the leading projector manufacturers globally, to be the best."

According to a press release the first consumer models are expected to ship from "multiple DLP customers" later this year, although the only company named so far has been Optoma.

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11 user comments

118.6.2008 23:10

The cost of replacement bulbs was the main factor stopping many people from buying a projector, its definitely a step in the right direction but guaranteed your gonna be paying a lot more upfront for it.

219.6.2008 0:46

Originally posted by canuckerz:
The cost of replacement bulbs was the main factor stopping many people from buying a projector, its definitely a step in the right direction but guaranteed your gonna be paying a lot more upfront for it.
Not just up front, LEDs don't last forever, so how much will they cost to replace?

319.6.2008 1:15
susieqbbb
Inactive

great but i think most likely you will be paying more for it.

Which sucks it really wasn't the lamp being the issue it was consumers dont have 1,000 for the projector this had led to many projectors the torpedo projector system for one

419.6.2008 3:23

Quote:
Originally posted by canuckerz:
The cost of replacement bulbs was the main factor stopping many people from buying a projector, its definitely a step in the right direction but guaranteed your gonna be paying a lot more upfront for it.
Not just up front, LEDs don't last forever, so how much will they cost to replace?

Have you read up on LED technology? Chances are by the time the LEDs should die, then the cost should have dropped dramatically to start with, and with the advancements in technology it would probably be about time to upgrade to a new model anyways considering LEDs are estimated to last about 4 years and thats being left on 24/7..
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 19 Jun 2008 @ 3:25

519.6.2008 4:31
nobrainer
Inactive

Originally posted by canuckerz:
The cost of replacement bulbs was the main factor stopping many people from buying a projector, its definitely a step in the right direction but guaranteed your gonna be paying a lot more upfront for it.
completely agree this is a great advancement and worth the outlay. or is laser projectors nearer retail shelves?

This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 19 Jun 2008 @ 4:33

619.6.2008 7:30

Glad to hear there won't be lamps soon. They are very expensive to replace. My school had many projectors, and when the older ones started to have their lamps give out, they would just toss them away. If the LED's can last longer it would incline me to buy one, but it also depends on the cost of replacing those LED's.

719.6.2008 13:41

Originally posted by canuckerz:
The cost of replacement bulbs was the main factor stopping many people from buying a projector, its definitely a step in the right direction but guaranteed your gonna be paying a lot more upfront for it.
I disagree. While the lamp may be a major factor for a handful of potential projector owners, I think the biggest reasons are more to do with two other issues. I believe most people are not buying projectors right now because of ignorance to the technology due to marketing and the massive popularity of LCD/Plasma "flat screen" televisions. Of course this is ridiculous, because you can also hang a projector and it doesn't take up any wall-space. The second major factor is that they require a dark room for optimal viewing. I think that is something a lot of people either don't want to have to deal with or they actually want to be able to watch it in a day-lit room. That's something I can completely understand. Projectors aren't for everyone and the room-darkening is a hidden cost for them. I spent $350 for a single blackout shade for a large window in my projector room and that was the CHEAPEST one I could find! The hard core couch-potatoes of today want to be able to watch their precious TVs all day long while performing any variety of tasks, some of which require light.

819.6.2008 13:54

Quote:
Originally posted by CNDLG:

Not just up front, LEDs don't last forever, so how much will they cost to replace?
No, Xplorer4, I completely agreed with CNDLG here until my fears were allayed after reading these two articles:

http://www.electronichouse.com/article/p...f_illumination/

http://www.engadgethd.com/2008/06/05/lum...-gets-detailed/
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 19 Jun 2008 @ 13:56

919.6.2008 15:18

Quote:
Originally posted by CNDLG:

Not just up front, LEDs don't last forever, so how much will they cost to replace?
No, Xplorer4, I completely agreed with CNDLG here until my fears were allayed after reading these two articles:

http://www.electronichouse.com/article/p...f_illumination/

http://www.engadgethd.com/2008/06/05/lum...ote]
Why are you so concerned about a 60000 to 100000 hour life? That is 6.85 years if you literally leave it on non stop. That's as much as any regular lcd tv. By the time the led's go dead you likely would have thrown it out or given it away because its out dated.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 19 Jun 2008 @ 15:19

1019.6.2008 21:33

I work in electronics manufacturing. I've seen lots of old, returned, equipment with dead components, but I've NEVER seen an LED that's died under "normal conditions"! ...Never!!!

Most LEDs are "permanently" soldered in place... Most incandescent and fluorescent bulbs are plugged-in or screwed-into sockets for easy replacement. You can burn-out an LED if you run too much current through it... (I'm pretty sure you can kill a "regular" LED by hooking it up to a 9V battery without a current-limiting resistor.)

I'll admit I don't know anything about high-power LEDs, and they probably do have a more-finite life than regular indicator LEDs. I've seen LED traffic-light LEDs that appear to have burned-out segments... These might be burned-out LEDs, or it might be the LED driver circuit that's died...

1119.6.2008 21:55

Ummm, I'm not concerned, that's why I said my fears were allayed.

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