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Seagate reveals 10TB Barracuda HDD

Written by Andre Yoskowitz (Google+) @ 20 Jul 2016 11:02 User comments (9)

Seagate reveals 10TB Barracuda HDD It's likely overkill for 99 percent of PC owners, but Seagate has revealed a new 10TB Barracuda Pro HDD this week, giving users a massive amount of storage for their computing needs.
The drive is standard 3.5-inch, 7200RPM so it won't offer too much in terms of features besides capacity, but it is still interesting to see how far we have come.

"The Barracuda family has a rich history of delivering reliable drives at an affordable price point for our customers, who are struggling to keep up with the vast amounts of data they're creating and consuming," said Merle McIntosh, SVP Sales and Marketing, Newegg. "Seagate is pushing the boundaries on capacity and a cost-effective 10TB option is a product our customers will appreciate."

Unfortunately, that "cost-effective" drive will set you back $500, which is certainly less cost-effective than getting two 8TB drives from Seagate for $250 each.

Source:
Seagate

Tags: hdd Seagate
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9 user comments

120.7.2016 11:32

I miss the days of loading up games from my Atari cassette player!

We thought we were in heaven when we finally had 40MB HDD's and Colorado 120 tape drives. Even though the 40MB drive was about $500 at the time. ROFL

Wonder where we'll be 10-20 years from today?? Hope I'm still around to see it!

220.7.2016 12:20

Originally posted by skeil909:
I miss the days of loading up games from my Atari cassette player!

We thought we were in heaven when we finally had 40MB HDD's and Colorado 120 tape drives. Even though the 40MB drive was about $500 at the time. ROFL

Wonder where we'll be 10-20 years from today?? Hope I'm still around to see it!
Yes, I remember not so long ago getting 64GB HDDs and thinking that would last forever. Insane.

320.7.2016 20:57

I still remember my 210MB hard drive, trimming wallpapers and screensavers and unused DLL's out of Windows 95 so I could fit two or three games on the computer at once. When it died and I had an excuse to upgrade to a 2GB model (made by Maxtor, now owned by Seagate)...I was in heaven! Now I have 17TB of external drives sitting at a friend's house as an offsite backup, plus many GB of documents synced with Mega...heck, my phone has a 128GB MIcroSD card in it.

That doesn't change the fact that I want a 5D crystal burner...more is still better! I'm so glad that hard drive companies are past their flood induced stagnation/price fixing stage and are actually making bigger drives and lowering the price on the smaller ones.

420.7.2016 22:13

Just imagine losing 10 terabytes of data, sheesh.

520.7.2016 22:29

Originally posted by ivymike:
Just imagine losing 10 terabytes of data, sheesh.
It really isn't any different than losing 10GB of data...in fact the most valuable data is often very small, while drives like this tend to either get filled with ripped movies or (once the price comes down) get thrown into redundant RAID arrays for servers. Personally I go with offsite backups...RAID is nice for preventing loss from a dead drive, but there is still fire, power spikes, etc...only what I am working on at the current time is on RAID arrays, as it is hard to keep that backed up remotely when my internet isn't fiber.

622.7.2016 14:25

Originally posted by KillerBug:
Originally posted by ivymike:
Just imagine losing 10 terabytes of data, sheesh.
It really isn't any different than losing 10GB of data...in fact the most valuable data is often very small, while drives like this tend to either get filled with ripped movies or (once the price comes down) get thrown into redundant RAID arrays for servers. Personally I go with offsite backups...RAID is nice for preventing loss from a dead drive, but there is still fire, power spikes, etc...only what I am working on at the current time is on RAID arrays, as it is hard to keep that backed up remotely when my internet isn't fiber.

It's WAY different. As a network engineer, I regularly span data across multiple partitions to alleviate a single solitary loss.

722.7.2016 19:34

Originally posted by hearme0:
Originally posted by KillerBug:
Originally posted by ivymike:
Just imagine losing 10 terabytes of data, sheesh.
It really isn't any different than losing 10GB of data...in fact the most valuable data is often very small, while drives like this tend to either get filled with ripped movies or (once the price comes down) get thrown into redundant RAID arrays for servers. Personally I go with offsite backups...RAID is nice for preventing loss from a dead drive, but there is still fire, power spikes, etc...only what I am working on at the current time is on RAID arrays, as it is hard to keep that backed up remotely when my internet isn't fiber.

It's WAY different. As a network engineer, I regularly span data across multiple partitions to alleviate a single solitary loss.


Losing one drive of an array made up of 10GB drives is different from losing one drive of an array made up of 10TB drives??? Other than rebuild time, how so?

826.7.2016 22:12

Got a 382mb hard drive here 200mm (8")long,140mm (5 1/2") wide,70mm (2-3/4")deep & weighs approx 6kg it's a NEC 1989,it's pretty much the size of two internal pc dvd drives stuck togeather.Couldn't find any pictures to post however what i did find is even bigger again,a vintage IBM the size of a small suit case,i suggest wearing safety boot before viewing if you're so inclined,tech sure has come a frak'n long way

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBjoWMA5d84


927.7.2016 22:06

I still remember finding "bigfoot" drives in ordinary PC's on a somewhat regular basis for a while, some of those double height 3.5" hard drives too...and I have an old IBM collecting dust that has a hard drive as part of an ISA card...I think it is a whole 20MB, and it is almost as long as my GTX970. Of course that old IBM "portable" has two 5.25" floppy drives as well.

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