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Nano HDTV could change your outlook on HD

Written by Dave Horvath @ 02 Jun 2006 6:24 User comments (16)

Nano HDTV could change your outlook on HD Syscan Imaging, Inc., the world leader in USB imaging scanners and developer for HDTV technology solutions with it's daughter company, Sysview Technology has unveiled their next advancement in the world of high-definition. Through the use of their proprietary carbon nano-tube designs, they have produced a true 1080p display on a screen that only measures 0.7 inches.
The 1080P Nano-LCOS microdisplay imager delivers 1080p x 1920 resolution on a screen about the size of your fingernail. With true 2 million pixel images that amount to a lower developing cost for the company, this type of technology could very quickly make its benefit known to the consumers. With lower production costs, companies are able to sell their HDTV sets at a lower price, thus driving up sales numbers and getting more of the world to move towards the natural HDTV evolution. With television standards set to move away from analog signals to HDTV completely in the next few years, this is a great leap forward in technology.

Chairman and CEO of Sysview Technology, Darwin Hu said, "We are extremely proud to be announcing Nanodisplay's great success in creating a truly unique and proprietary LCOS imager." Co-founder of Nanodisplay, Inc., Dr. Gehong Kim added, "We at Nanodisplay are very pleased with the advancements we have made, including a low-noise advanced architecture, low imager operating temperature and high component production yield. We're looking forward to substantive improvements in what OEM customers can expect from LCOS hi-def technology."

No word yet as to when this technology will make its way into our current line of HDTV displays. It appears the idea of owning an HDTV for a great deal of people who thought the technology was out of their financial grasp, may have gotten a bit easier to fathom.

Source:
Yahoo

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16 user comments

12.6.2006 6:45
gogochar
Inactive

Quote:
they have produced a true 1080p display on a screen that only measures 0.7 inches.
WTF! What is up with that??? What kind of oxymoron is that? WILL NOT BUY! Jesus, HDTV is supposed to help our eyes, not strain them on phone-sized screens!

22.6.2006 7:50

Even phone screens are quite a bit bigger than .7". Gotta wonder if this display might be aimed at 3-D virtual reality type applications. One little HD display for each eye with the proper lensing to make the display fill the majority of each eye's field of view. With hollywood making big noises about 3-D being the next big thing it would be a natural. It's obvious that direct viewing is not what these are intended for.

32.6.2006 8:15

its just to prove that they can do it, and it can be any size bigger than that, for use in phones and other things like say maybe psp2?

42.6.2006 8:20

Quote:
WTF! What is up with that??? What kind of oxymoron is that? WILL NOT BUY! Jesus, HDTV is supposed to help our eyes, not strain them on phone-sized screens
gogochar, you really missed the point didn't you. 1.They are not going to sell this screen 2.It was just to prove it could be done 3.This is really really good, cheap HDTV woooo

52.6.2006 10:10

1080p on a screen that measures .7 inches! Just think what kind of resolution you could get in 42, 50, and 65! If nothing else, think about how much it willd drive HDTV set prices down! It'll take 2 years, but its still good news. Even recent innovations can affect currect market prices. Bring on technology!

62.6.2006 10:27

You guys are kidding right? The .7 inch screen they developed is a LCOS imager. That means it is a chip used for projection TVs (may it be rear or front). So while the chip is .7 inches, the projection TVs they develop with it can be huge. Can you just imagine a front projector with that kind of resolution? And with all their talk about affordability, it can truly be the catalyst of something special.

72.6.2006 11:46

w-yo Thanks for clarifying that. LCOS = Liquid Crystal on Silicon. Ahhhhhh.... Now it makes sense. Too many acronyms to keep track of.

82.6.2006 17:44
gogochar
Inactive

lcarbutt, I didn't read the whole article, just the first paragraph. I know, shame on me. But anyways, I finally did read the article and still have the same relative feelings. If they ever did make this, I still won't buy! What a waste of technology!

92.6.2006 21:56

"its just to prove that they can do it, and it can be any size bigger than that, for use in phones and other things like say maybe psp2?"- That was my interpretation as well. It's actually rather impressive and anything that would make HDTV more affordable is fine by me.

103.6.2006 1:34

Well thanxs for the clarifications that its not for sale yet.

Quote:
size of your fingernail
Crazy stuff is happening in Technology these days.
This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 03 Jun 2006 @ 1:37

113.6.2006 16:39

even if its cheaper to make an its HDTV an so on those companies will milk your pocket for it even if costs are low for them how much you wanna bet your still gonna see expensive prices.....i see these major companies like oil campanies some times see how much people will pay for it then mark it down...well jsut my opinion but lets see where they go with this

123.6.2006 18:48

Now everyone just imaging (drum roll) a High Definition iPod Video!!! Now I would definetely buy one of those.

134.6.2006 7:00

"even if its cheaper to make an its HDTV an so on those companies will milk your pocket for it even if costs are low for them how much you wanna bet your still gonna see expensive prices"- That's why you can always count on generic nobody companies to make a product with just the same quality at a rediculously lower price.

149.6.2006 23:40
Moglex
Inactive

I wouldn't get too excited. It's par for the course to see announcements of wonderful new technologies that will revolutionise displays/battery life/CPU power/whatever. It's always a case of "they won't be available for a couple of years yet", and they usually quietly fade into obscurity. I can remember at least three occasions when people have announced fuel cell technology that's "just about to go into production" in the last 6 years. You still can't buy it as a consumer product, though. Same with flexible screens and various other advances in display technology.

1510.6.2006 10:42
nysdave1
Inactive

Nano Technology is a means of miniturizing components to a fraction of their current size. Needless to say it goes way beyond this simple description. The point is this, when manufacturers can miniturize components, they can minimize costs, thus passing these savings on to us the consumer. The fact that they placed it on a screen 7/10th of an inch simply indicates just how small these internal components really are, nothing more. Is it a major leap? Considering that Nano Technology is still in its development stages I'd dare say yes. It's an amazing technology that's been scientist have been experimenting with in the meical community. It's good to see that it's finally making it's way into other areas of technology and soon into our living rooms.

1613.6.2006 14:03

Quote:
...this type of technology could very quickly make its benefit known to the consumers.
Quote:
...they can minimize costs, thus passing these savings on to us the consumer.
Wake up & smell the toast, people! HDTV is NOT, and never WAS, about consumers. How many times do you remember hearing people say "I like watching TV, but the resolution is just too low." I never did. HDTV is STRICTLY about DRM. Period. There's no other purpose behind it. Higher resolution is simply a by-product, and you'll note that this "saving" both in bandwidth & cost/quality is NOT being "passed on to the consumers" - we're being charged extra for it, AND being forced to buy new equipment to replace equipment that works just fine.

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