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PC demand remains unstable around the globe

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 13 Jul 2014 13:13 User comments (8)

PC demand remains unstable around the globe Even though demand for PCs has picked up after nearly four years of declines, industry watchers remain skeptical that the industry has anywhere to go but down.
The industry temporarily got a boost this year as corporations and governments used the end of life for Windows XP as an excuse to purchase new Windows 7 or Windows 8 PCs, but a few companies have already claimed that that boost is coming to an end, and soon.

Most concerns come from the emerging markets including China, where demand is already falling again. The industry has been averaging at least 3 percent declines year-over-year since 2010 but saw flat shipments for the quarter ended June 30th.

Other concerns are due to PC's main rivals, tablets and now Chromebooks, the former of which has been seeing triple-digit growth (up until this quarter) and the latter of which remains a very popular item, at least within certain niches. The most recent quarter, in which tablet shipments actually fell, does show there is still demand for notebooks, as long as they are cheap and portable but how long that lasts is also unclear, especially if tablets keep moving towards convertible options that basically turns them into laptops.

Source:
Reuters

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8 user comments

114.7.2014 5:03

Which is why I'm pissed off they are only shifting to ddr4 as system RAM on new mobos instead of straight to ddr5.... trying to stretch out a market that can't be stretched out. :/


Its a lot easier being righteous than right.


DSE VZ300-
Zilog Z80 CPU, 32KB RAM (16K+16K cartridge), video processor 6847, 2KB video RAM, 16 colours (text mode), 5.25" FDD

214.7.2014 16:21

It's no wonder, when smartphones and tablets can go anywhere for what can, sometimes, be a fraction of the cost.

PCs haven't seen any major hardware changes in a long time. There was a period of time where LCD screens were new and sleak, and multi-core processors, plus a dip in the price of RAM and hard drives helped spike the business.

With the changes, performance got fast overnight, but they also got rid of how you can identify with that performance. What exactly is a Core iWhatever and why should I buy it over what I have now?

314.7.2014 19:35

4 years just happens to be a timeframe in which many many PCs become outdated and people are NEEDING an upgrade.

As for explaining why the market DIDN'T GO STRAIGHT TO DDR5................................well, those that honestly can't see why RAM makers didn't go that route are hopeless goofs and should NEVER EVER EVER go into business for themselves as they will inadvertently screw others and themselves without even knowing it because of their brutal lack of understanding as to how a business operates.

415.7.2014 1:21

Originally posted by hearme0:
4 years just happens to be a timeframe in which many many PCs become outdated and people are NEEDING an upgrade.

As for explaining why the market DIDN'T GO STRAIGHT TO DDR5................................well, those that honestly can't see why RAM makers didn't go that route are hopeless goofs and should NEVER EVER EVER go into business for themselves as they will inadvertently screw others and themselves without even knowing it because of their brutal lack of understanding as to how a business operates.
I understand well enough why they didn't go straight to DDR5 and those that can't see that prove time and time again they are hopeless wankers and shouldn't go into business etc etc...

:P

Its a lot easier being righteous than right.


DSE VZ300-
Zilog Z80 CPU, 32KB RAM (16K+16K cartridge), video processor 6847, 2KB video RAM, 16 colours (text mode), 5.25" FDD

515.7.2014 4:44

If you put Mainboard,CPU and Memory purchases on that chart the bars would be on the up and high.

Most companies nowadays don't buy PC's out right anymore, they have there IT department consolidate what can be upgraded and what needs scrapped.

the issue here is a PC case made in the last 10 years can be gutted its mainboard replaced and put back into service faster than IBM or whoever can deliver new ones.


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615.7.2014 5:23

Originally posted by Jemborg:
Which is why I'm pissed off they are only shifting to ddr4 as system RAM on new mobos instead of straight to ddr5.... trying to stretch out a market that can't be stretched out. :/
a processor that could processes and allocate lets say 4-8 threads at a the same time from the same program could theoretically take advantage of the DDR4/5.

Alternatively a processor with a high throughput like 128 bit or 256 bit could easily take advantage of such memory.

until programs use more than two threads efficiently, or 128bit processors become the norm. the chance of ever tapping out the max potential DDR4/5 is slim to nonexistent.

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715.7.2014 12:48

Originally posted by DXR88:
If you put Mainboard,CPU and Memory purchases on that chart the bars would be on the up and high.

Most companies nowadays don't buy PC's out right anymore, they have there IT department consolidate what can be upgraded and what needs scrapped.

the issue here is a PC case made in the last 10 years can be gutted its mainboard replaced and put back into service faster than IBM or whoever can deliver new ones.
My previous job was doing the exact opposite. They felt the need to get rid of our MS Windows Enterprise license and buy machines direct from HP. That was an awful idea, especially in an industrial environment. Waste of money, but stuff was "under warranty." Right... why even employ an IT department then if you want awful third party support and spotty warranty coverage!

816.7.2014 0:08

Originally posted by DXR88:
Originally posted by Jemborg:
Which is why I'm pissed off they are only shifting to ddr4 as system RAM on new mobos instead of straight to ddr5.... trying to stretch out a market that can't be stretched out. :/
a processor that could processes and allocate lets say 4-8 threads at a the same time from the same program could theoretically take advantage of the DDR4/5.

Alternatively a processor with a high throughput like 128 bit or 256 bit could easily take advantage of such memory.

until programs use more than two threads efficiently, or 128bit processors become the norm. the chance of ever tapping out the max potential DDR4/5 is slim to nonexistent.
With respect, I'm not so certain of that Dex. Especially with the new generations of APUs and suchlike coming on the market. Yours is the first time I've ever heard of system RAM outclassing the cpu etc. But I'll take your view on board and look into it more when I have time.

Besides, for various reasons, I believe that it would be better for the industry to tool up for DDR5 system modules now, not later.



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This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 16 Jul 2014 @ 0:25

Its a lot easier being righteous than right.


DSE VZ300-
Zilog Z80 CPU, 32KB RAM (16K+16K cartridge), video processor 6847, 2KB video RAM, 16 colours (text mode), 5.25" FDD

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