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YouTube gets BBC deal

Written by James Delahunty (Google+) @ 03 Mar 2007 18:43 User comments (2)

YouTube gets BBC deal YouTube and the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) had reportedly been in talks about a content deal. Now, both have revealed an agreement that will bring BBC content to Google Inc.'s popular video sharing site. The non-exclusive deal will create three BBC channels, one for news and two for entertainment, on YouTube packed with short clips.
The BBC will use the YouTube deal as a promotional tool for its content, hoping to get some of YouTube's 70 million monthly users to its own sites. Advertising revenue that traffic on the channels generates will shared between YouTube and BBC (although the News channel will have no advertising at all).

Here are some details on the deals...

  • BBC: One of the BBC's two entertainment channels will be a "public service" proposition, featuring no advertising.

    It will show clips like trailers and short features that add value - for example, video diaries of David Tennant showing viewers around the set of Dr Who or BBC correspondent Clive Myrie explaining how difficult it is to report from the streets of Baghdad.

    The channel's main purpose is to popularise current programming and drive traffic back to the BBC's own website, and point the audience to the BBC's pages, where they can watch or download programmes in full, once the BBC Trust approves the corporation's catch-up television proposal, called iPlayer.

  • BBC Worldwide: The second entertainment channel will feature self-contained clips - about three to six minutes long - mining popular programmes in the BBC's archive. Excerpts from Top Gear, The Mighty Boosh and nature programmes presented by David Attenborough are top candidates for this channel.

    This YouTube page will carry advertising such as banner adverts, and possibly pre-roll adverts (shown as part of the video clip) as well. Controversially, the BBC Worldwide page - adverts and all - can be seen in the UK.

    BBC Worldwide insists that this is not a new departure, as BBC magazines like Top Gear and channels like BBC World and UK Living (which shows mainly BBC content) already do carry advertising.

  • BBC News: The news channel, which will be launched later this year, will show about 30 news clips per day. It will be advertising funded like a similar deal with Yahoo USA. BBC News is also offered to non-UK subscribers of Real Networks.

    Because of the advertising, these clips can be seen outside the UK only. Any UK users clicking on a link to one of the news clips on YouTube will get a message that they have no access to this clip.
Source:
BBC News

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2 user comments

13.3.2007 23:31

Going for the advertising route. Better than Banning and charging the site, I can see a lot of companies following.

25.3.2007 23:56

I find it interesting that this deal was announced so shortly after a clip of BBC news footage from September 11th 2001 appeared on youtube. The footage shows BBCs reporter in New York announcing the collapse of wtc7 over twenty minutes before it fell(the building is clearly intact in the report and is visible over the shoulder of the reporter). When asked to explain this anomaly the BBC replied that it couldnt clarify the matter because it had lost its original tapes of its coverage of the day.
Despite the fact that the clip of BBCs news report has been viewed over 225,000 times and should therefore appear on youtube’s ‘most viewed’ page it is entirely absent from the list. Appearance on this list would in all likelihood increase the exposure of this story and highlight serious questions which the BBC has failed to answer convincingly such as:
1. How has the BBC ‘lost’ its original coverage of one of the biggest stories of the last sixty years when it is required by law to keep a number of copies?
2. How did the BBC know wtc7 was going to collapse when before September 11th 2001 no steel-framed skyscraper had ever collapsed due to fire?

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