AfterDawn: Tech news

OGG Vorbis goes 1.0!

Written by Lasse Penttinen @ 11 Jul 2002 14:10 User comments (3)

OGG Vorbis, the potential MP3-killer, has just made the 1.0 version milestone. The CVS source code is now at 1.0 state, while the official release and specifications will be published in the next few days. In case you didn’t know, OGG is a free, un-restricted, un-patented audio compression format. It provides excellent sound quality with similar or lower bitrates than MP3.

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3 user comments

112.7.2002 5:39

Oh! OH !!!!! I've been crawling all over the Project Mayhem's forum threads, and boys oh boys, right from the Xiph CEO'S (Emmett Plant's)mouth himself , he's saying tasty things like, "Get out your black suits. It's time to have a funeral for Real, WMA and mp3pro." And I was just bugging him *yesterday* about when 1.0 was coming. (The bugger was non-committal even *yesterday* and wouldn't promise anything - and here he *knew* All Along!) OMG - I is so's excited I is. !!! I have over 50 music cds already encoded and burned just since we last discussed the subject, Lasse, but I can see I'll have to hold off encoding any more for a bit until I can snag the official release later on this week. THANKS for the Update! (As always, we seem to hear/see things HERE first! -- An Itchy Klingon -- P.S. I WANT STANDALONE HARDWARE SUPPORT !!

212.7.2002 15:40

I've tested the final release and it has quite an improvement over the previous RC3 release. There is a noticeable difference especially at low bit rates such as 64kbps. Although it seems to capture roughly the same amount of the source as MP3Pro; both at 64kbps, there are fewer artefacts such as ‘twinkling’ and ‘watery’ sounds compared to the MP3Pro format. With OGG at 80kbps, the quality sounds to me somewhere in between a FGH encoded 128kbps MP3 and a Lame encoded 128kbps MP3. Another big feature of OGG is the ability to encode up to a 32bit source with up to 255 channels. This makes it suitable for future applications such as adding high fidelity 5.1 sound to an open source video codec such as VP3 or DivX. MP3Pro can only encode a 16bit source, up to 96kbps bit rate and uses intensity stereo to emulate stereo out of a single channel. Another big feature of OGG is the ability to encode up to a 32bit source with up to 255 channels. This makes it suitable for future applications such as adding high fidelity 5.1 sound to the open source VP3 video format. MP3Pro can only encode a 16bit source and uses intensity stereo to emulate stereo out of a single channel. According to a post from CDFreaks.com, the final vorbis releases can be obtained from: http://audio.ciara.us/rarewares/

312.7.2002 18:31

Hi! I know very little of the technical stuff (I'll have to leave that to the Pros), but I made a couple of test oggs a few days ago with a pre-release ('daily binary') from Mike Smith - v0.95 (libvorbis rc4; -- I had been using v0.9 rc3), and I found my files to be approx. 10% smaller than before using the same -q setting. (And they still sound awesome!) Of course, since cdrs are cheap, I'm using a very high level (-q 7.5). I'll check out your link, seanbyrne, thank you. -- A slighty-less-itchy-than-last-night Klingon --

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